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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
LyncStar said:
Curious as to whether anyone on the board has done this event. Also curious as to what would be typical time finishes for Cat 3 and 4 riders for this race. For those not "in the know," the Triple Bypass is a 120 mile ride from Evergreen, CO to Avon, CO. Very popular in these parts as it isn't very challenging from a climbing perspective. That said, it does go over three passes, but nothing much above a 7-8% climb.
Yeah...done it 4-5 times. It's getting pretty crowded these days. Nothing over 8%, but it is 120 miles and 10k+ vertical of climbing. If you're in decent shape I'd say 8 hours or so to finish is average. BTW--it ain't a race. It's a ride. If you want a climbing race try the Bob Cook hill climb which is about the same time of year and goes from Idaho Spgs to the top of Mt. Evans--14k+ feet elevation.
 

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Curious as to whether anyone on the board has done this event. Also curious as to what would be typical time finishes for Cat 3 and 4 riders for this race. For those not "in the know," the Triple Bypass is a 120 mile ride from Evergreen, CO to Avon, CO. Very popular in these parts as it isn't very challenging from a climbing perspective. That said, it does go over three passes, but nothing much above a 7-8% climb.
 

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what's the allure?

not trying to be a [email protected], but I'm just wondering what the allure is of something like the triple bypass? I get why one would want to do an organized endurance mountain bike ride (Leadville/Vail 100) to get support and getting lost in the mountains for the day without worrying about truly getting lost. But on a road bike there are always stores you can stop in at and signs on the road everywhere telling you where to go. it's not a race, so why not just head out the door?
 

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its fun

geneseo said:
not trying to be a [email protected], but I'm just wondering what the allure is of something like the triple bypass? I get why one would want to do an organized endurance mountain bike ride (Leadville/Vail 100) to get support and getting lost in the mountains for the day without worrying about truly getting lost. But on a road bike there are always stores you can stop in at and signs on the road everywhere telling you where to go. it's not a race, so why not just head out the door?
you meet people from all over... and its fun, I rode for 12 mles with andy H. and talked about the Tour de France it was pretty cool. Plus you get on of th ugliest jersey you could ever want.
 

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i agree... if you want a tough climbing race this one takes the cake...
record time on that baby is somthing like 1:41:20 by Tom Danielson
then there is me strolling in 42 min later then that this last year.
and by strolling i mean lightheaded, thirsty and dead tired.

another good uphill race is the mike horgan HC. From Boulder to Eldora. complete with dirt sections and a 17% short pitch near the start.
 

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Yes, ride not a race.

I only emphasize this so you don't expect a placing.

This ride is great, absolutely one of the only rides I would do. It's challenging even for experienced racers. Great climbs, great decents. Most local racer finish between 7 and 8 hours of ride time. Once you hit the top of Vail pass and you're completely spent and realize there's still 20 miles to go and there's a headwind on what is supposed to be a fun down hill with some flats, it can test the most seasoned cyclist. And then if you get a late start chances are good that it will rain or snow on you. Then if it's hot you have to watch out for dehydration. Last time I rode it, 2003, I was cracked when I hit Breck, it took about 12 slices of melon for me to feel ok.

And on top of the epic nature of the ride, it's really well organized.
 

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What's this fixation with "race" v. "ride"?

geneseo said:
not trying to be a [email protected], but I'm just wondering what the allure is of something like the triple bypass? I get why one would want to do an organized endurance mountain bike ride (Leadville/Vail 100) to get support and getting lost in the mountains for the day without worrying about truly getting lost. But on a road bike there are always stores you can stop in at and signs on the road everywhere telling you where to go. it's not a race, so why not just head out the door?
It's a fun social event, well supported with a party at the end. What's not to like? Plus you do get that really ugly jersey. No one is claiming it is a race, jeesh. One might ask, what is the point of doing a "race" if you aren't getting paid? By the way, the Triple is also an excellent training ride for the LT100.
 

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I'm w/ geneseo - I live in CO but have never done the ride but know plenty who have. You get to ride along side of I-70 on a frontage road, or right along the interstate for about 1/3 of it, and there are a ton of people - a ton of triple cranks, a ton of camelbaks, a ton of visors on helmets & a ton of people going slow on the descents - which is fine for those folks but not my cup 'o tea.

A good ride you can do unsupported is from Denver to the top of Mt Evans and back - it's 120 miles w/ 10K of climbing.

Let's just say that the TBP jerseys & those who wear them don't have the best connotations......
 

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Let's just say that the TBP jerseys & those who wear them don't have the best connotations......[/QUOTE said:
Quite true but very unfortunate. These people are on the cusp. They have taken the leap to try something way out of their comfort range into the cycling world. Too many riders blow them off as a 'Fred' where we really all need to act as an ambassador to the sport. At some point we were all pretty goofy on the bike but I'll bet all of us can look back and finger a couple people that helped you both understand the sport more and love it.
 

