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Which is the better torque wrench to buy for general torquing for a Tarmac expert (carbon) ?
Seat post, handle bars, brakes etc....

A) the funky springy kind that are cheaper
B) the clicky type that are more expensive

A friend at work said the springy kind although seemingly cheaper feeling are actually more
acurate and you can calibrate yourself by bending it. But the clicky type seem like they would be more acurate but you have to send it in to be cal'd every couple of years.

Thanks for your thoughts.....
 

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prosciutto corsa
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The 'funky springy' type is called a beam toque wrench.

They are cheaper, but perform just as well as the expensive click type. However, you might have trouble using it in tight spaces if you can't read the gauge.

If you get a click type, don't skimp. Money makes a difference here vs. beam type.
 

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Rub it............
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Actually you will need both. Some parts on a bike use a range of torque specs, like a non-drive side crank arm, but others have a max, like stems and seat post clamps.
 

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You also need two torque wrenches; a low range and a high range, if you really want to be precise and do it right.

If you don't want to buy torque wrenches, then all you have to do is work in a pro bike shop for fifteen years and then you'll be able to do it by "feel".
 

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the "clicky type" is called a "break away" torque wrench and with those you set it to the desired torque and once you apply a torque higher than the set torque the wrench disengages. if your not experienced this might be the way to go since you " set it and forget it" and you don't have to worry about over torque something on you bike.
 

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Your friend is definitely wrong in his assumption, but still for bike work the "funky springy" type is well suited. Get a good one though.
note: you really would only sent them out for calibration if you made your living with the thing. For home use, a dial torque wrench would last a long long time if not abused.
tanner3155 said:
Which is the better torque wrench to buy for general torquing for a Tarmac expert (carbon) ?
Seat post, handle bars, brakes etc....

A) the funky springy kind that are cheaper
B) the clicky type that are more expensive

A friend at work said the springy kind although seemingly cheaper feeling are actually more
acurate and you can calibrate yourself by bending it. But the clicky type seem like they would be more acurate but you have to send it in to be cal'd every couple of years.

Thanks for your thoughts.....
 

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Keep in mind that the micrometer type torque wrenches (clicky type) should be dialed down to their lowest setting after use.
 

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pmt said:
You also need two torque wrenches; a low range and a high range, if you really want to be precise and do it right.

If you don't want to buy torque wrenches, then all you have to do is work in a pro bike shop for fifteen years and then you'll be able to do it by "feel".

another reason to learn how to do your own wrenching.
 

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efraguiluz said:
the "clicky type" is called a "break away" torque wrench and with those you set it to the desired torque and once you apply a torque higher than the set torque the wrench disengages. if your not experienced this might be the way to go since you " set it and forget it" and you don't have to worry about over torque something on you bike.
no, micrometer click style wrenches do not have a clutch in them. the wrench will click and torque will peak, go below the set torque and then go past the set torque. if you keep turning it will over torque
 
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