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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just curious to know how everyone else fared yesterday.

We took off at about 5:30 in overcast weather and stayed dry until Echo Lake when the skies opened up. The skies of course did not stop unitl the last traffic circle in West Vail.

Our first stop was the Loveland ski area (right at 4 hours) and my legs were popsicles - I didn't think of bringing knee warmers. Thankfully our fears of snow at the top of Loveland Pass did not come true - but it was far from warm. We ended up getting behind a semi and I, and my co-riders, almost wore our brakes out. I was also shivering on the downhills with only underjersey, arm warmers and light rain jacket - thankfully full finger gloves.

Vail Pass was painless and quick stop at the aid station for some Oreos and we were off.

We hit the finish at 8 hours and 4 minutes - just over our 8 hour target. Not too bad considering the weather and being wet for nearly 6 hours.

Overall, thanks to all the volunteers and the guys I rode with.
 

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Still waiting......
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Wet Triple

I didn't make it this year for the first time in a long time. Sounds like I picked a good year to skip.

I did have 5 friends that attempted it and got the report from them last night. They got a late start, 7:30 or so. It was raining pretty hard in Bergen Park when they rolled out. It rained on them all the way up Squaw Pass. Two of them were already frozen, so they turned around near the top of Squaw. The other 3 continued over Squaw and then froze on the descent. The 2 that bailed early grabbed the cars, and met the other 3 in Idaho Springs for breakfast. They had a condo in Avon, so they drove out there, showered, warmed up and then went to the Red Lion in Vail and drank a lot of beer.

I was checking out the CDOT cameras online quite a bit yesterday. It looked pretty bad on the whole route.

Congrats on finishing, and in an amazing time considering the conditions.
 

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Congrats on finishing the TBP!! We started at 7:00am and made good time to Juniper. The descent proved too much. With light rain jacket and half finger gloves, I felt I was riding on square wheels from shivering. We bailed at Idaho Springs with the rumour of snow at Loveland and heavy rain after. Big time bummer for my first TBP. Next Year!!
 

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This was my sixth Triple, and easily the worst of the lot in every way. 4 of us showed up at the start, one DNS because of flu like symptoms (good call on his part) and three of us made the start at about 6:20. The misty rain started soon after turning to a serious rain near the top of Squaw. We all made it to Idaho Springs cold and shaking. My two friends bailed, but I changed into a dry jersey and socks and set out again and with better (wool ) arm and leg warmers. It rained all the way to Loveland rest stop, sometimes pretty heavily. I switched socks again, got a bite to eat, and made for the top. The rain let up as I made the last push, but increased as I made the descent. I again warmed up, this time in Keystone, changed socks one more time and got to the HS in good shape. After a quick feed I pushed on to Copper and Vail Pass. The rain continued, but it wasn't quite as miserable as it had been. At the top of Vail, I switched into a dry jersey and my last set of socks. The ride into Vail and Avon was a breeze compared to the rest of the day. The rain let up and some parts of the trail were actually dry as was I. It took me 11 hours total, a good deal of it spent warming up. Im not sure of actual ride time, but it was probably about 8.5 to 9 hours. I'd estimate that it rained on about 75 to 80% of the route, and it was wet for about 90%. If I hadn't had 4 pairs of socks, two extra jerseys and the spare arm and leg warmers, I never would have made it. I think keeping your feet dry was a key to comfort, I envied all the people I saw with booties.

I would estimate that I saw about 50 or more people with flats, and it couldn't have been much fun changing tubes in the cold rain. At Loveland it was 49 degrees, and coming down there were places where the road was literally covered in about a half inch of water which was running down the road in sheets with waves. If that wasn't enough, during the ride I had to stop twice because my headset had gotten loose. The second time, the on road repair guys from REI fixed it. I told them I was shivering so violently that the headset got loose, that wasn't far from the truth.

I'll probably do it again next year, call me stupid.

Birddog
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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Perhaps a blessing in disguise to "cool off" an event that was getting overwhelmed by "anyone can do it" popularity. I skipped this year as well (having recently moved away) but also heard from some friends who bailed due to cold. I also heard a rumor of the course ultimately "closing" ... true?

But I can't imagine riding the TBP without knee or leg warmers as someone above mentioned, even in a better forecast. It is still 125+ miles including lots at altitude...
 

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j-dawg
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SAG Report

I had an interesting view of the Triple this year: I drove one of the SAG wagons. It was my job to sweep the course from Evergreen to the second aid station.

