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So Campy announced that a couple of their wheelsets will be tubeless compatible in 2009. Shimano already has it.

Has anyone heard if any other major manufacturers will be offering such products ie. Zipp? Reynolds? Mavic ?

Thanks
Power1369
 

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Specialized's Roval wheels will have tubeless compatible models, and Specialized will have a tubeless road tire, the turbo tubeless, which will be made by Hutchinson. What's funny is all the specs I've seen so far are identical to the Hutchinson Fusion2 Tubeless.

More about the wheel:

The Roval tubeless road wheel will have a Campagnolo-made rim (which recently released its own tubeless wheelset) and DT/Swiss hub bodies, internals and spokes. The front hub will have a carbon shell while the rear will feature a CNC-machined alloy body. Though considered a '10 product they will be available in early-to-mid '09.
http://thisjustin.bicycling.com/2008/07/specialized-09.html
 

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I'd imagine that the entire industry will start going tubeless in the next few years for road bikes. Then again, it may be just a hopeful wish. No more pinch flats would be a very good thing.
 

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is the inside rim profile on tubeless rims different from the regular clinchers? i have a set of Fulcrum Zeros and i was told that all i needed was the tubeless type valve and i would be set. is this not the case? let me know.
 

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veloci1 said:
is the inside rim profile on tubeless rims different from the regular clinchers? i have a set of Fulcrum Zeros and i was told that all i needed was the tubeless type valve and i would be set. is this not the case? let me know.

You have to add a sealant into the tire for a complete air tight seal. The only benefit i see is no more pinch flats but i never had any anyways (knock on wood).
The Hutchy tubeless tires add no weight savings to a norm 190gram tire plus 70g inner.
And like automotive alloy wheels, over time you will have to sand down the build up sealant and rubber contact that adheres to the inside clincher wheel. (predicated on how many times you take wheels off and remount etc)
im not completely sold on this idea at all
 

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breakaway said:
You have to add a sealant into the tire for a complete air tight seal. The only benefit i see is no more pinch flats but i never had any anyways (knock on wood).
The Hutchy tubeless tires add no weight savings to a norm 190gram tire plus 70g inner.
And like automotive alloy wheels, over time you will have to sand down the build up sealant and rubber contact that adheres to the inside clincher wheel. (predicated on how many times you take wheels off and remount etc)
im not completely sold on this idea at all
Stan's has been used in MTB circles for many years now despite similar negatives being cited at its introduction.

On MTB rims a rag soaked in warm water is enough to remove any buildup of dry sealant at the bead....there is no need to sand it off.

Tubeless tyres will get lighter, better rims will be developed and before long innertubes will be something you tell your grandchildren about. :D
 

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And like automotive alloy wheels, over time you will have to sand down the build up sealant and rubber contact that adheres to the inside clincher wheel. (predicated on how many times you take wheels off and remount etc)
im not completely sold on this idea at all
You do not need to use sealant with the Shimano/Hutchinson set-up. I've got about 4000 miles on mine and have never had a problem. Tires lose air at about the rate of a normal tube/tire set-up.

True, no weight benefit (at this point in time), but I wouldn't think of running my tube/tire set-ups at 85-90 psi, which is the pressure I run my tubeless at. Very smooth ride, with no sacrifice to rolling resistance.
 

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Dr_John said:
You do not need to use sealant with the Shimano/Hutchinson set-up. I've got about 4000 miles on mine and have never had a problem. Tires lose air at about the rate of a normal tube/tire set-up.

True, no weight benefit (at this point in time), but I wouldn't think of running my tube/tire set-ups at 85-90 psi, which is the pressure I run my tubeless at. Very smooth ride, with no sacrifice to rolling resistance.

yeah ive received mixed answers on the sealant from 3 shops ive visited when inquiring about them. One has said the moistening of the tire is not enough. But the introduction into road use is a great idea since they have been using this in mountain bike wheels for a while now too.
And yes it would be ideal when the tyres themselves can get in the low 200gram range.
Also thou its said you can lower your psi on these tyres for a smoother ride i wouldnt chance it (cause i ride 20's) for the sake of denting the rim. That would suck
 

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I suspect the mixed response from shops are from people that haven't even used the Shimano/Hutchinson set-up. Again, I've used them for 4,000 miles and several rounds of tires without a problem.

As far as I know the Hutchinson tires are only available in 700 X 23, and I'm not concerned at all about denting a rim at 90 versus 105 psi.
 

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Stan's released a Road Tubeless conversion kit, which should work on most any 700c road rim. So far as I know, there is only Shimano producing Road Tubeless wheelsets, with Specialized soon to follow with a Campagnolo...I can only assume Campagnolo will have their own too.

I am soon to invest in the Stan's kit and experiment with the Hutchinson tires until more options surface...I am all over the Specialized Turbo Road Tubeless tire!
 

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I agree wholeheatedly w/Dr John. I have about 12000 miles on my Shimano 7850sl wheelset using Hutchinson tires. Started w/Fusion 2's and now running the Atom's. Tire sealant not absolutely needed. I've only mounted 1 tire that lost air at a higher rate than a tubed clincher. I typically run 80-85psi and they ride smooth and roll great!
 
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