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Automotive tire manufacturers recommend replacement of rubber after 5 years, regardless of miles. The rubber is not as supple as it once was, and the tire itself can become out of round and develop flat spots. I guess if you wanted an opinion, I would parallel how automotive tires are treated. But then again, it is really up to you. Never assume anything when it comes to your safety, and that of others when riding in a group.

Best Regards,

Jim Parman
 

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Nrvus said:
I have a Colnago Super that probably still has the original tubulars mounted. If they still hold air which they do, should i assume that they are still good to ride on?
If they've been kept out of direct sunlight and not exposed to extreme heat or cold temperatures they're probably fine to ride. Assuming a visual check for dried or rotton sidewalls or large cuts. Main thing is to scrape as much of the old dried glue off the tire and the rim. Clean both well with Naptha, and properly re-glue the tires to the rims.

I'm running a couple of pairs of CX's that came on used bikes that are at least fifteen years old , but were well cared for. They ride great and and present no saftey issue I can see.

Again, the biggest issue with a tubular is "rolling" the tire due to careless instalation, not a blowout.
 

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Maybeck said:
If they've been kept out of direct sunlight and not exposed to extreme heat or cold temperatures they're probably fine to ride. Assuming a visual check for dried or rotton sidewalls or large cuts. Main thing is to scrape as much of the old dried glue off the tire and the rim. Clean both well with Naptha, and properly re-glue the tires to the rims.
... and I'd avoid dragging knee around the corners until you've got a few rides under your belt on these tires. I've been told the glue can dry out over a few years (but I've ridden the same tubular tire for multiple years without ever re-gluing, and I never had a problem).

Have fun!

- FBB
 

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I agree with bagatelle. Start off slowly with the old rubber. Then again, given the penchant for aging tubulars in cellars, maybe those tires are just now entering their prime.
 

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Forbes and Mapei have it right. The tire might be just fine. Ride gently on it, gaining confidence in it. If it has a problem, you'll find out.

Have you done a pressure test? just pump it up to a reasonable pressure (say 90 psi) and see if it holds air. Also see if it disintegrates. Also see if the valve has any problems.

Try to mount it on a rim. If the rim tape or casing becomes (more) degraded, you have a problem to evaluate.

Basically just try using it, but be careful and safe to start.

Ken
 

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Reglue them. The old glue is shot.
 
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