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What do you guys consider to be the ultimate touring grouppo?

The Fiance has given me permission to have a custom made Curtlo touring frame built. As such, I will need to build up the frame. I am looking for quality parts that will stand the test of time. What will you buy?
 

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Wwbgd

Krafcik said:
What do you guys consider to be the ultimate touring grouppo?

The Fiance has given me permission to have a custom made Curtlo touring frame built. As such, I will need to build up the frame. I am looking for quality parts that will stand the test of time. What will you buy?
What Would Bruce Gordon Do

Check out the builds on his bikes. Quality and stand the test of time are his watch words, to the point that he's using 10 year technology on parts of his bikes.

Scot
 

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XTR RD
11-32 cassette
XT FD
Race Face 46-34-24 crankset

If the frame has fittings for disks:
Ultegra STI shifters
Avid mechanical road disk brakes (no travel agents required)

If the frame wil not have fittings for disks:
Dura-Ace bar end shifters
Diacompe 287V brake levers
Avid Single digit seven V brakes

Most importantly wheels:
36 hole Ultegra hubs
Dyad Velocity rims
14 guage stainless spokes with brass nipples
Schwalbe Marathon XR tires
 

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If it is good enough for Bruce Gordon it ought to be good enough for anyone.

Krafcik said:
What do you guys consider to be the ultimate touring grouppo?

The Fiance has given me permission to have a custom made Curtlo touring frame built. As such, I will need to build up the frame. I am looking for quality parts that will stand the test of time. What will you buy?
http://www.bgcycles.com/
 

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I can't brag about my huge touring experience but my ride is not holding me back.

Dura-Ace brifters with XTR changer and cassette. I recently added a compact crank to the mix. My low gear is a 34x34. The 9-speed MTB and road stuff is all interchangeable. It works flawlessly.

My issue has been brakes. I hate cantis. I've got some Paul brakes on the way. Hopefully, these will resolve my braking woes. If starting from scratch, I'd be looking into disk brakes.
 

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Phil hubs

I have Mavic rims laced to Phil hubs and they are sweet and they will last forever plus they are pretty.in the sunlight and I actually like to look down and watch the light reflect off of them at times. Sugino crank and Silver barend shifters from Rivensdell, Cane creek levers, Nitto stem and a Brooks saddle. The rest could be many variuos good parts. What Rivendell uses for parts are excellent also.
 

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Assuming that you use new, currently available parts, I favor Phil rear hub (135 mm OLD) and bottom bracket, Schmidt SON dynamo hub with E6 or Lumotec headlight, Sugino XD600 crank (comes standard 46-36-26T but I'd change the granny to a 24T), Nitto post (Crystal Fellow or Jaguar), Nitto Pearl stem, Nitto bars (your choice of model), Brooks B17 saddle, Shimano R400 brake levers, Shimano 9-speed bar-end shifters, Stronglight A9 headset, Shimano XT rear derailleur, Shimano LX front derailleur (sized for 46T chainring), Velocity Dyad or Sun CR18 (polished) rims (36H), 14/15 spokes, brass nipples, Velox rim tape, Panaracer Pasela Tourguard tires, Specialized Airlock tubes, Shimano R550 canti brakes, SKS fenders (or Berthoud stainless), Tubus Cargo and Tara racks, Arkel or Carradice panniers (depending on whether you prefer many small compartments or one large compartment), Carradice Camper Longflap saddlebag, and Shimano skewers. What have I missed?

The XTR rear derailleur doesn't really give you anything over XT except weight savings. Plus, it's titanium mounting bolt is hard to find and expensive to replace if it breaks. Most front derailleurs perform the same. The Deore LX is available in a size that works well with most touring-size chainrings.
 

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I am curious why most touring setups feature bar end shifters as opposed to STI. Wouldn't the same benefits of not having to move your hands to shift apply to the touring world? I realize bar ends shift flawlessly but am interested in the reasoning behind the touring world using bar ends instead of STI
 

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bigrider said:
I am curious why most touring setups feature bar end shifters as opposed to STI. Wouldn't the same benefits of not having to move your hands to shift apply to the touring world? I realize bar ends shift flawlessly but am interested in the reasoning behind the touring world using bar ends instead of STI
Reliability. If all else fails, reset them to friction.

