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Climbs like a sprinter...
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I'm and old (52), fat (190lbs 5' 9") Cat 4. I was really lazy this winter and got up to 202 so now I'm fighting an uphill battle to get down to around 160. I've lost 12 lbs since the beginning of March. Because we're down to one income now I can't do a lot of traveling/racing but that's OK. I really want to lose 25-30 more pounds. I've started doing daily doubles - an hour ride before work and 60-90 minutes after work three days a week plus a Saturday ride. I can read my body so I know that right now I'm probably too fatigued to hang with the A group tonight so I drove to work and won't ride tonight. The question is what will the long term effects be as far as conditioning for racing next year of riding so much but with a focus on weight loss instead of racing? Clear as mud?
 

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Eat a bit less, ride a bit more, whenever you can. Bike commuting is the best since one can kill so many birds with one stone (save gas, leaves a car at home for others, saves time since you overlap commute time with ride time, etc.). Usually 1.5 hours minimum per work day for me, if I use the train one way.

Don't kill yourself riding, try riding zone 2 mostly initially, then once you start getting stronger add Tempo, threshold, etc. etc. You can burn a lot of calories riding high zone 2 since one can ride pretty good KJs (from ample ride time), compared to short hard rides.
 

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So, I'm and old (52), fat (190lbs 5' 9") Cat 4. I was really lazy this winter and got up to 202 so now I'm fighting an uphill battle to get down to around 160. I've lost 12 lbs since the beginning of March. Because we're down to one income now I can't do a lot of traveling/racing but that's OK. I really want to lose 25-30 more pounds. I've started doing daily doubles - an hour ride before work and 60-90 minutes after work three days a week plus a Saturday ride. I can read my body so I know that right now I'm probably too fatigued to hang with the A group tonight so I drove to work and won't ride tonight. The question is what will the long term effects be as far as conditioning for racing next year of riding so much but with a focus on weight loss instead of racing? Clear as mud?
Cals in v cals out, amigo. All this will do is build up a base. This is what--10 hours of riding per week or so--enough to justify a standard periodized plan. I can't see how it would hurt, unless you're doing DQ tap sucks once the snow starts in the fall and winter. IIRC, you used the carmichael plan. If you're riding 10 hours a week for six weeks, and then do carmichael for eight, then repeat, it's base/build base/build. The top end stuff will leave if you don't use it, but I've read it comes back. (I could never regain what I never had in the first place.)
 

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One thing I would mention is that if you're trying to lose weight you'll also likely be trying to restrict your calories which will in turn increase your recovery time and make training more challenging--unless you eat super clean. It's a hard balance.
 

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Climbs like a sprinter...
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So I have been watching the caloric intake so I suppose that's why I feel the fatigue I am. But that's the point of the post I guess. I'm willing to trade the stamina/power to get down to a healthy weight. But my concern is how long will it take to recover the power/stamina/top end once I get down to where I want?
 

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Being an average racer juggling career and family I've learned to either lose weight in the kitchen or gain fitness on the bike. Too difficult for me to do both. So, the most success I've had losing weight was when I wasn't doing much cardio and focused on the kitchen (counting calories). Every time I ramp up the stress on the bike I over eat as I'm hungry all the time. I'm sure many can do both but, I've simply come to accept I can not. Even slight calorie deficits left me feeling fatigued. ymmv
 

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I don't know much about it but what works for me is ride, ride and then ride more.
I am about 90% bike, I go everywhere on the bike, I am still eating a lot of everything but I changed a few habits; I don't drink as much soda, only once in a while, I eat less but more time per day and I try to have small dinner before bed. I still like I have the power, I am not a great rider but I have been improving a lot and I lost weight.
When I started cycling I was 185 at 5' 10", after doing recreational riding for almost 2 years, I dropped the weight to 170 but by the end of last season I decided to race in 2013 and I got it down to 160 now, it does not sounds like a lot of weight loss but I feel great.
 

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Climbs like a sprinter...
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't know much about it but what works for me is ride, ride and then ride more.
I am about 90% bike, I go everywhere on the bike, I am still eating a lot of everything but I changed a few habits; I don't drink as much soda, only once in a while, I eat less but more time per day and I try to have small dinner before bed. I still like I have the power, I am not a great rider but I have been improving a lot and I lost weight.
When I started cycling I was 185 at 5' 10", after doing recreational riding for almost 2 years, I dropped the weight to 170 but by the end of last season I decided to race in 2013 and I got it down to 160 now, it does not sounds like a lot of weight loss but I feel great.
 

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I would say worry about adjusting your lifestyle to gradually and slowly lose the weight, and find a maintenance level that you can stay at. Obviously where you are at right now isn't sustainable, and where you were at wasn't good or you wouldn't have gained the weight.
I would focus on eating healthier and less on calorie restriction, you'll still see benefits. I would focus more on reducing stress in your life, either by learning to manage it, or reducing things that cause it. I would also try to get into a better pattern of sleeping, because rest is probably as important as anything in our lives.
I hope you are doing some of your riding for fun and not always preparation for racing, because that gets old pretty quick. I train on the road, but race mountain bikes and ride them for fun. Always worrying about the training and the preparation for road racing is what burned me out in the early 90's, it wasn't fun anymore. Biking should be fun imho.
 

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Yes, but he asked the question nearly 3 months ago. It seems that horse is out of the barn, down the road, and over the hill by now.
Maybe so, hopefully he'll chime in for a quick update.
Some of us are in a similar situation and encouragement is never a bad thing.
 
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