My day started with an alarm at 3:30. I was at my buddy's house by 4:15 (he was riding in the Triple) and we were on our way by 4:30. Traffic was remarkably smooth (I guess it was 5 in the morning!) and we rolled into Evergreen about 6. I dropped my buddy off and waited around til about 7:00. At that point someone approached me and wanted a ride. A little curious I thought to get SAGed from the start but who was I to ask. So we started up the course. This was actually the worst part of my day because I had to drive in the left lane the entire way up hoping that there were no cars coming down! I stopped 3-4 times to help people with flats and give out tubes. I picked up one more on the way to Aid #1 who had a mechanical. I got to Aid 1 about 8:15 and it was raining and a whopping 45 degrees according to my car. I filled pretty quickly with folks wanting to go back down to Evergreen. I tried to get back to the first Aid station 2 more times but filled both times and hauled people back to Evergreen. I finally started my 'sweep' from Aid 1 at 11:00. I probably saw 150-200 people going back down from Aid 1 to Evergreen in my time on that part of the course.

I drove from Aid 1 to Idaho Springs in some of the steadiest rain I've seen in 10 years of living in CO. On the way from IS to GT I passed about 25 people, all who had relatively high spirits. This worried me a little because I knew the aid station at GT was closing at 12:30 and it was about 12:20. I zoomed ahead to let the aid station know there were riders still out and then went back as far as Downieville. The nice part of being a SAG is you can stop at Starbucks and not lose any time :)

I got back to the GT aid station and gathered up 2 people to take up to Loveland (Aid 3). I passed probably 30 people on the way up and picked up 1 more, who then got out at one point to let someone else in. I left Aid 3 and headed up Loveland Pass. I got there around 3 and the weather was the nicest I had seen yet: about 55 degrees and cloudy. But that changed by 3:30 when the rain moved in again. I fiiled with 3 more folks looking to get a ride. More rain all the way to Keystone where I stopped to get my free slice of pizza from Basil Doc's. Good pizza by the way. I think the sun may have shone for a few minutes on Swan Mtn. Rd. I ended up at Summit HS about 4:45. About that time my buddy called to tell me he had made it to Vail Pass and was heading for Avon. Woo-hoo! I had two takers to get the ride to Avon and we made the quick trip over. I rolled in to Avon about 5:30 and waited for the finish line photo of my buddy. He pulled in on the bike path right around 6:00, wet but still in good spirits and glad to be done.

We got his bike to the car and hit the food. Pretty standard outdoor BBQ but it definitely hit the spot. We finally started back home about 7:15 and we got home by 10:30. What a long day!

Interesting observations of the day:
* Most people at the back of the pack were in remarkably good spirits.
* My favorite clothing ensemble was the guy in full ski outfit. Ski pants, parka, and, yes, goggles!
* It's amazing what you can 'engineer' with a few trash bags, some sandwich bags and latex gloves to stay warm
* 3 Diet Cokes, a Diet Dr. Pepper and a grande mocha from Starbucks exceeds my stomach's capacity to handle caffeine. Yuck!
* Favorite bikes of the day: Colnago C50 (full Record), steel Black Sheep, co-Motion tandem with S&S couplers, too many Moots to count!, and a shameless plug for my buddy's Tiemeyer

I hope to be there next year, this time on the bike instead of the car ... unless the weather is like yesterday ;)

j
 

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a soggy first triple bypass...

My friends (aka 'Band of Brothers') and I left Bergen Park at 6.15 Saturday morning to begin our first attempt at the Triple Bypass. About 30 minutes later, my worst fears were confirmed-- it began to rain on us. At the top of Juniper pass, someone at the aid station asked me if I happen to know the temperature. I looked on my cycle computer to see that it read a cozy 46 degrees. The descent down to Idaho Springs was the most miserable of the day. I was shivering most of the way down telling myself "the descent is always the coldest. Wait to decide on bailing until after we reach the bottom." Sure enough, it warmed up enough by Idaho Springs that we decided to continue. And by the time we reached Georgetown, I was warm enough that I felt soggy, but able to continue. Our wives (aka 'Wives of Brothers') met us at Georgetown and gave us a nice boost.

Up until that point, I felt pretty strong. But between Georgetown and Loveland, my legs started to tighten a bit. At loveland, Wives of Brothers met us again. We hopped in the car and changed into dry socks and gloves. I'm telling you-- latex gloves on top of my wet gloves saved me Saturday! I was wet, but the rubber gloves kept the wind off of my hands and allowed my body to warm up the water enough that I was able to go on.

