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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,
Any recommendations for a triathlon bike? Are either of these (Orbea Ordu or Cervelo P2C or P3) better than another or is there something else you would recommend?
Thanks
PS more interested in sprints to std. triathlons. Not ironmans (at this point in my life)
 

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classiquesklassieker
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kendo said:
Hi,
Any recommendations for a triathlon bike? Are either of these (Orbea Ordu or Cervelo P2C or P3) better than another or is there something else you would recommend?
Thanks
PS more interested in sprints to std. triathlons. Not ironmans (at this point in my life)
OK, I'll bite. How new are you to cycling, and how new are you to triathlons? Unless you are trying to improve your average speed from 25mph to 26mph for the cycling leg, let's face it: you don't need such specialized equipment. You should instead consider getting a standard road bike, and then put on a clip-on aerobar if you feel the need to.

Tri bikes are optimized for aerodynamics, and some biomechanics. They tend to have significantly less control than the standard road bike, and the handling tends to leave a lot to be desired (or needed). I don't like to ride anywhere near somebody with a full-on tri bike, unless I know that they have really good handling skills.

When shopping for a road bike, you can put geometry into consideration, whether you can convert it into a more aerodynamic setup in the future or not. For example, you may choose a bike with a low head-tube so that you can lower your stem in the future, should you want to install a clip-on aerobar, yada yada yada.
 

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On your left!
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OK with OJ

for the most part.

but if its a tri bike you want, then you should get a tri bike.

From your post, I gather two important pieces of info.

1. You are new to the sport

2. You will focus on sprints, meaning 12 to 18 mile bike legs.

Building a tri bike (or a time trial bike) is tons of fun because you get to shop for special bars, special wheels...all the way to special shoes. For sprints, I'd recommend going more light weight rather than heavy on the super aero.

No disc wheel, rather a mid or deep front and at most a mid rear.

If you will be training alone and away from heavy traffic areas, go for a full aero bar set up with bar end shifting in the end of your aero bars (either of the bikes you mentioned).

If you will be training with a group and/or in moderate to heavy traffic, stick with STI brake/shifter combo with a standard road bar and clip on (neither of the bikes you mentioned, but both manufactuers make fine road race bikes).

As far as which bike, the bikes you listed are all way over kill, but if it's what you want, then go for either.

Pro's You will see a few Cervelos at every race you enter. You will not see too many of the Ordu's, at least I have not.

Con's These bikes are pretty specific. If you change your mind and want to turn roadie, you may have another bike purchase in your near future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input!
Yes, I'm new to road biking. I've been using my road bike (Tomac Revolver) for training. Just thought I'd move up. Great advice!!! It means a lot to get this kind of thorough input and I really appreciate it.
Robert
 

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kendo said:
Thanks for the input!
Yes, I'm new to road biking. I've been using my road bike (Tomac Revolver) for training. Just thought I'd move up. Great advice!!! It means a lot to get this kind of thorough input and I really appreciate it.
Robert
we try to keep tri specific stuff in the racing/tri forum. you'll get more of an audience and the topic won't be cycled down as fast...
 

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On your left!
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The Tomac

is a mtn rig, right? So this will be your first road bike then?

Wow, get ready to spend a lot less time on the trails. Road cycling and especially (for me anyway) time trialing and tri/du racing is awesome.

Do you have any friends who are experienced cyclists? Getting the right rig and I hate to say it, but bike fit is crucial (bike fit occurs in every 2.5 posts here and causes some ribbing around here, so use the term wisely). You already know that from mtn cycling...So unless you have someone to help with questions, I'd start looking for a good bike shop to partner up with.

Maybe start off with the Cervelo Dual, a good bike that offers a bit more variation in the seat angle. This may be even more important to someone whose legs are accustomed to the laid back angles of mtn biking.

Let us know more about your road cycling background and riding conditions where you live and we can offer a bit more advice. Welcome to the land of burning quads and lungs...:thumbsup:
 

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racerx said:
For sprints, I'd recommend going more light weight rather than heavy on the super aero.
Unless the bike leg starts at the bottom and finishes at the top of a steep climb, aero benefits will far outweigh any weight penalty they include.

racerx said:
No disc wheel, rather a mid or deep front and at most a mid rear.
I can't imagine any circumstance where a mid deep rear would be a better choice than a disk. Given new disk wheels can be had for under $500.00 and spoke covers for less than $100.00, a solid rear wheel should be high on the list of aero equipment (after aero helmet, skin suit, and deep front wheel).
 

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Aero results are absolutely correct...

asgelle said:
Unless the bike leg starts at the bottom and finishes at the top of a steep climb, aero benefits will far outweigh any weight penalty they include.


I can't imagine any circumstance where a mid deep rear would be a better choice than a disk. Given new disk wheels can be had for under $500.00 and spoke covers for less than $100.00, a solid rear wheel should be high on the list of aero equipment (after aero helmet, skin suit, and deep front wheel).

Just considering that this person is new to the sport and may want to ride with a club. I wouldn't recommend showing up with a club ride in full tri set up or showing up at the next sprint tri with skinsuit, super aero helmet, shoe covers and etc...Think beginner...
 

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Which one fits...

You listed two bikes that you'd like to purchase, but it all comes down to fit. Make sure you get fitted properly as that will make the most difference. Otherwise, the difference between the two bikes is pretty small, performance wise. A good aero position will do you wonders right out of the gate. Enjoy...
 

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Want More Bang For the Buck?

You really should consider Javelin Bikes. They have more models of tri frames than I think any other manufacturer. They had 3 Top Bike Picks in the April 06 Triathlete mag. The Parma for newbies is excellent. You get a more of a road style frame in a matt black, with a Zero carbon fork, Campy 9 speed, and Oval stem and aero bars for around a grand! Then when you get good the Barolo is a top of the line race machine that can be bought fully loaded for less than most big name frames, and it was a top pick bike.
 

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I vote for the Cervelo. On my Cervelo One, I can easily pull away from my usual riding partner, and it really isn't that difficult to climb with that bike as well. For an alumnium bike, it is surprisingly supple, and the internal cable routing is a work of art.

In short, the bike is fast, easy to handle and during my last time trail, I managed 40 km/h over 21 km. I can't imagine doing that with a regular road bike. There is a reason why Cervelo is one of the most popular time trial manufacturers. Take one out for a test ride, and I can guarantee you will NOT be disappointed.

Ming
 
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