Brake compatability. Other than discs, there still is nothing that uses the cable pull of a brifter and stops.

TF
 

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bigrider said:
I am curious why most touring setups feature bar end shifters as opposed to STI. Wouldn't the same benefits of not having to move your hands to shift apply to the touring world? I realize bar ends shift flawlessly but am interested in the reasoning behind the touring world using bar ends instead of STI
There are a couple of reasons. First, bar-end shifters are simpler and, thus, more durable. If they were to stop indexing, they can still operate in the friction mode. On tour, simple and durable are best. Second, for loaded touring you typically use smaller chainrings than on most road bikes. This means that you need to use a MTB front derailleur. Unfortunately, these are not compatible with Shimano's STI road shifters. Since bar-end shifters use friction, not indexing, for the front derailleur, there is no issue.
 

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Shimano cassettes

are interchangeable - e.g. road and mountain, as has been reported. You can use a road cassette with the recommended 46 - 34 - 24 crank and still get a very wide range of gears (even an 11 - 23 gives a very low gear) and you can change for a mountain cassette if the trip demands (24/34 will carry heavy loads up steep slopes.)

It's important to use the mountain (XT or XTR) derailleur because a road derailleur does not have clearance for the larger cogs (>27t as reported by Shimano, >30t as reported by others). Regardless, the XTR shifts very well with road or mountain cassettes.

FWIW Sugino makes a similar crank and you can find some very nice stuff at peterwhitecycles.com.

For lighting and fender ideas, visit Peter White too. The Schmidt dynohub is reported to be nearly bullet proof.
 

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I'll pick some nits here....and you missed the BB

I'm down with the Phil hubs all the way but as far as I know most road frames use 130mm OLN, OTOH if you are going to have something custom built.....Still if you need to buy a new 700C wheel in an emergency it will most likely have 130mmOLN. Those generator front hubs are just a bit too exotic for my tastes (I'll run a battery headlamp).

Sugino Crank. 100% agree. Inner ring change 80% agree, I did it on my Waterford gearie and it doesn't shift quite as well as the 26 did. Still if I am going to run low gears I want the lowest. Don't mess with the BB ;get a Phil.

Nitto Stuff...I don't care about these parts; performance wise anything is fine here-I use Salsa and Thompson.

Brooks B-17. I love my Brooks saddles; I like the Pro, Miss M uses the B-17.

Shimano Brake Levers. Hate 'em; Campy or Crane Creek for me.

Shimano Bar End Shifters. I agree about not using STI on real touring bikes; I use down tube shifters (not the best choice for most folks though).

Stronglight A9 Headset. Are you kidding? Chris King all the way.

Shimano XT Rear/LX Front derailleurs. I'm using both XT and XTR rears; if you want to spend money get the XTR otherwise the XT works just as well. I use Ultegra Triple front derailleurs-don't really like them but I have them (maybe I'll give the LX a try-thanks for the tip).

Rims-I run Open Pros but I am pulling a BOB and not using panniers. If you really want tough wheels get hold of some 40 or 48h rims mated to your Phil Hubs.

Spokes-Straight 14s for me and nothing but brass nipples ever.

Velox Rim tape-love the stuff.

Tires- Panaracer are ok and I run them sometimes although my favorites are Contis "Top Touring 2000". Tubes-who cares buy what is on sale just don't ever run "lite" or "Superlite".

Shimano Cantis-Heck no, get Paul!

Fenders-Stainless or Honjo.

All those racks and bags-one word BOB (now isn't that easier?).

Shimano Skewers. Dura Ace of course.

Steel bottle cages, SPD pedals, 2 layers of Cinelli cork tape (black on top). Zephal frame fit pump, large Polar waterbottles and a nice brass bell.


BTW great list Todd.
 

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I built mine based on parts I had laying around.

