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I have Reynolds Cirro SVs with Conti Sprinters and my front wheel with tire and skewer weigh 800gr. I love the ride and hate carrying a full spare. A bike tech told me he carries a very light/foldable spare. I can't find such a thing..... what is the best option?
 

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Carry a spare

gtrguy said:
I have Reynolds Cirro SVs with Conti Sprinters and my front wheel with tire and skewer weigh 800gr. I love the ride and hate carrying a full spare. A bike tech told me he carries a very light/foldable spare. I can't find such a thing..... what is the best option?
The only ways you can save weight with tubular spares is to 1) carry something stupid light, like a track or time trial tire 2) mooch off your riding buddies, 3) have a follow car with spare wheels/tires, or 4) have someone you can call any time you're out on a ride. The problems with these approaches are 1) you'll likely flat soon after you change the tire, 2) your buddies may start mooching off of/ditching you, 3) a bit pretentious and difficult logistics, 4) you have to deal with the added weight of a cell phone.

I can't imaging what your bike tech was talking about - it sounds like clincher terminology, as all tubulars are "foldable". Carry a spare tire and suck it up :)
 

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Kerry Irons said:
The only ways you can save weight with tubular spares is to 1) carry something stupid light, like a track or time trial tire 2) mooch off your riding buddies, 3) have a follow car with spare wheels/tires, or 4) have someone you can call any time you're out on a ride. The problems with these approaches are 1) you'll likely flat soon after you change the tire, 2) your buddies may start mooching off of/ditching you, 3) a bit pretentious and difficult logistics, 4) you have to deal with the added weight of a cell phone.

I can't imaging what your bike tech was talking about - it sounds like clincher terminology, as all tubulars are "foldable". Carry a spare tire and suck it up :)
this day and age, carry two. Oh, and some Tufo goop just in case!

M
 

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What does this have to do with anything?
"I have Reynolds Cirro SVs with Conti Sprinters and my front wheel with tire and skewer weigh 800gr."
.
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If you ride tubies for training, then yes, you have to carry a spare. I'm not sure why you are worried about an extra 300 grams. If you carry a spare, it must be carried and folded properly under your seat. I could tell you the "proper" method to carry and fold a tubie, but then I would have to kill you.
Sorry, I don't want the death of a novice tubie rider on my hands.
I'll give you a hint....It involves a "special" Binda toe strap.
 

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Yeah, what they said.

gtrguy said:
I have Reynolds Cirro SVs with Conti Sprinters and my front wheel with tire and skewer weigh 800gr. I love the ride and hate carrying a full spare. A bike tech told me he carries a very light/foldable spare. I can't find such a thing..... what is the best option?
Carry a spare. Sure, you can patch a tire by the side of the road, and folks do, but it's sort of time consuming and labor intensive. I have a little patch kit for emergencies, but I have a spare as well, and I guarantee that I'll go to the spare first.

As others said: they're all foldable. Now, it's certainly possible to shave 50 or 75 grams off the weight of that sprinter without going to a track tire (which you don't want to do for road use), but you'll spend a few bucks to do it and I find it highly dubious that, while riding, you'll notice the difference between, say, having a conti sprinter folded under your saddle and a veloflex record folded up under your saddle. But sure: there are (somewhat) lighter weight road tires that are still suitable for general use and, for any given model tire, a 19 will likely weigh a few grams less than a 22. In a race or on a special hill climb you can rely on support, but for riding generally you need to choose between (a) carrying a spare tire folded under your saddle, and the couple hundred grams or whatever that entails, (b) sitting by the side of the road and sewing, or (c) calling/praying/waiting for help to come along.
 
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