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Forgive them Lord for they know not what they say...

The Carlster said:
I'm w/ geneseo - I live in CO but have never done the ride but know plenty who have. You get to ride along side of I-70 on a frontage road, or right along the interstate for about 1/3 of it, and there are a ton of people - a ton of triple cranks, a ton of camelbaks, a ton of visors on helmets & a ton of people going slow on the descents - which is fine for those folks but not my cup 'o tea.

A good ride you can do unsupported is from Denver to the top of Mt Evans and back - it's 120 miles w/ 10K of climbing.

Let's just say that the TBP jerseys & those who wear them don't have the best connotations......
A third of the ride is not along I-70. Maybe about 3 miles of it is. Regarding the gapers that do the ride, that's true, but who cares? There also are a lot of hot chicks but you'd probably be too busy checking out your shaved legs and scrotum to notice. Regarding people going slow on downhills, that's never been a problem for me as you go early and fast. Perhaps your buddies are just plodders that get caught up with the masses, which says a heck of a lot more about them and you than the event.

By the way, I'd love to know how you ride from Denver to the top of ME without riding on a highway. I'm all ears, errr, eyes.

Peace and try not to be soooo judgmental.
 

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dfleck said:
Let's just say that the TBP jerseys & those who wear them don't have the best connotations......[/QUOTE said:
Quite true but very unfortunate. These people are on the cusp. They have taken the leap to try something way out of their comfort range into the cycling world. Too many riders blow them off as a 'Fred' where we really all need to act as an ambassador to the sport. At some point we were all pretty goofy on the bike but I'll bet all of us can look back and finger a couple people that helped you both understand the sport more and love it.
Yeah, what he said! What is a "Fred?" Is that double secret non-pro cycling lingo?
 

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LyncStar said:
Yeah, what he said! What is a "Fred?" Is that double secret non-pro cycling lingo?
in order for me to reveal the defination of a "Fred" i'll have to see a copy of your UCI liscense. Its just a formality. You will also have to sign an affidavit stating you won't reveal this to anyone below a UCI Div. III level.

Just a rider that apears to lack either knowlege, experience but most likely, both.

Most likely Lance is the only racer they could name.

They wear underware under their padded shorts.

Their bike is louder then a yipping lap dog

ect.
 

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Huh?

The Carlster said:
I'm w/ geneseo - I live in CO but have never done the ride but know plenty who have. You get to ride along side of I-70 on a frontage road, or right along the interstate for about 1/3 of it, and there are a ton of people - a ton of triple cranks, a ton of camelbaks, a ton of visors on helmets & a ton of people going slow on the descents - which is fine for those folks but not my cup 'o tea.

A good ride you can do unsupported is from Denver to the top of Mt Evans and back - it's 120 miles w/ 10K of climbing.

Let's just say that the TBP jerseys & those who wear them don't have the best connotations......
I've always thought that if they could have a select group of 200 racers that they staged before the ride goes off it would be a great course for a race. If you've never done this ride, you really can't comment on it. Most the racers that I know consider it a quality ride and often have a tough time deciding whether to do that ride or whatever race is scheduled for that day. I totally agree with you about the jerseys, I gave away 3 of them at veloswap. But to not do a ride cause of all the rec. riders is just plain silly. I did the Etape du Tour last year, it's a race, but there were just as many fred's doing that as the Triple and I think the Triple was harder.
 

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dfleck said:
in order for me to reveal the defination of a "Fred" i'll have to see a copy of your UCI liscense. Its just a formality. You will also have to sign an affidavit stating you won't reveal this to anyone below a UCI Div. III level.

Just a rider that apears to lack either knowlege, experience but most likely, both.

Most likely Lance is the only racer they could name.

They wear underware under their padded shorts.

Their bike is louder then a yipping lap dog

ect.
Figured that was it. By the way, who is this "Lance" and what are padded shorts? I usually just where cutoffs, Buster Browns and black knee socks.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
LyncStar said:
Yeah, what he said! What is a "Fred?" Is that double secret non-pro cycling lingo?
I call BS here--anyone fit enough to finish the TBP is a in great shape. Maybe you can fred your way though Elephant Rock, but don't show up to TBP unprepared and out of shape or you won't finish.

// PLUS...added bonus as someone mentioned below--TONS of hot chicks on the ride compared to most organized rides.
 

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Triple Bypass - A few more thoughts....

