Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
They sit at really forward position, therefore knees will be forward compare with the foot when pushing down. Will that hurt my knee ? I am kind of at middle age too. Or should I sit back and forget about TT.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,853 Posts
I don't know about knee issues but that sure looks like an uncomfortable way to sit.

Perhaps that is why they go so fast; they are in a hurry to get off those awful things.
 

·
Apa kabar?
Joined
·
269 Posts
...lol...

MB1 said:
I don't know about knee issues but that sure looks like an uncomfortable way to sit.

Perhaps that is why they go so fast; they are in a hurry to get off those awful things.
i must agree. i think that this position would be okay for someone who has done plenty of miles to strengthen up both the muscles, and the tendons and ligaments in the knees. not something i would recommend for the beginning cyclist that hasn't put in the miles. i'd also want to make sure i was in a gearing that i could spin more than mash, take a little extra stress of the knees. i'm definitely no expert though, just my thoughts on the matter.
 

·
No Crybabies
Joined
·
11,692 Posts
no

kai-ming said:
They sit at really forward position, therefore knees will be forward compare with the foot when pushing down. Will that hurt my knee ? I am kind of at middle age too. Or should I sit back and forget about TT.
Actually, it's ok for your knees. The position moves your hips forward, but your knees don't know the difference. The knee angle is the same. Also, many people tend to spin when time trialing, anyway, which is better on the knees.

The hardest part about that position is the strain on your neck and how the pressure point on your crotch moves forward. I tried that extreme position on my Cervelo P3 for 100 miles, and my neck was killing me. Anyone could handle it for an hour, though, if they are somewhat used to it, especially when it can be substantially faster.
 

·
Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
Joined
·
9,419 Posts
A couple of months ago, I did some "on the rivet" riding on one of my Saturday rides--I was out with a pal who's training for a TT this summer, and when he got on the TT bars it was my only option apart from letting him drop me. Not. Going. To. Happen.

Anyway, later that evening and on the next day's ride, one of my knees did hurt quite a bit, and in a way I'd never felt before. The other one hurt a little too, but not much, and it didn't last into the next day.

I took a couple of days off (because it was before the time change I couldn't ride after work anyway), and it was fine when I next got on the bike.

I attributed the pain to the extremely forward position of being on the rivet, and not having trained up for that position at all. So I think if you spent time on the rivet and hadn't worked up to it, you might cause some knee pain, but if you worked into it you'd be fine.
 

·
No Crybabies
Joined
·
11,692 Posts
height?

bikeboy389 said:
A couple of months ago, I did some "on the rivet" riding on one of my Saturday rides--I was out with a pal who's training for a TT this summer, and when he got on the TT bars it was my only option apart from letting him drop me. Not. Going. To. Happen.

Anyway, later that evening and on the next day's ride, one of my knees did hurt quite a bit, and in a way I'd never felt before. The other one hurt a little too, but not much, and it didn't last into the next day.

I took a couple of days off (because it was before the time change I couldn't ride after work anyway), and it was fine when I next got on the bike.

I attributed the pain to the extremely forward position of being on the rivet, and not having trained up for that position at all. So I think if you spent time on the rivet and hadn't worked up to it, you might cause some knee pain, but if you worked into it you'd be fine.
If you move forward, but don't raise your seat, you are in effect lowering your seat. If you have a seat too low, that increases the stress on your knees, as they bend at a more acute angle. Bending at a more acute angle will be exacerbated if you are riding hard.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,996 Posts
* TT riders usually both raise their seat, and move it forward. I've heard it said that the "rule of thumb" is to start with 2cm each way.

* I'm not sure why, but I know the UCI mandates that your saddle must be at least 5cm behind the bottom bracket.

* They say the CSC-ites sometimes spend full, 5-to-7-hour mountain training rides on the TT bikes, just to get develop the muscles for them, etc. Ouch!
 

·
RoadBikeReview's Member
Joined
·
5,513 Posts
kai-ming said:
They sit at really forward position, therefore knees will be forward compare with the foot when pushing down. Will that hurt my knee ? I am kind of at middle age too. Or should I sit back and forget about TT.
My other worry would be, I don't know about other people, but when I'm on the rivet, almost all my weight tends to go to my perineal tissue (I think that's the word? The soft tissue between um yeah.). I find it uncomfortable because it feels like the saddle's perpendicular to me, but if I was racing a TT I might suck it up. My worry would be that pressure could lead to ED very quickly.
 

·
Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
Joined
·
9,419 Posts
estone2 said:
My other worry would be, I don't know about other people, but when I'm on the rivet, almost all my weight tends to go to my perineal tissue (I think that's the word? The soft tissue between um yeah.). I find it uncomfortable because it feels like the saddle's perpendicular to me, but if I was racing a TT I might suck it up. My worry would be that pressure could lead to ED very quickly.
Dude, you're 15. At your age, I'd have been pretty thankful for anything that might reduce the frequency of embarrassing boneage.

Also, in seriousness, I think when you're really working it in a TT you don't have all that much weight on your taint. At least I didn't.

And thanks everyone for pointing out the saddle height thing for my little TT experiment--I hadn't considered that, and I'm sure that's what made my knees hurt.
 

·
RoadBikeReview's Member
Joined
·
5,513 Posts
bikeboy389 said:
Dude, you're 15. At your age, I'd have been pretty thankful for anything that might reduce the frequency of embarrassing boneage.

Also, in seriousness, I think when you're really working it in a TT you don't have all that much weight on your taint. At least I didn't.

And thanks everyone for pointing out the saddle height thing for my little TT experiment--I hadn't considered that, and I'm sure that's what made my knees hurt.
I was talking about for you guys, ED wise. Me, I have doubts that I'll ever get laid, so it ain't an issue :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
324 Posts
Fixed said:
Actually, it's ok for your knees. The position moves your hips forward, but your knees don't know the difference. The knee angle is the same. Also, many people tend to spin when time trialing, anyway, which is better on the knees.

The hardest part about that position is the strain on your neck and how the pressure point on your crotch moves forward. I tried that extreme position on my Cervelo P3 for 100 miles, and my neck was killing me. Anyone could handle it for an hour, though, if they are somewhat used to it, especially when it can be substantially faster.
Couldn't agree more. Your entire body's rotated forward, so nothing's that different. It takes practice to hold your head up, though. I love to TT, so I do at least one ride a week on the TT bike.

Also, dedicated TT saddles are completely different from road saddles. Much more padding on the nose, downright comfortable in the 'anal probe' position.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top