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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone enlighten me as to how this bike would be for recreational riding, say 30-50 milers with an occasional century. I've found what looks like a good deal on craigslist on a very lightly used 2006 model and will be taking it for a test ride this weekend. The current owner has aerobars on it and did some time trials with it. I'm not interested in racing as much as a dependable comfortable ride. I believe the wheels are stock, and I'm not sure about the spoke pattern. I weigh about 185 and usually ride on fairly smooth roads or bike paths. I guess my concern is that this model is geared more towards racing and may not be the best for a rider looking to get back in shape. Seems like a pretty good deal at $1250 if it fits me. Pretty much what I expected to spend for an aluminum bike with 105, while the Trek 5000 is carbon with 105/Ultegra mix.

I'll stop rambling now. I'd welcome any comments
 

· Darling of The Lounge
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Are you new to road cycling?

Given the mileage and type of riding you plan on doing, maybe a hybrid bike like a Specialized Sirrus is a better choice. I would hate to see you spend a lot of money on a bike that may not fit your riding requirements.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm not new to riding, but I'm not all that educated on bike geometry. For example, how do the differences in geometries(not materials) of the Trek 1.2, 1.5, 2.1, Madone affect their handling.

I started out with a Specialized hybrid about 15 years ago. After about a year I found the older Centurion and never rode the hybrid again. I had planned on picking up something like a Trek 1200/1.2, Specialized Allez within the next six months but 5000 just appeared.
 

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Retro Grouch said:
Are you new to road cycling?

Given the mileage and type of riding you plan on doing, maybe a hybrid bike like a Specialized Sirrus is a better choice. I would hate to see you spend a lot of money on a bike that may not fit your riding requirements.
What? A hybrid? I can't imagine doing 50 mile rides, with an occasional century on a regular basis with a hybrid bike!

To the OP, When you say areo bars, I assume you mean the clip on kind, and there are still road drop bars with STI shifters on there. I would ride the bike and see how it feels, make sure it FITS you, and if you like it- GET it! :thumbsup:
 

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dadwhobikes said:
Can anyone enlighten me as to how this bike would be for recreational riding, say 30-50 milers with an occasional century. I've found what looks like a good deal on craigslist on a very lightly used 2006 model and will be taking it for a test ride this weekend. The current owner has aerobars on it and did some time trials with it. I'm not interested in racing as much as a dependable comfortable ride. I believe the wheels are stock, and I'm not sure about the spoke pattern. I weigh about 185 and usually ride on fairly smooth roads or bike paths. I guess my concern is that this model is geared more towards racing and may not be the best for a rider looking to get back in shape. Seems like a pretty good deal at $1250 if it fits me. Pretty much what I expected to spend for an aluminum bike with 105, while the Trek 5000 is carbon with 105/Ultegra mix.

I'll stop rambling now. I'd welcome any comments
I've been riding a 5000 for a little over a year I do ride fairly long distances,60 to 100 miles a ride. I t took me a while to get seated properly on the bike that might have been because I was coming from MTBing .Bontrager wheels are the standard with a 20 spoke pattern. I ripped all the spokes from the drive side of the rear wheel, I am currently waiting for Trek to send me a replacement under warranty. They can take their sweet time as my LBS provided me with a loaner...a ZIPP 404!:D I don't want to give it back:idea:

Is it a double or a triple? I ride a double with the 53/39..a triple might be have better use for more casual riding. The standard components are more than adequate I did swap the bulky saddle for something more streamline and added a set of Look sprint pedals and some light weight tires.
Price might be a little high even if it is only slightly used.However it is a good value for the buck.
 

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I have had a 5200 and now ride a 5900 under similar conditions to what you are describing. As a 45 year old, I do not have any problems with comfort. If comfort is a main concern, you could look the Trek Pilot or Specialized Roubaix series of bikes. They perform nicely and I am to understand that the geometry makes them a little less twitchy. (not that I have found that to be an issue)
 

· Cycling induced anoesis
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dadwhobikes said:
I'm not new to riding, but I'm not all that educated on bike geometry. For example, how do the differences in geometries(not materials) of the Trek 1.2, 1.5, 2.1, Madone affect their handling.
All the models you mentoned share the same geometry, except the Modone Pro fit, which I doubt you're focusing on anyway. That series has a shorter head tube length.

