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Someone was telling me today that the UCI decided to allow disc brakes in cyclocross racing. Is this true?
 

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elmar
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Scheibenbremsen nächstes Jahr erlaubt ? UCI to legalize disc brakes? Two European-based industry insiders said that the UCI has already approved disc-brakes for next year and is just studying equipment safety to ensure forks and frames can handle the extra stress from the brakes. However, the UCI’s Christel Pichonnaz denies that this decision has been made, but did tell Cyclocross Magazine that they are currently considering reversing the modern brake ban. If it happens, will we see a disc-brake equipped racer cruise to a muddy win in Bend next year? We doubt it. But at least one major ‘cross bike manufacturer is bringing back disc-brake tabs.

its from velonews in december
 

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I am sure some people will ride discs. For those that do a bunch of fire trail and commuting that is a good idea. Not too sure on a top level that the added weight and good brakeing will take over. Usually not brakeing is where you can make up ground in cross races. I have mini Vs on one bike and they work much better than cantis on long downhills or the steep stuff, but cantis seem to work for my racing needs. Guess we need to stock up on old style canti only forks for the long haul, cause I am not changing my bikes.
 

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Formosan Cyclocross
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Damn! I worked so hard to be a poseur, non-real deal rider in the gray area of being allowed on to this board... and now they change the rules. I'll have to put fox tails on my bar enda and maybe a caution flag. Geeze!
 

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elmar
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PeanutButterBreath said:
The "ease" and "advantage" mostly apply to manufacturers and sellers of bicycle equipment.

i dont think so.
mechanical disbrakes actaully work well and are much !!! cheaper ,than a lot of euro mag or euro-x ,or ,or .

hubs ,frames and forks can be the same price.
if they are built as disc-only you dont lose weight on them .
muddy races can be done with one bike.
if a vwheel is bend ,you can finish without having a sparebike.
you dont use your rims a a disc for braking , so they last longerv

there is a modern view,that can help to develop the sport
its saver when wet ,a lot of biker use their bike as a commuter.
 

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Number 2 on the course.
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Mechanicals are much heavier than cantis so even if you could build a disc fork with a weight on par with something like the 430g Easton, it would have to be significantly lighter or you would still gain weight. Even if you could build a 200g disc fork, someone would take the same miracle technology and build a canti version which could be used with 200+g per wheel lighter rim brakes. Discs will never compete with rim brakes on weight unless it becomes possible to use some exclusive property of disc braking to make frames, forks and rims significantly lighter than those compatible with rim braking.

Of course, you could argue that the UCI weight restrictions create a niche for discs by preventing rim brakes from competing on weight to their true potential. But we could reasonably assume that if the UCI approves disc brakes it will be open to lowering the weight min., since disc bikes would have to be under built relative to rim brake bikes to compete on weight. If this happens, discs are stuck once again with a weight penalty.

If not, there is still the matter of price. BB7s are about $40 cheaper than Paul Neo Retros. However, I can combine by Neo Retro with a sub $100 fork that weighs 650g for a $200 brake & fork combo that weighs under 800g. The BB7 weighs 350g. I don't know of a $140, 450g disc fork and I doubt one will ever be available at that price. True, there are lighter hydraulic brakes that could be adapted if the UCI ban lifts, but they are still significantly heavier than light cantis.

As far as performance, I submit that rim brakes are fine for racing, with the possible exception of that one turn in that one race where video shows the entire field stacking up in to a sharp corner at the bottom of a muddy hill. There were no disc brake bikes shown for comparison, so we can't know whether they would have fared better or simply overpowered the tire's grip and met the same fate.

And disc brakes won't keep mud from gumming up your drivetrain, so their advantage as far as required bike changes is moot.

So really, other than being interesting from a techno geek standpoint, this modern view of yours does nothing to develop the sport other than drive up cost. Which is fine if you sell bicycle equipment and/or have extra money laying around.
 

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Pusher of Pedals
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A lighter hearted view...

CXers could race naked and shave their heads, eyebrows and nethers. The weight "penalty" gained by using discs would be canceled out by the lack of clothing and hair. :blush2:

I happen to own a Cannondale CX7 with BB7s. Bought it to cruise the ditch banks and some of the fire roads around here. If they lift the ban, I may actually race with the thing... For fun. Good thing about being a Clydesdale of a rider - I don't worry about the weight of my components, I just have FUN. :thumbsup:
 

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Hmm. Rebuild 4 sets of wheels to runs disc? Nope! For my needs my Neo Retros work great! This rule change may happen eventually since I think I read that Adam Myerson was the only one to vote against a change.

Jeff
 

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I think the main reason to not use discs is that they look like poop on a cross bike. That and I seem to be able to stop pretty well with my cantis
 

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PeanutButterBreath said:
Mechanicals are much heavier than cantis so even if you could build a disc fork with a weight on par with something like the 430g Easton, it would have to be significantly lighter or you would still gain weight. Even if you could build a 200g disc fork, someone would take the same miracle technology and build a canti version which could be used with 200+g per wheel lighter rim brakes. Discs will never compete with rim brakes on weight unless it becomes possible to use some exclusive property of disc braking to make frames, forks and rims significantly lighter than those compatible with rim braking.

Of course, you could argue that the UCI weight restrictions create a niche for discs by preventing rim brakes from competing on weight to their true potential. But we could reasonably assume that if the UCI approves disc brakes it will be open to lowering the weight min., since disc bikes would have to be under built relative to rim brake bikes to compete on weight. If this happens, discs are stuck once again with a weight penalty.

If not, there is still the matter of price. BB7s are about $40 cheaper than Paul Neo Retros. However, I can combine by Neo Retro with a sub $100 fork that weighs 650g for a $200 brake & fork combo that weighs under 800g. The BB7 weighs 350g. I don't know of a $140, 450g disc fork and I doubt one will ever be available at that price. True, there are lighter hydraulic brakes that could be adapted if the UCI ban lifts, but they are still significantly heavier than light cantis.

As far as performance, I submit that rim brakes are fine for racing, with the possible exception of that one turn in that one race where video shows the entire field stacking up in to a sharp corner at the bottom of a muddy hill. There were no disc brake bikes shown for comparison, so we can't know whether they would have fared better or simply overpowered the tire's grip and met the same fate.

And disc brakes won't keep mud from gumming up your drivetrain, so their advantage as far as required bike changes is moot.

So really, other than being interesting from a techno geek standpoint, this modern view of yours does nothing to develop the sport other than drive up cost. Which is fine if you sell bicycle equipment and/or have extra money laying around.
This is the same logic that was used against disk brakes for XC racing. everyone uses disks now. It took time but they figured out a way to get the weight almost there and performance sold peoole. honestly I thought Vbrakes were good enough. I guess I was in the minority.
I am not sure I would go and do a bike swap to get a disk cross bike, but, in time, if they get the weight closer I just might...
 

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off topic (but back to disc wheels) - Swiss rider Beat Breau once rode a season (including the Worlds I think) on a disc back-wheel. Proper disc, not just a cover. I think his theory was to do with mud collecting although it couldn't have been too comfy.
 
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