Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 60 Posts

·
College Student Commuter
Joined
·
190 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,
So I've put on massive pounds in 3 years because of college stress(reckless eating etc. no parties though) and my passion for craft beer(after I turned 21... In 5 months I've put on so much!). I'm gonna try to create a plan to get back on track.
I have a bike from 2010, a Neuvation with Sram Force/Rival groupset and a really nice Garmin computer. I'm scared to take it out because of my weight(considering it's an expensive bike)... How do I go about this? I do feel ashamed... I bet my bibs don't even fit me anymore. I don't want to look like a fred...

Also, any tips on mileage? Like how much miles/week or day do I ride and how much mileage do I gradually add to that as I lose weight?

Thanks guys! I am in need of help.
Please move this thread to an appropriate forum if it's not relevant in General.
 

·
wots...uh the deal?
Joined
·
1,350 Posts
Hi. Many of us get caught up in life and don't ride much for a couple years. I took some time off to couch sit and get heavy, but came back in 2010. Suggestions:
Anything is better than nothing. Get on the bike. Ride. Take it easy, see how far you can go. Go a little further next time. (Ignore your mind when it says "but 20 miles *should* just be a warm up...but do listen to your body)
Gear: Unless your bike/wheelset is advertised as 'super light', you'll probably not have to worry about your weight exceeding the gear. If you're really heavy, get a mtb and ride paved trails for a while.
Bibs. Yes, bibs. They hide the gut. No one wants to have shorts that are folded over by the belly.
Food. Smaller plates, only fill it half way.
Most important is the motivation. Since you're asking, you're motivated. Start riding again. Continue. Make it a lifestyle and not a hobby. But then, you're young and young folks bounce back quickly...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
What do you mean by "massive"(rhetorical)? Roadie massive =200+ or typical America large 300+.

You should contact Neuvation and find out what they recommend as the weight limit on the frame. If you are over than look for a hybrid with high spoke count 700's or 27's and wide rims 30mm tires or larger. You need to get on a bike and ride. Use the Neuvation as a stepping stone prize: "When I loose xx pounds I can ride it again."

Ride what is comfortable at first. Carry the garmin in your pocket the first time so you're focused on how you feel and not your speed or distance. If you can find a route that's pretty flat and has a consistent head wind you can challenge yourself to go a little further knowing you'll have the push for the way home. Record every ride.

Find a organized ride or tour a couple months out and register for 30 -50 miles. Find a training guide to build up to that mileage. This will help you get in the habit of riding.

Off the bike lunges and squats engage the most the largest muscle groups in your body and will help with leg strength for cycling, lots of guides online to help you with form.

Remember: it took time to gain it, it's going to take time to loose it.

And look at this guy Cycle Of Life - Fix You | I used to weigh 39 stone or 560 Lbs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,713 Posts
Put on the biggest tires that the frame will allow, and go ride. the bike won't break. forget the mileage, the computer, etc - ride as long as you feel like, as hard as feels good, eat less, drink less.

So how much did you gain, and how much do you weigh? Let's see some numbers ;-)

Hint: one of the advantages of acquiring a taste for finer things like craft beers is that consuming less can be more satisfying, because they're good. In other words, just because it tastes so great, it doesn't mean you have to drink three of them before dinner. Drink one, slowly, sipping, savoring.

Good luck. You're wise to try to nip these bad habits in the bud at this age. Plenty of guys are trying to get back on track in their late 30's after being overweight and out of shape for 15 years. It's harder then.
 

·
Carbon Fiber = Explode!
Joined
·
3,438 Posts
The hardest part will be starting the regiment and keeping it.

If you are obese, people will unfortunately stare are you even when you are trying to shave off the pounds. This, is a social stigma and huge demotivator for some. If you are able to pass these off just as what they are (nay-sayers and pessimists and narcissists) then you will be fine and you will get the results you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
Great posts here and I'll probably just end up re-iterating much of what has been said, so I'll just try to keep this short.