IME, Trek geometry is balanced. Overall handling is predictable, steering is quick without being twitchy - all in all, confidence inspiring.

To expand your options and as another poster mentioned, the Spec Roubaix would be worth a look. Judging from your original post I think it would easily meet your needs.
 

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With the exception of the wheels (durability has not been the strong suit of the Bontrager Select wheels), the 2006 Trek 5000 is a solid bike with good components. The TCT Carbon frame is heavier than OCLV (and made in Taiwan if that makes any difference to you) but will still provide a nice ride. That said, make sure it fits you good on a test ride...a poor fitting full carbon bike is not a better deal than a good fitting aluminum bike. Fit, more than material, is the most important thing.
 

· Fat'r + Slow'r than TMB
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The only thing I have to add is the 1200 does sound a little high for what you describe. 1000 would be a little bit more in line with what I have seen locally for similar. Some of the new 07 clearance ones I have seen for about 1500.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Definitely no plans to buy the bike if it doesn't fit. I may not even bring any money with me just to be safe.

I think part of his reason for asking $1250 is that it does include pedals (Speedplay X5), the clip-on aero bars, and the wireless computer w/cadence. Pedals are one thing I've been meaning to buy, anyway, and I would end up putting a computer on it as well. It's got a double on it, although he said the shifter was for a triple. In Kansas the only time I've wanted a triple is when the wind is blowing. I plan on using my existing bike for rainy days with a set of rollers I picked up from a guy at work.

The Specialized Roubaix does look like a sweet bike, too. However, one of those in my price range hasn't come along yet. Twitchiness is what I was a bit worried about. The head and seat tube angles are about to what I am riding now. I'll know more after I ride it.

Thanks for all the opinions. They've been helpful.
 

· Darling of The Lounge
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Kestreljr said:
What? A hybrid? I can't imagine doing 50 mile rides, with an occasional century on a regular basis with a hybrid bike!
I've done many Solvang century rides where I see quite a few hybrids. In fact, I see people on 25 pound plus full suspension downhill bikes with knobby tires mixing it up with the roadies. The riders that amaze me are the ones on TT bikes with a full disk rear wheels. I can barely keep an aero tuck for five miles, let alone 100 :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Certainly nothing wrong with a hybrid. I've been down that road before, though. It just wasn't for me. I also know I don't want something only good for racing or TTs. My main concern is the position of the handle bar relative to the seat. On my bike, they are roughly even. I usually ride with my hands on the hoods, so right off the bat, this would be a lower position for me. That said, I do believe my existing stem is a bit too long, so a shorter stem with a lower bar may cancel each other out a bit. Nothing happens if it doesn't fit and feel right. The seller offered to let me take it for a couple of hours. We work at the same company so he knows where I can be found.

Actually, the hardest part is parting with the money. I've got the savings, but I am a cheapskate. Is 42 too young to blame this on a mid-life crisis? I'm pretty sure my neighbor started his around my age (Corvette and boat).
 

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Good bike...

dadwhobikes said:
Definitely no plans to buy the bike if it doesn't fit. I may not even bring any money with me just to be safe.

I think part of his reason for asking $1250 is that it does include pedals (Speedplay X5), the clip-on aero bars, and the wireless computer w/cadence. Pedals are one thing I've been meaning to buy, anyway, and I would end up putting a computer on it as well. It's got a double on it, although he said the shifter was for a triple. In Kansas the only time I've wanted a triple is when the wind is blowing. I plan on using my existing bike for rainy days with a set of rollers I picked up from a guy at work.

The Specialized Roubaix does look like a sweet bike, too. However, one of those in my price range hasn't come along yet. Twitchiness is what I was a bit worried about. The head and seat tube angles are about to what I am riding now. I'll know more after I ride it.

Thanks for all the opinions. They've been helpful.
...I had a 2004 Trek 5000 that I just gave to my little sister, and it was a great all day in the saddle bike...quick enough for sprinting and climbs, plenty of compliance for rugged roads, fairly light, a decent set of wheels and components...I would try to get it for $1000, or tell the guy to forget the aero bars (unless you really want them)...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
These positive reviews of the bike are not making it any easier to pass this up... Everyone at work says I should get the bike, too. Of course, when did a friend ever tell you not to spend money. At least my hobbies aren't as expensive as theirs. I pulled the cash out of the bank this afternoon...