At Loveland, one of our group was told "the sun is shining on the other side of Loveland Pass." Of course this guy must have meant 'on the other side of Loveland pass plus another 50 miles the sun is shining.' I felt strong going up Loveland, but had the pleasant experience of being sleeted on. Our dry socks and gloves stayed dry maybe 20 minutes. The descent was cold, but not as bad as coming down Juniper pass. About halfway down, i realized that i wasn't shivering as I had expected to and i thought 'maybe i can actually finish this thing.' By Swan Mountain, with the help of several gels, I was downright giddy (probably a sugar/caffeine high...). We made it to Summit High School, loaded up on chocolate chip/peanut butter sandwiches and headed off the Vail Pass. I've ridden Vail Pass before and it's definitely one of the easiest passes in Colorado. But boy was I feeling it Saturday! I managed to flat somewhere between Copper and the summit, but after fixing that, we limped up to the top of Vail Pass. We grabbed some fluids and food and headed down to Avon. I was wet, but the adrenaline kicked in when we saw semi-dry roads for the first time all day. So we kicked it into gear on the descent and formed a paceline pretty much all the way to Avon. Our wonderful Wives of Brothers were there at the finish smilling and cheering to welcome us home.

On the drive home Sunday, the rain kicked in again. My stomach knotted up as I remembered the soggy, miserable day we had on Saturday. I'm glad we finished, but i sure hope i don't have to ride 110 out of 120 miles in the rain again any time soon!

jim
 

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Ahhhh, what a day for my first triple! Weather was about as crappy as could be. Left BP about 7am. Met wife and kids in GT and put on some dry socks - and they stayed dry for about 10 minutes! Had lunch with the fam at Loveland aid, in the car trying to warm up. Still soaked, I left there shivering but hammered on. Got pelted with sleet or hail about the whole ride bombing down loveland pass, only braking for slow driving vehicles - which ended up being a lot of braking. Weather cleared a bit past Copper and the descent from Vail pass on in was mostly clear of rain allowing a clean sprint all the way to the finish. Arrived in Avon just before 4pm - less then 8 hrs in the saddle but nearly 9 hours total time with extended stops. Organization, aid stations, and course support was terrific (including police allowing bikers a free pass through Vail roundabouts). No chairs at finish line to eat my double cheeseburger was my only complaint. Right forearm muscle is really sore today probably from extended descent braking.
 

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A day to remember...

My first attempt at the Triple and some of the coldest, soggiest miles of my life. We left at 6am, rain started by 630, finally had some dry weather as we climbed Vail pass 95 mi later. We rode the event in 8.5 hrs, not bad considering how much the rain slowed you down on all the descents. I rode many of them with brakes fully depressed and pedaling at the same time to generate warmth. The weather totally flipped around your priorities, you dreaded the cold stinging descents and looked forward to the long ,blood pumping climbs. Squaw was definitely the worst, very cold, those that bailed in Idaho Springs(some shaking violently), may have underestimated the ability to keep warm on the long climb up to Loveland. My wife and kids were there with dry socks, booties, new shorts and bags of gear, but I continued on dressed pretty light to stay comfy on the climbs. Pretty cold coming into Frisco, but those choc chip Pnut butter sandwiches made my day, I must have eaten a dzn. Though I burned over 5000cal, like other long events, I gained over 3 lbs with all the carbo loading the past couple days. A sure fire way to put on a few lbs-ride 8-9hrs in cold rain and climb10,000'. Vail Pass descent was orgasmic-dry roads, warm, our energy returned. We got in a great pace line and were blasting through the round abouts at 25+mph. 4 mi to the finish, leading the pace line, I got my 2nd blowout of the day. They dropped me like a stone. Like others commented, I saw at least 50 flats being repaired. 2 folks reported tacks on Squaw-sickos trying to spoil our fun. Overall the day reminded me of a favorite Mark Twight(extreme alpinist) quote "It doesn't have to be fun to be fun".

Look forward to next year! And props to the organizers and fans along the route, awesome job, thanks for your help and support!
 

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sounds like y'all earned that ride. It is a tough ride even in good weather.
 

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$4000 bike - two bit legs
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Why do we do this??

Bocephus Jones II said:
sounds like y'all earned that ride. It is a tough ride even in good weather.
I enjoyed reading your accounts of TBP. But I have to wonder some times..."why do we do this" I've been there before. But 8-10 hours in the cold, the rain, the sleet, cranking up mountains, freezing on the descents, for what? The pleasure of having completed the ride. We are a bunch of sick MF's !! (That's according to a couple of my non-riding buddies). Great ride guys!
 

