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Hi all,

I am considering buying a second rear wheel for use soley on a trainer, saving the better wheel/tyre for road use. Is it possible to use a different size gearing for the cassette on the spare than I have on the current wheel or does that require tweaking of the shifters each time I switch wheel to get the rear mech to work with the new cassette.
 

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No need to tweak

It's very unlikely that you would need to tweak the shifting when swapping wheels. Of course, that begs the question of why you think you need a different set of wheels for your trainer. Trainers are not exactly hard on wheels, so changing the tire is all that is really necessary.
 

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Kerry - you normally give great advice, and you are correct that no tweaking should be required for the most commonly used cassettes. But why would you want to have to change the tire everytime you switch between road and the trainer? What a hassle! Far easier to get a cheap rear wheel for the trainer and use up old tires no longer suitable for the road.
 

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I've got a cheap, used wheel that's been round the block too many times for the trainer. It gets the tires that aren't fit for the road any more.

Maybe I'm a wimpy, but changing and reinflating a tire takes me 3-5 minutes, and gets my hands filthy. Changing a wheels, like 15 seconds.
 

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Not every time

BugMan said:
But why would you want to have to change the tire everytime you switch between road and the trainer? What a hassle!
Where I come from, there's roller/trainer season and riding season. You put on your trainer tire when you move indoors, and if you get a nice day and can ride outside, then you can actually ride on that trainer tire. But for most of the time, you're riding indoors. I was not suggesting that you swap tires every time you go outside, but that you put on a tougher tire in the winter. It seems to me to be a lot more cost effective than buying a wheel. YMMV
 

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Kerry Irons said:
Where I come from, there's roller/trainer season and riding season. You put on your trainer tire when you move indoors, and if you get a nice day and can ride outside, then you can actually ride on that trainer tire. But for most of the time, you're riding indoors. I was not suggesting that you swap tires every time you go outside, but that you put on a tougher tire in the winter. It seems to me to be a lot more cost effective than buying a wheel. YMMV
Yep, I forgot you're up in the north country where that does make sense. Here winters are rather open - we generally ride outside but can get chased indoors on any given day. I avoid the trainer like a plague (at least for indoor riding - warmup before a race is a different story), but when I do 'resort' it's nice to have a knockup wheel to keep from burning my good rubber.
 

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Argentius said:
I've got a cheap, used wheel that's been round the block too many times for the trainer. It gets the tires that aren't fit for the road any more.

Maybe I'm a wimpy, but changing and reinflating a tire takes me 3-5 minutes, and gets my hands filthy. Changing a wheels, like 15 seconds.

I agree... In fact, I found a set of el-cheepo wheels for my MTB that I mountd a set of street treads to... Now when I want to ride in the dirt, I do a couple quick realeses, and put the origonal wheel/tire combo on, then when the wife want to ride rails to trials, I reverse the process... (But when I feel the need for speed, I hop on the roadie)
 
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