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I have Light Bicycle wheels with Continental GP5000TL's and they are by a MILE the hardest to mount tires I've ever used. Usually I can get tires on besides the last few inches of bead and use a lever for that. This setup leaves me with 12+ inches of bead which means I'm having to stretch it REALLY far. The interface is so tight that I even need a lever to get the bead over the valve stem if it ends up on the wrong side. I rear a roadside flat I cannot fix as I've already broken a few levers swapping these tires.

Is there anything similar? I like everything about the GP5000TL--the weight, flat protection, speed, etc. but before this I only ever used GP4000's so I'm not sure what would be comparable.
 

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I've used the GP 5kTL's, Schwalbe Pro One's and several Hutchinsons, all with good luck on Boyd 44's. I'm afraid all you can do is try a different tire then re-sell or return it if it doesn't work out unless you get feedback with someone with identical wheels.
 

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I have Light Bicycle wheels with Continental GP5000TL's and they are by a MILE the hardest to mount tires I've ever used. Usually I can get tires on besides the last few inches of bead and use a lever for that. This setup leaves me with 12+ inches of bead which means I'm having to stretch it REALLY far. The interface is so tight that I even need a lever to get the bead over the valve stem if it ends up on the wrong side. I rear a roadside flat I cannot fix as I've already broken a few levers swapping these tires.

Is there anything similar? I like everything about the GP5000TL--the weight, flat protection, speed, etc. but before this I only ever used GP4000's so I'm not sure what would be comparable.
Pirelli Cinturato


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I have Light Bicycle wheels with Continental GP5000TL's and they are by a MILE the hardest to mount tires I've ever used.
Have you used other tires with these wheels? How do you know the problem is the tire and not the rim?

I have no problem mounting GP5000's and Schwalbe Pro Ones. When new I can almost get them on by hand. After they're used and stretched a bit I can get them on by hand.



I've already broken a few levers swapping these tires.
Use a tire bead jack.

 

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Have you used other tires with these wheels? How do you know the problem is the tire and not the rim?
Or the combination. Some tire-rim combos are just impossible to mount/dismount. Using a different tire is cheaper than using a different rim.
 
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Yea that's why I started the thread. Not looking to get different wheels.
I don't run tubeless, but I can tell you Vittoria tires aren't that difficult to mount. You may want to see if they have tubeless options.
 

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here's an idea.
if you have a regular clincher wheelset, then mount the gp5000 on them. Go put a couple rides on them. Hopefully this will stretch the gp5000 enough to allow easier mounting on the Light Bicycle wheels. Brand new tires are generally tough, and if you get a tight rim, then it's almost impossible to work it.

another option is to heat the tires in the oven for 5 minutes under LOWEST heat setting (no more than 200 F max!), and even then wrap the tires in aluminum foil so they are not exposed to direct heat. This worked great for me (when I was still experimenting with tubeless, but now i'm back to good ole regular clinchers :giggle:)

also, use warm soapy water (only use a little bit of soap). With 12" of bead left that's huge, I think you will need to heat them tires up and use warm soapy water.
 

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Have you used other tires with these wheels? How do you know the problem is the tire and not the rim?

I have no problem mounting GP5000's and Schwalbe Pro Ones. When new I can almost get them on by hand. After they're used and stretched a bit I can get them on by hand.



Use a tire bead jack.

i'm afraid the tire jack will not help the OP in this case because of the extreme tightness he's facing. 12" of bead left is a huge amount left to roll over. The tire jack did not help me in one difficult tire/rim combo, it was so tight that the tire jack simply slipped out of the tire at great enough force. The OP will most likely will heat up the tires to get them to stretch.
 

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I couldn't wait to try the GP5000TL on my Fulcrum/Campy 2-way fit rims. I've used the GP4000 tires in the past and really liked the ride quality on my older HED tubed wheel setups. As others have said here, it comes down to the rim/tire combination.

In the past I've always run Hutchinson on these Fulcrum 2-way fits, with no problems. I bought one GP5000TL (25mm) to make sure it fit my frame before buying a pair. Glad I did because I've never struggled so much fitting a tire onto a rim in my life, tried all the tricks of warming the tire in the sun, using soapy water, forcing the tire into the tubeless channel on opposite side, and still had about the same 12" bead mismatch the OP describes. I know not to use tire levers with tubeless, but that is what I ended up resorting to after developing some nice blisters on both thumbs. finally the bead flipped over. They inflated fine but when I let the air out to add sealant, the bead came unseated. This never happened to me before. I re-inflated with about 120psi to make bead sit, but when I let the air out again, the bead came unseated again - I chalk this up to overly tight fit. Anyway, I added the sealant and re-inflated and bead seated again.

