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So I am contemplating getting better tires for my cx bike, obviously after I beat the hell out of my current tires I have on it. My rims are tubeless ready so they can take anything.

Is tubeless tires the right option?
 

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Tubeless tires can work exceptionally well in cross, or they can be a major disappointment. Not all rims that are tubeless ready are going to work well. Not all tires are a good fit with all rims.

Tubed tires basically limit you to using low 30s or higher psi, or else pinch flats are somewhat guaranteed with aggressive riding. A good tubeless combo will let you use perhaps 10 psi less than that, which will give you better traction and handling, and perhaps most importantly it gives you some element of suspension which is critical to going fast in bumpy sections.

Tubeless will in all likelihood never equal the performance of good tubulars. Good tubulars come with their own set of obstacles and limitations - price of tires (can easily be $140) and the joy of glue for starters.

The answer to your question all depends on what rims you have.
 

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Huge in Japan
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Maybe, maybe not. Do you ride under conditions where you are flat prone? Do you have a need to run psi lower than a tubed tire should be ran? Do you have a desire to run a psi lower than a tubed tire should be ran and are willing to work with the sealant? You and your riding conditions will dictate whether it is worth it. I have a CX bike and can't imagine for me it being justifiable but others that ride different conditions than I do may feel it absolutely beneficial.

You can always try it and go back to tubes if it isn't your thing.
 

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changingleaf
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Yes, tubeless makes perfect sense for cross! Unfortunately, if you don't use the right combination of tire and rim it may not work as well as it should. Tire and rim manufacturers have not settled on a reliable standard for a bomb proof system for cross.

"Tubeless ready" is very generic. It doesn't necessarily mean the rims are ready to go as is. You may have to add tubeless tape if they have spoke holes and standard rim strips. Even if you do add tape the rim may not have a good design for holding the tire bead in place. You can actually make any rim tubeless, but that doesn't mean it's going to resist burping it low pressure.

Also, not all tubeless and tubeless ready tires have the same bead diameter.

With the right setup, and with the right rims and tires you certainly can run lower than 30 psi without burping. Start with using a tubeless cross tire like a Vittoria TNT. These are pretty tight, a bit heavy, but they have a tight bead. Don't use a specialized 2bliss on a basic tubeless ready rim. The 2bliss tires are much looser than Tubeless tires. They do work well on American Classic and Stan's rims though because AC and Stan's has a large bead diameter.

There's so many combinations. Testing may be necessary.
 

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Tubeless works great for gravel rides using sealant. Unless you slash a sidewall somehow you pretty much never have to worry about flats
 

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Of course it does! It's awesome!

However, it's best to have rims designed for tubeless. For example in the MTB world i have one wheel that isn't designed with tubeless in mind... it's a pita to setup as it requires CO2 (sometimes many) or air compressor to seat the bead whereas my Stan's Arch EX Rims, all i need is my high volume floor pump. Tire installs on the Stan's wheels are quick and easy. There's probably other reasons as well, but that's just one.

It also helps to use good sealant. Stan's regular formula is annoying on new installs. Orange Seal seems to work a lot better.
 

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As said tubeless is great on CX in regards to better traction and also giving you some bump compliance and a better ride while on the course. As said though, not all "tubeless ready" wheels work that well with the tires.

Example, my Giant P-CXR1 cross wheels. They are nice (DT Swiss internals) and decent in weight 1755g, but the bead edge is on the small side so I cant run the lower pressures I want. I have to run 36psi or higher or else I will burp the tires.

My race wheels (Stan's Iron Cross) have a larger bead edge, which makes seating some tires a true pain in the ass but I can run 20psi and not burp the tire at all. This also allows me to get a more comfortable ride due to the lower pressure.

So there are pro's and con's in both regards.
 
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