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need suggestion on a good durable truing stand. i see the park stand that is $160 (us), looks nice and that what my lbs uses. I don't think my boss(wife) will let me spend that much on one. Are the cheaper ones any good.

would use it on road bike, mountain bike and kids bike.


thanks
 

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Look for a used Park Pro stand

I have a Spin Doctor and it's a POS. The calipers don't stay in position and its not very sturdy... works for minor lateral truing issue. The Park Pro stand is the way to go.
 

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What golzy said. Even if you're in your teens, it's a lifetime purchase. If you buy something inexpensive, you'll probably by the Park later down the road. why pay for two?
 

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The guy at the LBS suggests the TS-2 also; I was asking about the Minoura, which the guy at REI had recommended as a better alternative to the low-end Park that I looked at (a really astonishingly cheesy item; I expected better from Park). Obviously, the shop guy wants to sell me the more expensive TS-2 and therefore might not be totally objective, but this is one of those times that I'm not listening to my natural skepticism and agreeing with him that I'd be better off skipping the Minoura and waiting until I can spare the money for Park.
 

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I'm with you regarding the Park TS-8 Home Mechanic's version. It's something you might tweak a wheel on, but I wouldn't build anything on it.
I'm an 'occasional' wheel builder and some time back, my early 80's era Minoura had become too banged up to do much with, so I sprang for the TS-2. Glad I did. It will likely outlive me and anything I'll build on it. So save up.
 

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You guys will probably think that I am crazy, but I needed a truing stand one time in a hurry and I built one out of 2x4 lumber. I used L brackets to keep the arms at 90 degrees and cut little saw kirfs in the top to hold the axles. I also cut down one edge so that I could true front and rear wheels on the same stand (different spacing). The indicators are provided by two sharpened #2 pencils heald on with rubberbands. When I got done with that I built a dishing tool out of plywood. I have been using this rig for at least 10 years and it works pretty good. Actually I am in the process of building a set of wheels for my fixed gear tonight.
 

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Boyd2, you are in a class of people who can see a problem and figure out a simple mechanical means to deal with it. Other types are good at using tools, but could not think out of the box to create. Both kinds of people are necessary in this society. So, for the people who are handy, build something yourself, it wil work fine. In fact you could simply turn your bike upside down and use the pencil technique on the fork. For those who are tool users, get a good tool like the better-quality Park truing stand.
 

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I have been thinking about my post above for a few minutes. I realized that several things run through my mind when I use my home made truing stand:

1. I am proud of being so cheap.
2. I wish this damm thing would break so that I could buy a park stand.
3. Why didn't I buy the park stand 15 years ago?

Buy the park stand, it is worth the money.
 

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I'm building a truing stand now from an old front fork. I have a welder so it will make the job easier. I have some ideas of a metal plate on the bottom for a base, adjustable bolts on the side for pointers to act as a truing caliper. I'm not sure how it will work out.
 

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lawrence said:
I'm building a truing stand now from an old front fork. I have a welder so it will make the job easier. I have some ideas of a metal plate on the bottom for a base, adjustable bolts on the side for pointers to act as a truing caliper. I'm not sure how it will work out.
Good luck on working with a MTB rear hub or even a rear hub for a road bike. Then you can try a tandem hub, yeah, that's the tikkit!
 

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I thought about building my own truing stand at one point as well. Thought about the 2x4 and hardware, thought about some metal pipes as well. Also using an old front fork as well. Thought about it alot. Figured out how much it was going to cost,etc. Then Perfomance bike had a sale on their Spin Doctor Stand, I think it's on sale now for $30. No it's not shop quality, but it easier to use than doing it on the bike, and probably better than I could make. It's definately worth $30. I was able to take a hop out of a front wheel and properly dish a rear wheel with it (by flipping it over in the stand) also used for regular truing up. Oh, that alignment guage they sell for the stand isn't worth the 7 bucks or so. I got it and I did a better job lining up the stand with a ruler.

by the way here a pic of a truing stand someone made I found on the web at one point. I looked at it for ideas. Maybe it'll inspire you
 

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golzy said:
I have a Spin Doctor and it's a POS. The calipers don't stay in position and its not very sturdy... works for minor lateral truing issue. The Park Pro stand is the way to go.
The calipers don't stay in position because you rims are messed up and need TRUED.

Mine works like a champ and I can true my rims. Its portable. I don't have any place to bolt it down yet, so I don't need a super duper one.

It gets the job done and was inexpensive.
 
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