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Just thought I'd add yet another question about carbon fiber....But, something I noticed at a coffee break after a group ride when all the bikes were lined up....Some had UHMG others has OCLV, some had high-modulus......And I was hoping someone here could shed some light.

I see that many companies advertise their carbon fiber as high modulus or ultra-high modulus carbon fiber.....I wonder if this description of how high a modulus the fibers are corresponds to the grade and strength (or perhaps stiffness) of the carbon fiber used to build any given frame....Or am I misinterpreting the level of modulus of the carbon as something it is not....
However, if it does refer to the strength/stiffness, then in that sense, would it not be advantageous to use multiple levels of modulus of CF in a frame for varying sections (i.e. bb - ultra high, seat tube - not so high?)? Of course, this is all assuming the frame is built by expert hands and technique....



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02tones02 said:
Just thought I'd add yet another question about carbon fiber....But, something I noticed at a coffee break after a group ride when all the bikes were lined up....Some had UHMG others has OCLV, some had high-modulus......And I was hoping someone here could shed some light.

I see that many companies advertise their carbon fiber as high modulus or ultra-high modulus carbon fiber.....I wonder if this description of how high a modulus the fibers are corresponds to the grade and strength (or perhaps stiffness) of the carbon fiber used to build any given frame....Or am I misinterpreting the level of modulus of the carbon as something it is not....
However, if it does refer to the strength/stiffness, then in that sense, would it not be advantageous to use multiple levels of modulus of CF in a frame for varying sections (i.e. bb - ultra high, seat tube - not so high?)? Of course, this is all assuming the frame is built by expert hands and technique.
Seems like you already think you know the answer. The real answer is that there are a lot of factors that go into the design and manufacture of any frame, regardless of the material, and that when you focus on just one of those factors, you start wasting a lot of time. Note that manufacturers already do what you suggest, varying the material, layup, tube shape, and wall thickness to obtain their design goals.

The thing that higher modulus CF does is allow a quality designer/builder to produce a slightly lighter frame with the same properties as a slightly heavier frame would have with the lower modulus CF. This is functionally analogous to using a better alloy of metal, be it steel, aluminum, or titanium. Of course, these frames are more expensive than their lower line cousins. Whether the weight savings is important to you, only you can answer.
 
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