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We live on a road that the paved shoulder is the white line and drivers will go around you even if a car is coming in the other direction. So, we carry our bikes at least 20 miles to ride. We are also campers and get most of our riding in during outings. Could anyone suggest trainers so we can keep up to speed at home.



Thanks Karen & George:mad2:
 

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Cycleops Fluid is a great one. The Kurt Kinetic gets its share of raves as well. I have the fluid, and I like it, but I still jump on the treadmill to keep the heart, legs, and lungs in good working order when I can't get out on the bike.

Of those two choices, I bought he CycleOps simply because there are more dealers near me...better distributorship, better support in case something goes wrong.

Cheers.
 

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Out of work goaltender
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I would look into rollers. They'll take practice to get used to, but they're a lot more engaging and more fun than painfully boring trainers. I look forward to popping in a tour de france dvd and hittin the rollers but when I forget my rollers at school and have to use my dad's trainer I just want to get off after 5 minutes.
 

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Indoor training is incredibly boring. I suggest that you buy an inexpensive trainer and try it for a while before you spend serious money on a good one.

BTW, I have been riding shoulderless mountain roads for 15 years and haven't been hit yet. If you can ride a straight line it's not as bad as it appears. I do try to avoid the major mountain commute routes during commute hours. Lots of people in my area (including me) work on Silicon Valley and drive like maniacs. Weekends or less traveled roads are fine.
 

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Scary Teddy Bear
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Agreed

ericm979 said:
Indoor training is incredibly boring. I suggest that you buy an inexpensive trainer and try it for a while before you spend serious money on a good one.

BTW, I have been riding shoulderless mountain roads for 15 years and haven't been hit yet. If you can ride a straight line it's not as bad as it appears. I do try to avoid the major mountain commute routes during commute hours. Lots of people in my area (including me) work on Silicon Valley and drive like maniacs. Weekends or less traveled roads are fine.

I ride shoulderless roads fairly frequently, and most motorists are understanding. I have found that I ride about 3-4 feet into the lane from the white line, this forces motorists to actually go AROUND me. I think it is safer that way. If you are adamant about a trainer, I have a Kurt Kinetic that I use in the wintertime that I LOVE.
 

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Rollers and road skills

TylerDurden said:
I would look into rollers. They'll take practice to get used to, but they're a lot more engaging and more fun than painfully boring trainers.
Rollers will build your road riding skills immensely, such that you'll be able to ride on the white line for long distances. This will then allow you to ride on your local roads with more competence and confidence, and then you can save the rollers for the winter and rainy days.
 

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We live on a road that the paved shoulder is the white line and drivers will go around you even if a car is coming in the other direction
+2 on the rollers.

I ride the same kind of roads and some cars do pass me with oncoming traffic. But as physasst has said, I've found that most cars will not pass me with oncoming traffic if I consistently and smoothly ride two feet or so to the left of the white line. Drivers need to commit to cross the center line when passing me.

Of course, old wim ain't no fool. No driver will steer into a head-on crash to save a cyclist—they're going to take me out instead. If I hear brakes screeching behind me, I'm heading for the ditch.
 

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Get some rollers. As mentioned earlier, they're much more entertaining than trainers, and they'll most definitely benefit your road riding skills as well.
 

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Collin's Dad
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Everyone says get rollers and I agree. I bought a trainer about 3 yrs ago, used it 2x, got rollers and have used probably 20 times. Rollers are way nicer to ride, with a trainer I just want to shot myself after 5minutes.
 

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Cat 6
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I would never recommend rollers over a good computrainer like the iMagic/Fortius. Great in conjunction with rollers but I'll take the comp trainer every day. Much better workouts, more varied, competitive to keep motivation, simulated terrains from rolling to STEEP climbs and tons of data to track improvement (assuming you don't already have a computer that gives you tons of data to analyze).
 

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rollers vs trainers

many threads on this.... but, a ex-pro buddie of mine told me:

if you want to just condition, get a trainer.... you get more resistance and you can watch a training dvd/movie and just ride.

for smooth spin/handling, etc. then rollers are nice, but it does take some learning and concentrating or else you'll fly off and destroy furniture/electronics, etc.

i use a kurt kinetic, watch tour and cts training dvds.

john
 

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is this for a road/racing bike, I assume?

Get the latest 2006 model of Tacx Sirius. Not too expensive, very quiet and plenty of resistance (10 levels times all your own bicycle gears).
I use it for bad weather strength training at home. Tacx is used by a bunch of pro tour teams. Good unit. Good brand.

Trainers are very boring if you jump on and spin. What you should be doing on the trainer is a *program* of hard exercises then the time flies because you *suffer* like you are meant to. If you are not suffering on the trainer you are wasting your time.

For example here is what I got from a cycling coach and I promise this will make you suffer - intervals/sprints. Don't cheat. Suffer!

12 * 5 sec sprints, 30 seconds recovery between each sprint
3 min easy spinning at end
6 * 10 sec, 60 seconds recovery between each
3 min easy spinning at end
4 * 15 sec sprints with 90 sec recovery between each
5 min of easy spinning at end

repeat above set total of 3 times, should take 75-90 min of suffering, I promise.

Try two or three times per week and then tell me if riding a trainer is boring.

Note: by Sprint above I mean going ~110-120rpm, flat out hard. Think last 200 metres of Le Tour's bunch sprint end of a stage and you get the idea. You need a computer with cadence and with a seconds time display for this to work well.
 
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