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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I thought I would post this here and see if anyone has any expert insight.

I just can't seem to get comfortable on my current road frame (a Trek 2300 frame).

I have been measured with fit kit, etc.. and I know the fitting was done well but it was not done for this bike. I'm not sure what the heck is going on but I was very comfortable on the original bike the fitting was done for (Giant TCR) but even if I set this bike up exactly the same I can't seem to get it right.

My only real fit "issue" of note is I have repeatedly given myself tendonitis in my right knee. If my saddle is too low I will begin feeling knee discomfort quite quickly. We are talking 7-9mm too low and I can feel it. I've been riding for 6 years, at this point I'm hypersensitive to saddle height. Otherwise I'm in good shape and I have good flexibility.

However at the same time *on this frame* I have a very hard time with saddle comfort when I have the saddle at the proper height to make my knees (and power output) correct.

Any guide on what little things I can try? I've tried quite a few saddles and they don't seem to matter. Lowering tire pressure definitely helps within reason, but not enough, and I am not an extreme "high pressure" guy, I usually run around 112-115psi.

Is there any rule "if you feel this", "move this" when it comes to the saddle? e.x. with the saddle level I feel too much pressure from the nose of the saddle when I'm in the drops, should I raise or lower the front of the saddle to shift my weight back onto the sitbones?

I didn't like having a super expensive bike but I was so comfortable on the Giant I had it makes me wish I had never sold it. I've been mucking around with the fit very carefully on my Trek for 2 years now and it never seems to get to that magic comfort zone.
 

· Alien Musician
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Remember the Giant is a compact frame and the Trek is a standard frame which
could change things subtly.

Maybe you should sell the Trek and seek out another Giant if that worked for you?

It doesn't make sense to change things out if they worked even if it is for financial
reasons - you'll always take a loss on selling what you saved for.

And if after two years the Trek isn't doing it for you, it's probably time to move on.
 

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the fit kit is only the starting point and a very general one at that. if you tilt the nose down on the saddle you'll place more weight on your hands and may cause numbness. Sounds like you need to take this bike to the LBS and be sized for it. Take it to the place that sized you for the giant.
 

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I would do this

I would post a question on www.cyclingnews.com and see that Steve Hogg says. If your Trek frame is correct size for your body then it will be a matter of finding the correct saddle height and fore/aft position (critical), then stem/spacers and cleats. If you have a problem on just one leg then perhaps you need a lemond wedge or a shim, assuming the saddle height is correct. Saddle height depends on sadle fore/aft position.

re tyre pressure, it depends on your weight. I assume this is not for racing, clincher tyres of 700*23C. In this case 110psi may be too high if you weigh under 150# and may be a bit too low if you weigh > 200#. I weigh 145# and ride 100psi and even on 90psi I do not get pinch flats. On 110psi I notice that ride comfort is worse and my performance is no better. So for me 100psi seems to be optimal, for my 145#

I have a Trek Madone which is similar geometry to Trek 2x00 and 1x00 and I know they have relatively long top tube and relatively short head and seat tube which means that transferring from a completely different frame like a compact Giant to Trek can be tricky.
 

· You're Not the Boss of Me
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I'd suspect that it may be your actual saddle, combined with saddle height, that is screwing with your biomechanics. Is this the same saddle that you used on the Giant, and set at the same height (vis a vis the bottom bracket) AND at the same angle?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes I've tried the exact same saddle at the exact same height & angle. The bike has been re-fitted and setup to fit just like the giant by the same shop I bought the giant from. They did say the Giant was better geometry for me but they also openly hate Trek and any bike which was not bought at their shop.

I don't really have any issues with my hands/neck/back but could the bar height affect my saddle comfort considering moving the bars can affect the tilt of your hips?

Thanks for the suggestions everyone. Always tough but maybe I should look into selling it. Unfortunately I have multiple bike disorder so I am of course reluctant to buy anything else and it's always a PITA to sell something.
 

· duh...
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jtolleson said:
I'd suspect that it may be your actual saddle, combined with saddle height, that is screwing with your biomechanics. Is this the same saddle that you used on the Giant, and set at the same height (vis a vis the bottom bracket) AND at the same angle?

If it's the same saddle it should be easy to replicate the old position, provided the crank lengths are the same. Just make sure you have the same height, same angle, AND same setback from the BB (with bike level, drop a plumb line from the nose). Once that is established, you can match the 'cockpit' by measuring bar reach and height (again can drop a plumb line from bars and measure horizontal projection from BB; for height just measure bars to ground and subtract BB height).
 

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Fit by top tube

Bikes should be fit according to the top tube, when using a simple rule of thumb. It doesn't matter how tall you are, its the reach that counts after having your saddle adjusted fore-aft.

If you are having comfort issues, then a very good place to look is your saddle position. I'm guessing that your saddle is too far forward. Try moving it back (I hope you have a setback seatpost). Depending on your body, you will find this moves the pressure more onto your sit-bones and off your public bones. The height and tilt doesn't have as much affect as the fore-aft position. Once you set your saddle back, put it level to start. And remember that a tilt down on the front is bad for 99% of people. If anything there should be a slight tilt back, but level is usually best.

I'm 6'2", and had a 58cm Cannondale. After mucking around with its fit for 3 years and vnever finding a good spot, I sold it to get a 56cm Cannondale and found that comfort spot really easily with the combined realization that I needed a really far back saddle (due to long femurs). Once my saddle was back, the 56cm top tube gave me a comfortable reach I couldn't achieve in the 58cm.
 

· duh...
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stevecaz said:
Bikes should be fit according to the top tube, when using a simple rule of thumb.

that's too simple... you assume that the STA is the same on both frames. If not, 2 bikes with the same TT length can fit differently.
 

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common sense will tell you that 2 different bikes made differently will fit differently. A good fitter is supposed to fit you to the bike you purchased. At leat that is what my fitter did the fabulous fabish fit.......:)
 
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