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I have all the parts to build up a new road bike. An LBS quoted me $250. Does that sound right?

Everything needs to be done: pressing the headset, cutting the steerer, cutting cables, BB install, etc.
 

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oldskoolboarder said:
I have all the parts to build up a new road bike. An LBS quoted me $250. Does that sound right?

Everything needs to be done: pressing the headset, cutting the steerer, cutting cables, BB install, etc.
I would have expected about 1/2 that price Unless it includes a fitting.
 

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oldskoolboarder said:
I have all the parts to build up a new road bike. An LBS quoted me $250. Does that sound right?

Everything needs to be done: pressing the headset, cutting the steerer, cutting cables, BB install, etc.
Does it include a wheel build or two?

It not, $100-150 sounds more reasonable from a pro shop.

$250 for me is more like the cost of a downhill bike assembly, complete with wheel builds and brake bleeding. Road bikes are not that complicated!
 

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to high

Our shop charges 125 for a complete build up, that included putting everything in headset bb everything, 250 sounds kinda high, ask them to break it down. We fiqure on about 3 hours to build a bike from the ground up, shop rate is $50 hour for gen maintence, so we actually give a deal on a complete build up.
 

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Shop around, if you need some recommendations, I'm sure we can help you find one in the bay area that is more reasonable. I know of one in particluar... the owner can be found over on the mtbr side...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
KonaMan said:
Shop around, if you need some recommendations, I'm sure we can help you find one in the bay area that is more reasonable. I know of one in particluar... the owner can be found over on the mtbr side...
I'm open to recs in the SF Bay Area. The more I think about it, I'll shop around a little bit. Was hoping to get it built so I can ride it over the 3 day weekend. Or at least to watch the Tour de California on the route.
 

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oldskoolboarder said:
I'm open to recs in the SF Bay Area. The more I think about it, I'll shop around a little bit. Was hoping to get it built so I can ride it over the 3 day weekend. Or at least to watch the Tour de California on the route.
Ask about the warranty on the work. A new bike always has cable stretch and things like that, part of what you're paying for is the option to return after a few weeks riding for a quick adjustment.

Were the parts bought off ebay or something? might explain the high labour price.
 

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Let's talk about etiquette here. Most bike shops operate on thin margins. Good shops service what they sell. Good shops also try to cultivate good customer relationships. The typical guy who comes into a shop and has all the parts and frame and wants someone to build it up for him tells a shop owner that this is a person who would not buy parts from a shop but would rather buy at deep discounts. So this shop owner decides to quote you a high price. Either you go away and find someone else, or you say yes and the shop owner made a decent profit off a one-time gig.

Now, as far as customer service is concerned, some shops are run by folks that understand things as they are nowadays. They accept someone coming in with frame and parts that does not have the tools or the experience to build a bike up themselves. This shop may then charge their typical build rate and accept that possibly if they do a good job for you that you might come back to that shop to buy something else sometime.

How would you think a car dealer would deal with you if you brought your car and the parts needed to fix it to them and asked them to do the job for you? Essentially you are doing the same thing with your bike frame and parts.
 

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Insight Driver said:
Let's talk about etiquette here. Most bike shops operate on thin margins. Good shops service what they sell. Good shops also try to cultivate good customer relationships. The typical guy who comes into a shop and has all the parts and frame and wants someone to build it up for him tells a shop owner that this is a person who would not buy parts from a shop but would rather buy at deep discounts. So this shop owner decides to quote you a high price. Either you go away and find someone else, or you say yes and the shop owner made a decent profit off a one-time gig.

Now, as far as customer service is concerned, some shops are run by folks that understand things as they are nowadays. They accept someone coming in with frame and parts that does not have the tools or the experience to build a bike up themselves. This shop may then charge their typical build rate and accept that possibly if they do a good job for you that you might come back to that shop to buy something else sometime.

How would you think a car dealer would deal with you if you brought your car and the parts needed to fix it to them and asked them to do the job for you? Essentially you are doing the same thing with your bike frame and parts.
Very good point.

In my experience, customer assembled build kits almost always end up with compatibility errors, making the job more lengthy as the mechanic has to play phone tag with a wish-washy customer who can't stand paying retail and who wonders why the shop won't help him out by exchanging his part that doesn't fit with what he really should have bought........It gets pretty lame.