A side note, I also had air leaking from the side walls (I had to submerge rim in tub of water to see where it was leaking and the entire side wall bubbled pin hole air leaks - yes tire marked TL, but I'm thinking it is really just tubeless ready). Had to really shake the tire horizontally to get sealant to cover sidewalls, added more sealant the next day and repeated, and finally it holds air like a proper tubeless.

Since the install it has been working great (about 3 months now), but I do not feel any significant difference in the performance of the GP5000 over the Hutchinson Fusions on the front wheel (probably because of running lower tire pressure 75psi on tubeless, they are both nice). I know for a fact that if I ever have to add a tube to this tire on a roadside repair, I will be stuck. Once this one wears out, I have already bought my replacement, and it is not GP5000.

So my recommendation, for Fulcrum/Campy C-17 rims, I use Hutchinson 25mm: Intensive 2 on rear (not as grippy but wears better, plus fits my frame well), and Hutchinson Fusion 5 Performance on front (better grip but wears quite fast). This way both front and rear wear out at the same time. I can install these by hand, a perfect tubeless combination.

Good luck finding the right fit for your wheels, once you do, tubeless is definitely the way to go.
 

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I'm very happy with both the Schwalbe One and Pro One. The former is a bit more robust of a tire, but both are prone to cuts. Typically I'll throw some Shoe Goo in the cuts after making sure there's no debris in them. I have a riding buddy who was on Contis forever, finally convinced him to try out the Schwalbes and now he's a convert. Good luck!
 

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I use Hutchinson 25mm: Intensive 2 on rear (not as grippy but wears better, plus fits my frame well), and Hutchinson Fusion 5 Performance on front (better grip but wears quite fast). This way both front and rear wear out at the same time.
Say what? How do you wear out a front tire? Tires wear out (lose rubber) due to power transfer and the only power transfer on the front wheel is due to braking. They get old, the crack, they craze, they get cut, but if you weigh one new and weigh it a year later it will not have lost any rubber.
 

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Say what? How do you wear out a front tire? Tires wear out (lose rubber) due to power transfer and the only power transfer on the front wheel is due to braking. They get old, the crack, they craze, they get cut, but if you weigh one new and weigh it a year later it will not have lost any rubber.
Not to be pedantic, but won't the tire lose a modicum of rubber to friction with the road?

Agree that a back tire will wear out much faster than a front, so that the "modicum" described above is basically an irrelevancy.
 

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Not to be pedantic, but won't the tire lose a modicum of rubber to friction with the road?

Agree that a back tire will wear out much faster than a front, so that the "modicum" described above is basically an irrelevancy.
Yes it will, but very slowly. I would say your rear tire will wear out at least 3 times as fast as your front. I will never know for sure first hand because when my rear tire wears out, I move my front tire to the rear and then put a new tire on the front so I always have my safest tire on the front.
 

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Yes it will, but very slowly. I would say your rear tire will wear out at least 3 times as fast as your front. I will never know for sure first hand because when my rear tire wears out, I move my front tire to the rear and then put a new tire on the front so I always have my safest tire on the front.
Exactly my experience (and practice).
 

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Not to be pedantic, but won't the tire lose a modicum of rubber to friction with the road?

Agree that a back tire will wear out much faster than a front, so that the "modicum" described above is basically an irrelevancy.
Not to be specific, but I weighed a new tire before mounting it on the front, rode it 6,000 miles, and weighed it again. Approximately 1 gm weight loss on a scale with 0.1 gm accuracy. In other words, essentially no weight loss. I suppose I could have kept riding until the rubber got so crusty it started crumbling off the tire, but other than that I would say that this amount of weight loss doesn't even qualify as a "modicum".
 

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Not to be specific, but I weighed a new tire before mounting it on the front, rode it 6,000 miles, and weighed it again. Approximately 1 gm weight loss on a scale with 0.1 gm accuracy. In other words, essentially no weight loss. I suppose I could have kept riding until the rubber got so crusty it started crumbling off the tire, but other than that I would say that this amount of weight loss doesn't even qualify as a "modicum".
But the question is how much mass does a rear tire lose from new to needing to be replaced?
 

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Not to be specific, but I weighed a new tire before mounting it on the front, rode it 6,000 miles, and weighed it again. Approximately 1 gm weight loss on a scale with 0.1 gm accuracy. In other words, essentially no weight loss. I suppose I could have kept riding until the rubber got so crusty it started crumbling off the tire, but other than that I would say that this amount of weight loss doesn't even qualify as a "modicum".
Half a modicum, then. :)
 

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But the question is how much mass does a rear tire lose from new to needing to be replaced?
Depends on the tire. Some tires have more sidewall protection and therefore less tread rubber so as to keep the weight down. Continentals put pretty much all of the rubber on the wear zone. But round numbers: 15-20% for a tire starting at 230 gm, so roughly 30 gm. Probably a wider, heavier tire would lose about the same percentage but more weight before being worn out.
 
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