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tubulars and clinchers,,,, What's the difence...
I get the impression that one is the tube inside a seprate tire, like we've had for years, and the ohter is tire and tube all in package.
I can see "tubeulars" as the old tube inseted into a tire, but I could also see calling the combo a clincher, 'cause the bead clinches it'self to the rim...
I can see the tire and tube all in one pice being a tubelar as well... BTW,,, this is the one that is glued to the rim?
 

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Tubulars, sew-ups and clinchers

Visitor302 said:
tubulars and clinchers,,,, What's the difence...
I get the impression that one is the tube inside a seprate tire, like we've had for years, and the ohter is tire and tube all in package.
I can see "tubeulars" as the old tube inseted into a tire, but I could also see calling the combo a clincher, 'cause the bead clinches it'self to the rim...
I can see the tire and tube all in one pice being a tubelar as well... BTW,,, this is the one that is glued to the rim?
Tubular tires are just that - the tire cross-section is a completely unclosed tube. These tires are also know as sew-ups, because the edges of the casings are - wait for it - sewn together (to form a continuous tube). As you have surmised, the inner tube has to be inserted into the tire before they are sewn up.

With few exceptions (like the TUFO tubeless tubulars), tubular tires have a standard inner tube inside. To repair a puncture in a tubular tire, you have to unsew the casing near the puncture, pull the punctured section of the inner tube out, patch it, and then re-insert the section of inner tube and sew the tire back up. The tedium and labor of repairing tubulars is just one of the reasons that they are the less commonly used than clinchers.

Tubular tires are held onto the rim via two mechanisms. Tubular rims have a smooth bed, and the tire is held onto the rim bed with a thick layer of tacky adhesive. The second mechanism that holds a tubular on is that due to the angles of the casing plys, a tubular tire tends to circumferentially contract when inflated under high pressure, and this contraction helps to "cinch" the tire onto the rim.

As you also guessed clincher tires are held onto the rim by a "clinch" between tire and rim. The tire has bubous "beads" at the edges of the tire casing, which fit under "lips" on the inner edges of the rim sidewalls. When inflated, the internal pneumatic pressure presses the beads outward, causing them to interlock with the raised lips on the rim sidwalls. Because a clincher tire is "open" inside the rim, inner tubes can be installed and removed easily.
 

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Clinchers, Tubies, and Latex, oh my !
 
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