Without a number (your weight), it's hard to give advice such as what to ride, and how far. I can understand the stigma where weight is concerned, but I am sure there are people on the forum who can relate. It's true I am one of those guys who does not weigh much more than the High School Cheerleader girl, but at the same time, I would not sit here and laugh because someone is over-weight and is asking advice from a veteran rider. I am sure others here feel the same way I do.

First - kudos to you for wanting to get back into shape, and I wish you luck with it. But don't try to over-do it. As has been said, listen to your body. Once you feel the burn, it might be time to stop riding. You don't want that to happen before you've turned around to go back home. Vary your distances at first. It's better to not have gone far enough than to have gone too far, and over-doing it will just tear you down.

I think I'll refrain from other thoughts because as I said, I'll just be re-iterating what was said in the great posts above.

I will mention that I have a friend who is now 43. Five foot eight, and a year and a half ago was 215 pounds and out of shape from inactivity, though has never been a smoker and only a light social drinker. He got a mountain bike and gradually increased his riding. It took time for him to get past the initial 10% or so loss, but after that, the loss was more rapid as his riding increased. Today he is down near my weight of 145 pounds, and in addition to his job, he rides 100+ mile weeks on the road bike he acquired about 6 months ago.

The bottom line is COMMITMENT. I do wish you luck. As has been said earlier, it's going to take some time. As also was said earlier, you are at an age where it should be a bit easier than for someone who is middle-aged.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
It will go like this:

Very Hard
Hard
Not So Bad
Easier
Fun

At which point you would have lost the weight.

Also, if you think college stress is bad, just wait for the rest of your life :) I wish I hadn't taken time off from cycling during my early career days.
 

·
College Student Commuter
Joined
·
190 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies everyone! I'm 21 right now.
I'm about ~210lbs right now, maybe more and I'm only 5'6". Don't have a scale and don't wanna see my weight. My goal is get down to at least 160lbs, which was my weight senior year in high school. I ran track, which is why I managed to keep my weight down. And when I hit 160, my goal is to lose probably 20 lbs more, but that's later on down the road.

The only thing holding me back, which is a minor thing, is how people are going to look at me(Being fat) with a nice bike(in my opinion).
Also, time... I'll probably find a way to ride even with my busy schedule.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
The only thing holding me back, which is a minor thing, is how people are going to look at me(Being fat) with a nice bike(in my opinion).
Also, time... I'll probably find a way to ride even with my busy schedule.
You are setting yourself up for defeat. The most important thing to remember is that you are out there doing it. What other people think is pointless and is nothing you can change. In fact, who is to say that once you lose the weight they won't find something else to say? Start riding, don't worry about others, and above all, have fun!

Life is too short to care that much about what others think. ;)
 

·
College Student Commuter
Joined
·
190 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I barely touched my bike for a long time. Should I change the tubes in it?
Also, what other things should I do to it so I can get it back running smoothly?
The chain lube on it currently is Chain-L applied 2 years ago.

Thanks again everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,713 Posts
Lube the chain. Pump up the tires. Make sure the brakes work. Run the shifters through all the gears a few times and adjust if necessary. Go for a ride.

And I second EVERYTHING DaFlake said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,039 Posts
When I decided to get back into cycling I rode a cheap mountain bike for a while. That might be an easier bridge for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
157 Posts
The only thing holding me back, which is a minor thing, is how people are going to look at me(Being fat) with a nice bike(in my opinion).
Also, time... I'll probably find a way to ride even with my busy schedule.
I yell encouragement to the guy who has to stop and catch his breath half way up the hill. I judge the person who is out of breath after carrying a bucket of KFC to the picnic table.

The nicer bike will make you want to ride more. More time on the bike, the better you'll look on the bike. Get some padded mountain bike shorts until your ass is ready. If you're really worried about it get a indoor trainer. Nothing will make you want to hit the road more than spending an hour riding inside.

Go on some rides with different groups and you will find people who are out of shape and getting back into riding. And most of them will want someone at their level, like you, to ride with. That will also help with the time management: I have to get everything done so I can meet the group for the ride.