9S Alloy Chorus Ergo levers, RD, FD.
1995ish Dura Ace crankset with salsa 39/48
I am currently using an old 103mm DA bottom bracket. I trashed the PW one in the floods this year. As I type, it is winging it's way back to me after being overhauled to a new condition for $35. A good reason to go Phil.
Tektro brakes for long reach.
Thomson stem, salsa short and shallow bars.
Ultegra hubs 3X32 with salsa rims 14g with brass.
Armadillo tires.
28-38mm tubes.
It works for me.
 

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Yes but is that really a touring bike.

bigbill said:
I built mine based on parts I had laying around.

9S Alloy Chorus Ergo levers, RD, FD.
1995ish Dura Ace crankset with salsa 39/48
I am currently using an old 103mm DA bottom bracket. I trashed the PW one in the floods this year. As I type, it is winging it's way back to me after being overhauled to a new condition for $35. A good reason to go Phil.
Tektro brakes for long reach.
Thomson stem, salsa short and shallow bars.
Ultegra hubs 3X32 with salsa rims 14g with brass.
Armadillo tires.
28-38mm tubes.
It works for me.
Or a commuter? You are not running any kind of low gear for loaded touring with that 39t inner ring although I do like your choice of a 48t outer.
 

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MB1 said:
Or a commuter? You are not running any kind of low gear for loaded touring with that 39t inner ring although I do like your choice of a 48t outer.
I could put a triple on it but would have to change the bottom bracket. The ergo levers will do a triple and I think that they are more comfortable than STI for long rides. I plan on buying panniers before I leave for Italy next Spring. My LBS has them in stock so I will try them for fit and heel clearance. Rear panniers only since my intention is to use them for running errands and living without a car for 8 months. I might be able to swap out the RD for a medium cage and run a 29. A 39X29 is a nice climbing gear even with a load. I took a ton of pictures yesterday, I will try to post tonight. Nice luau shots.
 

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Not to hijack this thread or anything....

bigbill said:
I took a ton of pictures yesterday, I will try to post tonight. Nice luau shots.
...but I miss 2 finger day old poi, kalua pig, lau lau, squid luau, lomi salmon, haupia cake and even a little bit of black dog on the side.:(
 

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To keep this thread going,

I just rode around some pretty hilly stuff for three days and my lowest gear was a 39/34. I never HAD to stand but I also feel like I may carry another 10 pounds of weight on the bike in the future.


Question: What is the worst case gearing ratio you want on your touring rig?
 

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A 24X34 is nice to have.

bigrider said:
To keep this thread going,

I just rode around some pretty hilly stuff for three days and my lowest gear was a 39/34. I never HAD to stand but I also feel like I may carry another 10 pounds of weight on the bike in the future.


Question: What is the worst case gearing ratio you want on your touring rig?
If you want to figure it out for yourself this is what you do. (I'm not joking about this BTW).

1) Find out what your walking speed is pushing your fully loaded rig up the steepest hill you can find. (2-3mph likely).

2) Calculate what gear you would have to turn at 60 rpm to just beat that speed riding.

3) Put that gear on your bike. Anything slower than that you can walk just fine. For me anything lower than about 20 gear inches is time to walk but I don't like to walk so I run 24X34. :eek:
 

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MB1 said:
If you want to figure it out for yourself this is what you do. (I'm not joking about this BTW).

1) Find out what your walking speed is pushing your fully loaded rig up the steepest hill you can find. (2-3mph likely).

2) Calculate what gear you would have to turn at 60 rpm to just beat that speed riding.

3) Put that gear on your bike. Anything slower than that you can walk just fine. For me anything lower than about 20 gear inches is time to walk but I don't like to walk so I run 24X34. :eek:

According to calculations my 39/34 gives me a speed of 5.5 mph with a cadence of 60 rpms. I can walk pretty fast but not that 5.5 mph fast.
 

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Your problem is that 39 tooth chainring.

bigrider said:
According to calculations my 39/34 gives me a speed of 5.5 mph with a cadence of 60 rpms. I can walk pretty fast but not that 5.5 mph fast.
There is a reason touring bicycles are equipped with triples.

I have several 172.5 and 165 Ultegra Triple cranksets gathering dust if it would help.......
 
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