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your god hates me
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(also posted in the Coaching forum)

My wife asks "I'm looking for a training book geared towards recreational cycling. I'd like to become faster for club rides but I'm not looking to peak for a race. I'm looking to be able to be consistent through a long Spring, Summer, Fall cycling season."

She was training with a cycling coach for the past 4 or 5 months, but he seemed more oriented towards racers, and she found that his training regimen not only didn't encourage her to do the types of rides she enjoys most, it seemed to conspire against her being able to do them! She'd be so beat from her mid-week training that when it came time to do a fast, or hilly (or fast and hilly) club ride on Saturday she'd be wiped out.

She already has Joe Friel's book. Any other recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 

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there are a bunch like this (Carmichael has one, etc) but they don't have much beyond the obvious. Save yourself some money - almost all training regimes come down to 2 days/week of speedwork/intervals, 2-4 days of long rides, and the rest is gravy (adding in more long days where possible and including long efforts of 20 minutes in them, such as climbs). Since she's doing it for fun the speed days don't have to be super-structured, just do things like ride a short hill at a hard pace (2-5 minutes), try to chase down riders etc.
 

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just ride as hard as your body tells you it can go - not time trial type effort, just hard, basically poor mans sweet spot. Why make things complicated and structured when your goal is to maintain and improve fitness and have fun doing it, the structured junk is a great way to burn yourself out and forget why you like riding the bike.
 

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Captain Obvious
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how much does she ride? she probably just needs a couple days a week of more focused training.

does she use a heart rate monitor or power meter? either one helps a lot.
 

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Old, but good.

Written long before heart rate monitors and power meters were foisted off on the cycling public, this still is one of the best books to inspire the recreational cyclist. Forget the awful cover—the writing is excellent and there are good training schedules for starting out, touring or perhaps riding a century one day. The chapters on how to buy and maintain a bike are completely outdated, but so what.
http://www.amazon.com/Richards-Cycling-Fitness-John-Schubert/dp/0345341171
 

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your god hates me
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
tomk96 said:
how much does she ride? she probably just needs a couple days a week of more focused training.

does she use a heart rate monitor or power meter? either one helps a lot.

She rides probably somewhere between 120-170 miles per week on average, 52 weeks a year. (Higher mileage in the summer, lower in the winter, obviously.) Club rides on Saturday & Sunday, solo training 2 or 3 midweek days.

She does use a heart rate monitor. No PowerTap...yet.
 

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I was surfing another site (http://www.bikesportmichigan.com/shop/product.php?productid=16392&cat=250&page=1), remembered your post and thought I would pass this along. I know nothing about the book, but thought it may help. Good Luck.

The Female Cyclist: Gearing Up a Level

by Gale Bernhardt

Information on a woman’s training needs is often hard to come by; most of the advice regarding training and performance has been based on the needs of male cyclists. This book contains unique information on bike fit for women, a periodized strength-training program, and specific, detailed training plans. With Bernhardt’s book it’s easy to avoid common pitfalls, such as overtraining and basing fitness on appearance rather than health and well-being. Includes an introduction by Linda Jackson, an accomplished athlete known for disregarding age and gender barriers.
Paperback. B&w photos and tables throughout.
 

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Anti-Hero
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SlaminSam said:
Information on a woman’s training needs is often hard to come by; most of the advice regarding training and performance has been based on the needs of male cyclists...
That's because training for men and women is generally the same. A specific program for women is not needed. To put it blatantly, most women just need to HTFU a little bit :D
 

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has she thought about entering a time trial series to give her training some focus without having to enter mass start events? Most areas have some sort of monthly time trial series - you can compete against your own times from month to month (as well as others...). Typically low key but enough to help provide some structure for training.
 

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stevesbike said:
has she thought about entering a time trial series to give her training some focus without having to enter mass start events?
Good point—my wife started her racing career with time trials and has fond memories of those times. BTW, the John Schubert book I recommended contains some good advice on time trialing and how to train for it.
 

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Captain Obvious
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Bob Ross said:
She rides probably somewhere between 120-170 miles per week on average, 52 weeks a year. (Higher mileage in the summer, lower in the winter, obviously.) Club rides on Saturday & Sunday, solo training 2 or 3 midweek days.

She does use a heart rate monitor. No PowerTap...yet.
personally, it sound like she rides plenty. she may want to try some intervals for her midweek time on the bike.

i like chris carmichael's book which i think is an easier read over the friel book.
 

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A wheelist
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Bob Ross said:
She rides probably somewhere between 120-170 miles per week on average, 52 weeks a year. (Higher mileage in the summer, lower in the winter, obviously.) Club rides on Saturday & Sunday, solo training 2 or 3 midweek days.
I wish I rode that much. I used to (& more) but I couldn't recover from it now. So my rides have to be shorter and harder. Fact - she won't get faster unless she rides faster than her normal "hard" pace. The way to do that, of course, is by using Intervals. How do you ride 24mph if your hard ride is 20mph? Answer - ride at 24mph in short bursts ~ Intervals. If she doesn't like the structured stuff, get her to research Fartlek.

Subscribe to the www.roadbikerider.com Thursday e-mail newsletter. There she will find many downloadable e-books and e-articles (for a price) on many topics that may help. They're all aimed at recreational cyclists.

But - to go faster she must develop Power. Fred Matheny's "Power to the Pedals" $4 e-article is a good basic one. It's for trainer or road and could be adapted to Fartlek from structured.
 
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