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Discussion Starter #1
Hi There

From Switzerland and looking to change my 5 years old Canyon Endurace AL 6.0, the Trek Emonda seems to me to hit the right spot.

The budget is what it is and the max I could afford is the SL 5. Maybe the SL 6 but the I don’t really see the benefit of the Ultegra groupset over 105.

Another solution is to buy the ALR 5 or 6 and add a good set of wheels, like the Zipp 303s or DT Swiss ARC 1100.

The open point for me is to understand if the carbon frame is really better than the aluminium one? And if yes, how and why?

Cheers folks

Sam
 

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For road/gravel, I ride 3 main bikes. 2 are aluminum and 1 is carbon. I think they are all great bikes, personally don't feel much ride difference between them if at all.

On a good day I can set a PR on my aluminum road bike even though it's alloy and 8 years older than my carbon bike.

But in your case... I believe the Emonda is supposed to be a first-rate climbing bike which should be light... so almost certainly the carbon one fits that bill better. Yeah, the components and wheels offset that... but your next upgrade down the line could be wheels. There are always good deals to be found.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your answer

As you, i dont care about the frame material. The ride characteristics, the ride feeling I should say as the weight, is more important to me.

The aluminium frame is lighter than the carbon OCLV 500 one ... if it’s more aerodynamic (but at my speed and I’m not riding at 40 km/h) or more comfortable, then I’ll take it.

I’m riding mostly on ondulated, wavy roads and sometimes goes for a big alpine ride. And I want just a bike to ride everywhere, anytime.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It will be an Emonda SL 5. Wheel upgrade in a few months, when the temperature will rise a bit.

Should be here for the week-end.
 

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Interesting choice. I’d be interested to know the weight out of the box - you know, before pedals and accessories, but including saddle and bars.
 

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Good choice. Most of the pro riders on the Trek teams (men and women) use the Emonda, which is Trek’s lightest bike. Those riders have a choice of the Madone (go fast aero), Domane (all-rounder, Spring classics) and Emonda (tour, climber).

Enjoy!


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Discussion Starter #7
It’s a size 54 and it weights 8.7 kg.

I will change the tires for tubeless ready and mount it without tubes for sure in the next weeks.

As it is now, and due to a miserable weather here in Switzerland (I rode 30 km yesterday with a medium temperature of zero celsius), it has only seen 130 km in total.
 

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Great choice. I guess... as I had been looking at Emonda Al as a winter / travel bike too.
I decided to dedicate my BMC Road Machine Two for the winter. It’s carbon and I mounted mud ( crud ) guards.
I look at it like this. .. if i’m going to have the discipline to consistently ride the road in cold of winter; I want the best ride I can get . A harsh aluminum road frame does not meet that criteria. I also want a decent group, 105 and a comfortable carbon frame.

Let’s see your new bike 🚲 if you get the right pic .
What Winter Road shoes are you wearing?

Hint: Tubeless flats in the winter are a no fix on the road side.
Better think tube.
 

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I look at it like this. .. if i’m going to have the discipline to consistently ride the road in cold of winter; I want the best ride I can get . A harsh aluminum road frame does not meet that criteria. I also want a decent group, 105 and a comfortable carbon frame.
Not all AL frames are harsh. Some AL frames were like noodles (eg. Alan) and others are smooth enough for long rides (eg. CAAD 12). It really depends on tube diameter and geometry. To fit wide tires, the Checkpoint will have longer chainstays (42.5) and wheelbase (> 102 for 54cm & up) that makes a more flexible frame. Plus tire volume will be a bigger absorber of road/gravel vibration. A carbon road bike with 25-28mm tires won’t feel as plush as an AL bike with 35mm or bigger tires (lower pressure, wide footprint). Granted, the bigger tire bike may feel more sluggish but most winter riding isn’t about fast rides.


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It’s a size 54 and it weights 8.7 kg.
My friend got a used 54 cm SL6 a couple of years ago, it weighed the same. Interestingly, my 2017 Domane SL6 (also 54) weighed the same, too.

I have been staring at the Emonda SLR 7 a lot. If I can decide on a power meter I might just pull the trigger.
 

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You should really be happy with your SL5. I got the blue version back in June with the intent of upgrading wheels, handlebar and components as they become available. So far I've only been able to upgrade the wheels to full carbon and the seatpost to carbon. The aluminum wheels that come stock are fine, but on the heavy side. The 105 groupset works just fine, but is not as refined as Ultegra, mind you I was coming from an older Dura Ace 9000 groupset on an aluminum framed bike. I think it is definitely a bike you can grow with (as in upgrading as your budget allows). I wanted a bike with disc brakes and I'm not disappointed. Hope you don't have to wait long for it, if you haven't already gotten the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You should really be happy with your SL5. I got the blue version back in June with the intent of upgrading wheels, handlebar and components as they become available. So far I've only been able to upgrade the wheels to full carbon and the seatpost to carbon. The aluminum wheels that come stock are fine, but on the heavy side. The 105 groupset works just fine, but is not as refined as Ultegra, mind you I was coming from an older Dura Ace 9000 groupset on an aluminum framed bike. I think it is definitely a bike you can grow with (as in upgrading as your budget allows). I wanted a bike with disc brakes and I'm not disappointed. Hope you don't have to wait long for it, if you haven't already gotten the bike.
I got my bike. As it is a bit cold and wet, frozen I should say, I’m not riding that much or fast. But......

I appreciate a lot how comfortable it is and snappy it feels. The 105 groupset works fine and is maybe not as refined as Ultegra and a bit heavier too. But I never had a better groupset, so it doesn’t matter.

About the wheels. Yes they feels heavy and holding the bike back. For sure I’ll invest in a nice pair of carbon mid height wheels in a few months.

Last point; brake discs are so perfect. But I was already convinced as I’m a mountain biker.
 

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I got my bike. As it is a bit cold and wet, frozen I should say, I’m not riding that much or fast. But......

I appreciate a lot how comfortable it is and snappy it feels. The 105 groupset works fine and is maybe not as refined as Ultegra and a bit heavier too. But I never had a better groupset, so it doesn’t matter.

About the wheels. Yes they feels heavy and holding the bike back. For sure I’ll invest in a nice pair of carbon mid height wheels in a few months.

Last point; brake discs are so perfect. But I was already convinced as I’m a mountain biker.
Cool! My Giant cross bike convinced me to go to disc brakes on any road bike going forward, that bike's setup also got me to go back to Shimano after riding SRAM.
 
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