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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently hurt my wrist and I'm looking for a way to stay in shape. What do you think is a better workout? Putting my bike on a trainer or using a stationary bike? It seems like stationary bikes offer a variety of programs and resistance. Thoughts?
 

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Trainer...

bikeman said:
Recently hurt my wrist and I'm looking for a way to stay in shape. What do you think is a better workout? Putting my bike on a trainer or using a stationary bike? It seems like stationary bikes offer a variety of programs and resistance. Thoughts?
I'd take the trainer, because it's your bike. Why change your position and stuff like that on a stationary bike. That being said, if you can ride a trainer or a stationary bike is your wrist hurt enough so that you can't ride your real bike outdoors? Just curious.

Barring any of the above, go for a long run. That works to keep you in shape as well.
 

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A trainer, for the fit.

When riding a trainer it helps a lot to have a program to follow. Warm up X minutes, progressive spin-up, intervals, etc. There are several around. (Check ArnieBakerCycling.com for my favorite.)

Following a program makes the time go much faster. Better still, there are some intense workouts that are probably best performed on a trainer, rather than the road.

Good luck.
 

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One spin class can produce knee pain. The high and low rpms may contribute to this (no cadence meter or speed to gauge with). Also it does not look like a real bike so it's hard to get the seat into the same position as your bike. The resistance is different too.

If you do spinning take your time adjusting the seat and know the measurements to set it up like your bike. Take it easy on it.
 

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Art853 said:
One spin class can produce knee pain. The high and low rpms may contribute to this (no cadence meter or speed to gauge with). Also it does not look like a real bike so it's hard to get the seat into the same position as your bike. The resistance is different too.

If you do spinning take your time adjusting the seat and know the measurements to set it up like your bike. Take it easy on it.

you dont need a cadence meter to know if you are spinning at 60rpm or 120rpm (ie: slow or fast).

while, micro adjustments may be hard, i have no problem getting a spin bike pretty close to my road setup.

the resistance is variable, just as if you were changing gears on a road bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
magnolialover said:
I'd take the trainer, because it's your bike. Why change your position and stuff like that on a stationary bike. That being said, if you can ride a trainer or a stationary bike is your wrist hurt enough so that you can't ride your real bike outdoors? Just curious.

Barring any of the above, go for a long run. That works to keep you in shape as well.
I crashed on my mtn. bike and my wrist is in a cast. Running is out because I started riding because it is easier on my knees. The temps are in the low 70's I wish I could get out and ride!
 

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Cowboy up
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The cadence meter would be useful for distinguishing between your top spin speed on your road bike, say 110 rpm, and something higher, 130 for example, that may be achievable on the spinning bike (i.e. between fast and too fast). This high rpm might contribute to knee pain. The resistance is different so it is not as easy to distinguish. Same issue on the low rpm side.

To clarify what I mean by the resistance being different on a spinning bike compared to a road bike I mean that on a spinning bike the resistance does not increase with speed while on a road bike it does. Also a spinning bike feels more like a flywheel than a freewheel.
 

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I got a spin bike to ride during the rainy wet, 80 - 100 inches or more per year, coastal maritime, and often windy, nasty.

I suppose it's a "spin bike" . . . Schwinn Evolution SR, 35 lb flywheel, fixed gears, multi-position bars, rat trap pedals, road saddle.

Anyway, I do about 20 or 30 minutes with a cardio monitor after a warm up. I do intervals, bringing cardio up to about 85% or more and holding for a couple minutes, then recover until the cardio goes back down.

Watching the heart rate seems to beat the "boredom" factor for me, that and heavy rock music . . . cranked up. Personal favorite tune for the stationary bike is AC/DC --


AC/DC Highway To Hell (1979)

Highway To Hell

Living easy, living free
Season ticket on a one-way ride
Asking nothing, leave me be
Taking everything in my stride
Don't need reason, don't need rhyme
Ain't nothing I would rather do
Going down, party time
My friends are gonna be there too

I'm on the highway to hell

No stop signs, speed limit
Nobody's gonna slow me down
Like a wheel, gonna spin it
Nobody's gonna mess me round
Hey Satan, payin' my dues
Playing in a rocking band
Hey Momma, look at me
I'm on my way to the promised land

I'm on the highway to hell
(Don't stop me)

And I'm going down, all the way down
I'm on the highway to hell
 

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Most people are telling me to go with a spin class

I broke my wrist last week on a bad descent and am trying to decide the same thing, whether to buy a trainer (that I may or may not use after I recover) or go with a spin class or recumbent exercise bike.
My other concern with the trainer is whether it's a good idea to be in my regular riding position, since putting weight on the wrist in a cast isn't neccessarily the wisest idea. I can probably do it, but don't know if I ought to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Alphamoose said:
I broke my wrist last week on a bad descent and am trying to decide the same thing, whether to buy a trainer (that I may or may not use after I recover) or go with a spin class or recumbent exercise bike.
My other concern with the trainer is whether it's a good idea to be in my regular riding position, since putting weight on the wrist in a cast isn't neccessarily the wisest idea. I can probably do it, but don't know if I ought to.
I went to the Dr. for my check up. I told him I was going stir crazy, and he had my cast made to fit my handle bar. He had me hold a broomstick to mold the shape. He said I could ride, so I'm going to give it a try this weekend.
 

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I find that when i do spin classes i to get knee pain i believe that this is because i am unable to get the movement that my shoe / cleat combination gives me. Skin classes are great but i find a hard hit out on my own bike better.
 
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