But really, that aside, it's a road bike. Charging $250 to build it is still on the high side for a build w/o wheel lacing. That's 5 hours at $50 an hour. The mechanic isn't worth $50 an hour if it takes him that long to build a bike!
 

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5 of my 7 bikes were built by one of two local shops with parts that I assembled elsewhere at the lowest prices I could find via ebay, etc. Despite this, I'm always welcomed in each store and my business is appreciated. I regularly purchase a variety of items from these shops and have all my ongoing service done by one or the other. I am always polite, considerate of their time and appreciative of what they do for me. In each case, the shops are well run with competent and experienced mechanics. I have paid between $50 and $80 for a complete build from the ground up and I'm amazed they can/will do it for this price. I'm sure my experience is fairly unique but it has been a very good one in all regards.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Good to go

Found an LBS w/ in 2 min of my house that I've used before. Much more reasonable price and does include follow up tune ups.
 

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oldskoolboarder said:
I have all the parts to build up a new road bike. An LBS quoted me $250. Does that sound right?

Everything needs to be done: pressing the headset, cutting the steerer, cutting cables, BB install, etc.
For 250$ you could buy all the tools necessary to do it yourself.

However, 5 years ago I had a LBS swap all my parts onto a new frame and they charged me 80$. However, that is the last time I reall ever had a LBS do anything for me. I bought some do it yourself manuals and tools and am very happy now.
 

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mattv2099 said:
For 250$ you could buy all the tools necessary to do it yourself.

However, 5 years ago I had a LBS swap all my parts onto a new frame and they charged me 80$. However, that is the last time I reall ever had a LBS do anything for me. I bought some do it yourself manuals and tools and am very happy now.
Where did you get a bottom bracket facing tool, plus a headset tool and all the other tools you need for a bike for that price?
 

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Insight Driver said:
Where did you get a bottom bracket facing tool, plus a headset tool and all the other tools you need for a bike for that price?
BB facing tool - Orbital hand sander $39
or
Campy face and chase setup - $75 at an auction of a shop that went under

H/S tool - Park tool consumer headset press HHP3 $50

Cable cutters - $20ish

3 way allen wrench - $10ish

small phillips screwdriver - $3

Defend it all you want, but $250 is WAAAY too high for a build. I charge $100 and take care of any problems that arise after the bike has been ridden for a while.
 

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I think shops in San Francisco are more expensive than other places around the country. Their monthly rent is a lot more too. $250 does seem a bit much though. I took a wheel in about 2 years ago to have a freewheel removed (yes freewheel). 2 minutes max to remove it and it cost me $10. I would have rather bought the tool but they didn't have one (old school suntour 2 prong). I know shops go thru tools but sheesh...had it been $5 or even $7 they'd have had a future customer, instead they lost my future business. Based on the bikes this shop had for sale, I think the average buyer had an income of 100K or more.
 

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Insight Driver said:
Where did you get a bottom bracket facing tool, plus a headset tool and all the other tools you need for a bike for that price?
Facing tool?

It's the 21st century, if your high end frame needs a BB facing before building, I'd re-think the purchase.
 

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Insight Driver said:
Where did you get a bottom bracket facing tool, plus a headset tool and all the other tools you need for a bike for that price?
At the time all I had were titanium frames which needed no facing. I made my own headset tool out of threaded rod and nuts + washers. The headset press works well on my ti frames with CK headsets but I'd never do it with aluminum...
 

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bg. said:
Facing tool?

It's the 21st century, if your high end frame needs a BB facing before building, I'd re-think the purchase.
I just built a new Bianchi Freccia Celeste and the BB needed to be chased.A LOT of shavings came out when doing so.

To the OP,have you considered trying it yourself?Might sound intimidating.However,I have built my last two bikes and all you really need are some allen keys,cable cutters and a BB tool.Park Tools website explains a lot of the basic stuff you need to know.I just finished a build 3 days ago.The only thing I wasn't comfortable with was cutting the steerer tube so I gave the mech at my LBS(I'm friends with him)$20 to just give the bike a quick look over for any mistakes and to cut the steerer.Just an Idea.
 
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