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eminence grease
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I went for an MTB ride today, the first in a long, long, time. I didn't have to tax my aging memory by having to remember to throw the proper gear in the car (como El Señor Davido), because where I live I can just ride down the street and get on a ditch road and go, go, go.

After struggling and swearing at my SID shock which was way too wimpy, I remembered that it was a reverse load, as in more air = more wimpy. So after blowing fork oil all over my hands and trying to make 3 different shock pumps work, I was on my way.

I went up the street and down one of the ditch roads to another street. It hasn't rained or snowed here in months, because all my RBR friends in Colorado are draining the storms before they come down here so it was quite sandy.

At the end of the second road, I crossed the anti-car barriers and rode south for a bit, using the first irrigation gate bridge to cross the Corrales Lateral. Tricky for an old guy with crappy balance. I headed north and crossed the Riverside Drain about a mile up the ditch. The Drain is cool, it's a stream to nowhere. It has no inflow and no outflow, it's there only to pull the water out of the surrounding fields by lowering the water table. It's sparkling clean provides a home for a nice population of introduced trout.

There are but 2 bridges (to speak of) across the Drain and one is thankfully close to my house. Up and over and up the steep levee bank and I was on my way for a fast run north to the Harvey Jones Flood Control Channel.

It being a beautiful day marred only by the ugly-ass winds I saw only one woman walking her Irish Setter which kindly chose not to attack me.

At Harvey Jones I was gasping, I'd forgotten how much harder driving a Garbage Truck was than a Ferrari - MTBing is tough, it required no brains (of which I have a lot) and lots of brawn (of which I have little.) I stopped to take a drink and admire the Jones Project, now a sandy, desolate patch of nothingness that you can see at the top of my map.

I turned around and headed back, deciding to ride in the Bosque instead of on the top of the levee. The Bosque is the largest Cottonwood forest in the world and has been a protected Nature Conservancy area for the last 20 years. No more dumping of construction debris by the indiginous population. The trail in there is quite challenging, not North Shore challenging, but challenging enough for someone with lots of brains, no brawn and crappy balance. Many twisty, turny passages that all look the same with a decent share of roots and sandy patches. I passed two doofusi with knit caps that were staring at a tree. They looked very guilty when they saw me, maybe some same-sex scientist love tryst in the woods or something. I took that route all the way back to the 2nd bridge across the Drain and back on home.

What did I learn you might ask? Well, people don't go out walking when the wind is howling and it's nice to ride fat tires once in a while. I may do it more often. Or maybe not.
 

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Yo no fui.
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Gettin' rid of that suspension fork will help you out.
 

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Yo no fui.
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8,081 Posts
You go around the rocks and let the bike roll over 'em.
 

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Mountain biking is fun. I've been riding road for about 10 years, with a little mountain biking. Been mountain biking on weekends this winter. Went for a road ride today - too wet in the woods. Better sounds in the woods - birds and quiet vs. cars and trucks. Woods seem safer. Too many cars and trucks on road. I stopped at a light and an 18 wheeler pulled up beside me. Never used to notice the cars and trucks as much. Enjoy the trails.
 

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I Am a Meat Popsicle
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terry b said:
It would certainly get me out the door faster.

But I'm old, can my wrists stand the jarring?
try a rigid 29'er....(or so i hear) haven't built mine up yest so we'll see....
 

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terry b said:
I turned around and headed back, deciding to ride in the Bosque instead of on the top of the levee. The Bosque is the largest Cottonwood forest in the world and has been a protected Nature Conservancy area for the last 20 years. No more dumping of construction debris by the indiginous population. The trail in there is quite challenging, not North Shore challenging, but challenging enough for someone with lots of brains, no brawn and crappy balance. Many twisty, turny passages that all look the same with a decent share of roots and sandy patches. I passed two doofusi with knit caps that were staring at a tree. They looked very guilty when they saw me, maybe some same-sex scientist love tryst in the woods or something. I took that route all the way back to the 2nd bridge across the Drain and back on home.

QUOTE]

As part of the indiginous population (grandmother from Isleta Pueblo) I am wondering what construction debris the indiginous population has dumped in th bosque. Visit Isleta sometime, our bosque is much cleaner than that in the Corrales area where there are not many natives. Maybe the debris was dumped by the new people who have moved in the last one or two hundred years or so.

Glad to hear the report. I am missing the cottonwoods, now that I am in London. Not missing the winds and the blowing dirt though.
 

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eminence grease
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Dude - I wasn't slamming the real indiginous population, I was slammng the Corraleños who I suspect have been dumping in the Bosque for the last 50 years or so judging from the construction debris, cans and broken glass. The only truly indiginous remains I know of is one big mound from an ancient pueblo which I hardly think would qualify as trash.

Bad choice of words on my behalf, sorry for that.
 
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