I am willing to part with the aero bars, and maybe even the speedplays. While I've been wanting to get pedals to replace my toe-clips, I've been leaning towards mountain bike pedals and shoes I can walk in. Will that look strange? So what. The beauty of being over 40 and married with kids is that I don't care anymore if I look like a dork.
 

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dadwhobikes said:
These positive reviews of the bike are not making it any easier to pass this up... Everyone at work says I should get the bike, too. Of course, when did a friend ever tell you not to spend money. At least my hobbies aren't as expensive as theirs. I pulled the cash out of the bank this afternoon...

I am willing to part with the aero bars, and maybe even the speedplays. While I've been wanting to get pedals to replace my toe-clips, I've been leaning towards mountain bike pedals and shoes I can walk in. Will that look strange? So what. The beauty of being over 40 and married with kids is that I don't care anymore if I look like a dork.
There is plenty of room on the side of the highway for another dork:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay, after a rainy Saturday and a busy Sunday, I managed to get over and ride the Trek 5000 this evening. The first thing I notice is that it is a triple and not a double. This is fine. I adjust seat height and put on my pedals and head off for a local park with a nice bike path. Right away I notice a noise coming from the front deraileur. It took me a couple of seconds to figure it out, then I see that the outer cage has been bent and is rubbing on the crank. Even in the middle chainring. I get off and can see that the crank has been scratched. This has been going on for a while, me thinks. I manage to bend the cage back and continue on. The rear deraileur shifts fine, but the front is difficult to shift. It seems to shift to the large chainring, but won't go to the small. After a few miles I can sometimes get it to shift properly, but not consistently. To be honest, I was so distracted by this issue that I didn't pay much attention to anything else.

I return to the sellers house and give everything a good lookover. It does seem to be in good shape other than the front deraileur. I think it probably just needs a tuneup. The seller says he rode it for 250 miles and then just lost his motivation for riding. When I asked about the front deraileur, he first said he hadn't noticed, then said it might have happened during one of his moves, then said that maybe he had heard it before. He stated that he usually only rode on the middle ring. He also said that he was not comfortable working on the bike and even had the bike computer installed by the bike shop.

I went there to be wowwed by the ride, but I don't think I was. The bike is definitely light. It would take a little getting used to, as my current ride has friction shifters on the downtube. It was a fairly smooth ride. It fit pretty well. I might want a slightly shorter stem. I also found the hoods to be wider and not as comfortable as my old Shimano 600 hoods, but a set of gloves with less padding might take care of that. I didn't really have a chance to open it up and see what it would do, though. I was really just frustrated and disappointed that it didn't shift better up front.

So, I had him down to $1250 over the phone. I told him I didn't want the Speedplay X-5 pedals or the aerobars. I'd value these at about $50 each. I left the bike with him and told him I would call about a tune up and let him know. I had the cash with me, and had it shifted properly, I might have jumped on it. He has been trying to sell it for a couple of months, so I don't think it is going anywhere. I told him that if someone else wanted it that my feelings wouldn't be hurt. I'm leaning towards either waiting until spring and getting something else, or offering him X dollars minus the cost of the tune up. I'm not sure how much X should be at this point.

Any thoughts?
 

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Price is still to high, if the front derailleur is bent just price in a replacement 30 or 40 bucks , installed with a good tune 100 bucks. Have you ridden similar bikes to check out the fit for comparison?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
After thinking about this all day, I'm starting to have slightly better thoughts about the bike. I realized that it was only my left hand that was sore, and that was probably because I was so darn focused on the the shifting of the front deraileur. When I got home, I took my current bike for a short spin, and there was a definite difference.

I called the shop where the bike was originally purchased and they thought that the front deraileur would be a pretty simple problem to fix. Just in case, they do have a new one in stock. Their tune ups run $30, $60, or $110. The new FD would run about $63. Make the replacement an even $100. A $30 dollar tune up would probably be sufficient, but I might use $60 for sake of negotiations and come up a bit. He has already listed the pedals on craigslist for $80, and mentioned taking $50 off for the aerobars. For some reason $950 is coming to me as an initial offer. $1050 is probably the highest I would go.

The guy at the bikestore was great. He looked it up in his computer and thought I should jump on it if I could get it for $1000. He has probably earned my business.
 
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