Keep your gear ride ready. If you might have time for an hour ride tomorrow, air up your tires, oil your chain, wash your shorts, go buy some more drink mix. Keep all the bike and bike stuff in one place: shoes next to the box with your helmet, water bottles, tools and tubes. Eliminate everything that can delay you getting out the door and on the road.
 

·
College Student Commuter
Joined
·
190 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My bike is at home, which is 3 hrs away, so I'm starting to ride again in about three weeks when I go back home. Just too busy right now with projects and finals.

But I promise you guys, I'll get back to riding once I get my bike back!
Also, are there any bibs with lots of padding? I have a desoto 400-mile and when I started getting back to it again, my ass hurt for a week or so!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
If everyone was worried about what everyone else thought of them, nobody would try anything for the first time, in your case riding at a heavier weight. DON'T BE ASHAMED OF YOURSELF!!! I see way larger people wearing spandex that is so stretched out I can see their pale skin through their spandex. Do I care? No, I don't. If you feel a little awkward at first, wear some board shorts over your bibs and wear a more loose top.

I weighed a hair over 200 lbs about 5 years ago, granted I'm 6-1 so a little different. I was very active, just built a little bigger I guess. I dropped to 165 my first summer on the bike, did nothing different, just rode when I could. Even to the grocery store. I now weigh 155.

I just simply feel better when I ride. Even at 155, I feel like $hit if I don't do anything active. My body craves exercise now. Even if it just walking the dog around the block. The point is, it is about making yourself feel good. No matter what you weigh or what your build is. Riding bikes are fun, get after it! Even if it is a quick 5 mile loop. You'll be hammering it in no time.
 

·
δanned
Joined
·
7,006 Posts
Bikes are designed to hold much more than your estimated weight. Wheels are a different story, but unless you're riding on a 16/20 front-rear combo, I doubt an issue will arise. If you're conscious about your bibs not fitting, maybe you should buy a couple larger pairs, and if you can't afford that just wear regular PT shirts and shorts for the time being. If you really don't want to face the social stigma, just start by walking several miles per day until you feel you're at a comfortable enough weight to start riding again. Either way, don't let anything stop you from achieving your goal. Regarding your diet, it's definitely time to cut out alcohol and other carbs. Unless you plan on doing 50-mile rides daily right out of the gate (which nobody does when they get back into the swing of things), don't even bother with pasta, rice, and potatoes. Cutting out one carb (beer) but leaving the rest is like a smoker who cuts one cigarette per day out of his normal one pack per day. It's technically an improvement, but it's missing the point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,812 Posts
I yell encouragement to the guy who has to stop and catch his breath half way up the hill. I judge the person who is out of breath after carrying a bucket of KFC to the picnic table.
Bingo! Exactly the way I feel and similar to what I was going to say.

I was on a group ride this past weekend. We were riding up a maybe 3% grade coming up on a very overweight woman on a hybrid. She was struggling a lot; God bless her. We slowed up while coming up on her and yelled encouragement. She smiled and pumped her arm in the air.

Hats off to those that put themselves out there and try.
 

·
Cranky Old Bastard
Joined
·
2,337 Posts
I got into cycling at the age of 40, twenty years ago. I weighed about what you do.
I bought the best mountain bike that Toys R Us had in stock ($200).

I didn't have any cycling friends or the internet to talk with cyclists. That really helped me because I rode at my own pace, didn't push too hard and never got discouraged. I took my time and peddled around and quickly got faster and could ride longer and more often. I got hooked.

I bought a cheap cyclometer and was proud the first time my average speed exceeded 10mph for over an hour.
The good thing is that I had no one to discourage me. All that I knew was that I was having fun and losing weight and growing muscle.

I never had a lot of time so could only ride 5 or 6 times a week for an hour each, usually after work.
I did start setting realistic goals and meeting them. Within 6 months I'd lost 50lbs and gotten into the best shape I've ever been in.

So take your time, go as slow as you need to, relax and have fun. If you're still sore take a day off; this isn't about pain or suffering through it.
It is mostly about having fun; the health benefits are wonderful side-effects.
 
1 - 20 of 60 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top