Most importantly, with net proceeds from the Triple Bypass, we at Team Evergreen to donate about 60-70K on average the last few years (90K in 2005) to local charities. If the ride didn't make money, I doubt we'd do it. Some of those charities man the support stations - for example Special Olympics is at the Loveland station. Its really cool. Its about a lot more than just a ride - its social. The terrain is great (ok, so there is 4-5 miles along I-70). A lot of people - TE members and volunteers get involved including the sponsors and their employees. Its challenging, no - make that super challenging, for a lot of people - we get riders from over 40 states. Everybody gets together at the end of the ride for a lot of food and drink. A lot riders have family or friends go along for support and take pics and whatever - even though its fully supported by Team Evergreen.

Sure, if you want to hammer the 120miles, go to it, it is a challenge. A lot of us can do it pretty easily in sub-7hrs. And a few people do that, but most are there to enjoy the day - rain or shine or even snow occasionally. Riding in a snow squall in July - more than one person will write home about that!

Cheers -
 

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Discussion Starter #17
carver said:
A lot of us can do it pretty easily in sub-7hrs.
Cheers -
And there are also those that are still coming into the finish 14 hours after they started...it always amazes me to see people still coming down Vail Pass when I've already drank some beers, eaten my food and am heading home for the day.

/ Last year I was in awful shape and took nearly 9 hours to finish. Copper Mountain on was a death march for me. Much more fun when you're in good shape.
 

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LyncStar said:
A third of the ride is not along I-70. Maybe about 3 miles of it is. Regarding the gapers that do the ride, that's true, but who cares? There also are a lot of hot chicks but you'd probably be too busy checking out your shaved legs and scrotum to notice. Regarding people going slow on downhills, that's never been a problem for me as you go early and fast. Perhaps your buddies are just plodders that get caught up with the masses, which says a heck of a lot more about them and you than the event.

By the way, I'd love to know how you ride from Denver to the top of ME without riding on a highway. I'm all ears, errr, eyes.

Peace and try not to be soooo judgmental.

I generally agree with LyncStar, and as a 42 y/o female rec rider who, yes, has a TRIPLE, the above kind of snot-nosed crap gets old. I've done 3 of these babies and think it is a great challenging day for the recreational roadie... all the way from the 6 hr. finishers to the 14 hr. finishers and those of us who fall somewhere in between. But if the a-hole hardcores want to look down their noses and stay away, that's okay with me too.

As for how much of the ride is along I-70... depends what you mean by "along I-70." You are on the actual interstate shoulder for just under 4 miles (Bakerville to Loveland ski area) but then from Idaho Springs to Bakerville you're on the I-70 frontage road (that's about another 20 miles). Then from Frisco into Vail you are on that great Summit County bike path which parallels, but isn't right on, I-70. So, maybe 1/3 of the Triple is "along I-70."

That being said, the I-70 frontage road is a bit away from the highway and follows Clear Creek a bunch of the way, etc. You definitely don't feel like you are riding on the Highway. And the bike path stretches (Frisco to Vail) are likewise very beautiful and fairly quiet.
 

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Its Brutal to see that...

Bocephus Jones II said:
And there are also those that are still coming into the finish 14 hours after they started...it always amazes me to see people still coming down Vail Pass when I've already drank some beers, eaten my food and am heading home for the day.

/ Last year I was in awful shape and took nearly 9 hours to finish. Copper Mountain on was a death march for me. Much more fun when you're in good shape.
Last year heading home about 4pm I think, on Vail Pass it was absolutely pouring rain and the temps had to be in the 30's or low 40's. And plenty of riders coming down. Yikes. A testament to perseverance and "getting it done".
 

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Ditto

jtolleson said:
I generally agree with LyncStar, and as a 42 y/o female rec rider who, yes, has a TRIPLE, the above kind of snot-nosed crap gets old. I've done 3 of these babies and think it is a great challenging day for the recreational roadie... all the way from the 6 hr. finishers to the 14 hr. finishers and those of us who fall somewhere in between. But if the a-hole hardcores want to look down their noses and stay away, that's okay with me too.

As for how much of the ride is along I-70... depends what you mean by "along I-70." You are on the actual interstate shoulder for just under 4 miles (Bakerville to Loveland ski area) but then from Idaho Springs to Bakerville you're on the I-70 frontage road (that's about another 20 miles). Then from Frisco into Vail you are on that great Summit County bike path which parallels, but isn't right on, I-70. So, maybe 1/3 of the Triple is "along I-70."

That being said, the I-70 frontage road is a bit away from the highway and follows Clear Creek a bunch of the way, etc. You definitely don't feel like you are riding on the Highway. And the bike path stretches (Frisco to Vail) are likewise very beautiful and fairly quiet.
Yeah, you go (Jen, is it??)!! Why, there might even be people (gasp) taking pictures or chatting with friends or even having fun!!!!
 
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