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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've noticed training distinguished from racing.

How is a "training" bike set up as opposed to a "racing" bike?

Are there other bike set ups?

And, what type of riding does training entail? And the others...

Thanks.
 

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Training is all the riding that a racer does when they are not actually racing. Intervals, climbing repeats, long endurance rides, fast group rides, easy trips to the store (recovery ride).

My "training" bike has lights and fenders on it right now (http://ericm.lne.com/blog/?p=200). The fenders will come off when it stops raining and the lights come off when its light early in the morning. Other than that it's perfectly raceable and the position is the same as on my race bike. I train a lot on my race bike too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Wonder where I fit?

I will be riding daily for fun and recreation, for personal conditioning and for working out.

I'll try to get in as many Century runs as I can and on the weekends, I'll try to ride over 50 miles.

While I'm not interested in going all out with $600. shoes and $2500. wheelsets, I will eventually have "real" roading gear. Bike wise, for the kind of riding I want to do, I think that a $5000. bike will be enough (again, eventually).

I'm guessing I'd be an Enthusiast?
 

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If a cyclist has a separate bike set up for training and racing, in general the racing bike will be lighter and more expensive, and usually less durable as a result of its lower weight.

Both bikes should be set up so that they feel exactly the same to the rider, to minimize issues when transitioning between bikes (ever gone from a mtb straight to a road bike?)

Most people, however, don't have the money for this. What they will do is buy a REALLY nice set of wheels for racing on, like Zipps. They won't ride on these all the time 'cause they're fragile and ludicrously expensive. A set of race wheels can quickly turn your training bike into a lively, spirited racing bike.

If you're just out to have fun, buy a reasonably nice bike that you will enjoy riding, and don't worry about what the racers do. $5000 will buy you a very nice bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. I'm learning. :)

While weight is important, I personally prefer strength and reliability and prioritize them.
For example, my bike's stock weight is 20.67lbs.
If I can knock it down a few lbs to say the 17lb range,
I'd be more than happy with that.

But if I didn't get it below 20lbs, I'd be perfectly content with that as well.

20 and strong is better for me than 15 and weaker.

Especially with our local roads and with the way I beat bikes.
 

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There are plenty of durable fun-to-ride aluminum and carbon bikes in the 17 to 18 lb range to choose from. Any bike in this weight range is quite raceable, should you choose to, and you certainly won't need to spend 5 Gs to get a bike in this weight range ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
crispy010 said:
There are plenty of durable fun-to-ride aluminum and carbon bikes in the 17 to 18 lb range to choose from. Any bike in this weight range is quite raceable, should you choose to, and you certainly won't need to spend 5 Gs to get a bike in this weight range ;)
Hi C,

I've already have a 21lber I just bought (08 Trek 1.5) which I can get into the sub-17lb range fairly inexpensively (total bike cost post upgrades...about 1000.).

I'd upgrade the $5K bike later on when after I've been riding for a while.
The natural progression for me would be to a Madone 5 Series because of the nearly identical geometry of the Treks, but I'm leaving myself open to whatever bike fits me when I get up to that level in my riding.

Basically, I can get my 1.5 right at Madone weight range (which I believe is around 16.64lbs while the 1.5 is 20.67lbs) if I really want to for about $1500., but it'll be close to the Madone in weight only. I've ridden a Madone and find it to be more comfortable (ride wise) and felt like I could ride that thing forever.

Even when I get the uber bike, I'm still keeping the 1.5. I currently have 5 bikes altogether. 2 MTB's, 1 hardtail I'm thinking about turning into an XC biike, a vintage roadie and the 1.5.

:)

Question:

When people here talk about racing, what type do they mean? Local amateur events? Or just personal riding? Or both?
 

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Racing normally means USCF amateur events. I don't think I've ever heard just riding along and doing the occasional groupride referred to as racing. But, some of the fast grouprides do tend to feel a lot like races sometimes - they can be pretty brutal in a fun way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
crispy010 said:
Racing normally means USCF amateur events. I don't think I've ever heard just riding along and doing the occasional groupride referred to as racing. But, some of the fast grouprides do tend to feel a lot like races sometimes - they can be pretty brutal in a fun way.
Thank you for the enlightment. :thumbsup:
 
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