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I don't...

I ride these roads all the time, but I had to chuckle thinking about the misery of anyone brave (dumb?) enough to even start riding that day. I'm strictly a fair weather rider since I like to enjoy the weather and scenery. I ONCE road for 1-1/2 hours in rain and swore to never do it again (purposely). Riding mountain descents in the rain is close to insane, IMO.

I have ridden Mt Evans with winds of 30+ at 38 degrees wearing cycling shorts with only an extra long sleeved undershirt and some knit gloves in addition to my jersey. I won't do that again either.
 

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C-40 said:
I ride these roads all the time, but I had to chuckle thinking about the misery of anyone brave (dumb?) enough to even start riding that day. I'm strictly a fair weather rider since I like to enjoy the weather and scenery.
I thought the same thing of my sister who went to run a marathon in Paris on cobblestone streets in a freezing cold rain messing up her achilles in the process...but hey, I don't have the running passion and wouldn't consider the challenge. Same goes for climbing Mt. Everest - I think those people are crazy but I don't have a passion for climbing. Same goes for biking I'd say, there are "fair weather riders" as you call yourself, and there are diehard roadies. The Triple Bypass is not for everyone, especially in adverse conditions.

Maybe there is some sick extreme gene some people have and some don't, and when they get a passion, nothing is going to stop them from trying what others consider dumb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, I basically had to continue since I was staying with, and getting a ride back on Sunday, with friends in Vail. I guess if it got bad enough - and that really is relative because coming down Loveland pass was bad - I could have called someone to come and pick us up. But then I would have stood around for an hour or two and by that time I could have finished what I started. We didn't have anybody SAG'ing for us.

Also, if the Wheatridge Cyclery guys at the Loveland aid station had been selling leg warmers, booties or socks they would have had as much of my money as they had wanted.
 

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i just got back to sonoma county from vail, after a two day marathon drive. this is how my first triple went. after getting my registration package at around 0615, my son, his father in law and myself left evegreen towards squaw. in front of the fire house my son was hit by a firefighter pulling into the fire station. the first climb wasn't bad but by the time we got to idaho springs we were all frozen. we all changed into warmer, dry clothing and continued on. at loveland ski basin i bailed due the conditions going down the pass. my son ( his 2nd.) and his father in law (his 3rd) continued on. i met them at breckinridge and re-joined them for the ride back to eagle/vail. once we left copper the air got drier and the ride from there wasn't too bad. i did see a ton of people bail at juniper and at loveland. it did teach me a lesson and next year i am bringing foul weather gear just in case. but other than that i had a ball. the crowd was great and the ride was well supported.
 

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C-40 said:
I ride these roads all the time, but I had to chuckle thinking about the misery of anyone brave (dumb?) enough to even start riding that day. I'm strictly a fair weather rider since I like to enjoy the weather and scenery. I ONCE road for 1-1/2 hours in rain and swore to never do it again (purposely). Riding mountain descents in the rain is close to insane, IMO.

I have ridden Mt Evans with winds of 30+ at 38 degrees wearing cycling shorts with only an extra long sleeved undershirt and some knit gloves in addition to my jersey. I won't do that again either.
I think that you overstate the situation. Certainly the weather upped the challenge and the skills necessary to safely complete the descent, but it was doable, as many of us proved. I think we all learned a bit about the limits of our abilities, and the gear neeeded to to safely and comfortably negotiate this terrain in this sort of weather. I'd been getting ready for the event for awhile, and I would have been really diappointed if I couldn't complete it. So I did, no regrets. I also enjoy everyone telling me what a rock I am... :D
 

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Post-triple casualty?

I had an odd experience in the Triple -- not with the event itself (very well put together and run) nor even with the weather (rare all-day all-Colorado summer rainstorm) but with an incident that happened on the return.

I froze/washed out at Idaho Springs - nothing in the closet covers 45 degree downpour - but was still intact enough to head back to Evergreen from IS via Floyd Hill. On CO-40 on the Floyd Hill return we (there were a bunch of us) came upon a cyclist down -- he just seemed to keel over about a quarter-mile up 40.

CRP (performed valiantly by the first cyclists on the scene) Police and Rescue Squad didn'[t seem to bring the guy around, and I've seen no mention of it since. Does anyone know what happened here?

It was a somber group of cyclists who tackled Floyd Hill on return...
 
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