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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm a DYI guy - only exception in my 20 year lifespan being a stubborn cassette lockring - and will likely face my first crown race "job" in the next week.

Not-so-original case of wanting to avoid using the "proper" removal tool because of price, but I saw the hammer/punch or screwdriver method.


Seeing how much that guy scratched up the fork and had the screwdriver deflecting about, I'm just wondering if I risk denting/bending the profile of the race, and if there's ideal measures to take when doing this to make things easier/less likely to be ****ed up?

Also:
-what's the most ideal way to clamp the fork while I do this?
-A little uneasy about the hammer/screwdriver method of re-installation, I've heard of the PVC pipe method, and the hammer/stem method. Not sure which/any are (most) ideal. :confused:


...OR, is the risk for total fail so high should I really just go to the LBS?
 

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Depending on the fork, if it's got a spot to pry from, I'll use an old screwdriver to pry up (wrap with tape or old tube to avoid scratching, similar method as your video... Otherwise, a drift punch & hammer.
To install, a length of 1 1/4" pvc pipe (both ends cut square), scrap piece of 2x4(to hammer on the top of pvc) + hammer. Make sure your fork is supported under the crown, don't hammer with dropouts on your concrete floor :aureola: . I use a schmear of grease or anti-sieze between race & fork.
 

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another idea for removal, I saw over at mtbr at some point is to use a "bearing separator".
I've been keeping my eye out at harbor freight for a small size one, but they don't seem to carry it anymore, except in a kit.

 

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The screwdriver/hammer method works fine, unless you've got a fork w/ an integrated fork crown. Since they're wider, the integrated crowns make it hard to find a spot big enough to fit the screwdriver on when you whack it. Had to take one to a shop recently for that very reason...i think they charged me 10 bucks to remove the race. With the non-integrated crowns, the race sits out far enough that there's plenty of room to work with. Just take your time with it...little taps all the way around.
 

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Hammer and screwdriver. If your screwdriver is too blunt, try a wood chisel to get it started, they have a nice thin angle and sharp edge . Make sure it's an expendable wood chisel though cause you will probably dull the edge a bit but it will definitely get it started and then you can switch to a screwdriver. go back and for the on opposite edges (but you probably figured on doing that anyway) Me? I use a pin punch and hammer, and no, if you use either method and work to keep the race fairly even in it's removal, you won't damage or warp anything.
 

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martinrjensen said:
Hammer and screwdriver. If your screwdriver is too blunt, try a wood chisel to get it started, they have a nice thin angle and sharp edge . Make sure it's an expendable wood chisel though cause you will probably dull the edge a bit but it will definitely get it started and then you can switch to a screwdriver. go back and for the on opposite edges (but you probably figured on doing that anyway) Me? I use a pin punch and hammer, and no, if you use either method and work to keep the race fairly even in it's removal, you won't damage or warp anything.
I use one of these double ended razor blade/box cutter blades to get started. Tap it in with a small hammer, working my way around.

 

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The PVC pipe method works like a charm. Make sure the end you're putting over the crown is square, the other end isn't as important, you can cap it off w/ a PVC cap or not, doesn't matter. I normally turn the fork upside down when installing. So the end of the PVC pipe is resting on the concrete floor, use a 2x4, 2x2, whatever you have, on top before hammering her home. Don't need a lot of force, I find a few good taps does the trick!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Coincidences...

turbomatic73 said:
The screwdriver/hammer method works fine, unless you've got a fork w/ an integrated fork crown. Since they're wider, the integrated crowns make it hard to find a spot big enough to fit the screwdriver on when you whack it. Had to take one to a shop recently for that very reason...i think they charged me 10 bucks to remove the race. With the non-integrated crowns, the race sits out far enough that there's plenty of room to work with. Just take your time with it...little taps all the way around.
I'm dealing with integrated forks, and my LBS is saying the job would be $10.

I think I'll try spotting something like the razor blade as fixed mentioned first, then if it doesn't look like a job ahead of me, 10 bucks won't kill me.

Thanks for the tips everyone.

Optimus: what do you mean be "square"? You mean like, flat?
 

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nashbar has a crown race remover that I think I paid about $14 (sale + discount code), kind of similar to the previously posted bearing remover. It works (well), I've used it 4 or 5 times now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Fork came much sooner than expected.

In short, this "job" turned into a joke. The supplied crown race on my current (well, previous) wasn't nearly as difficult to budge like the one in the video I posted. However, I'm a bit weirded by how it isn't a full loop. I double (triple [quadruple]) checked if it was just made like that, and it seems so. The gap was a clean and vertical finish on both ends, and the race followed the profile of the steerer perfectly.

Re-installation to the new fork was simple as well therefore. I covered the screwdriver head with several layers of index card (I was acting too fast on it..hehe).

One minor issue is the star-nut. Seems to rise up a bit easily. I know it shouldn't be torqued so much, but I also know that Wolf forks have a wider inner diameter. Will look into that this weekend.

But nonetheless, excitement took over, I did a brief climb for this off-day. I won't note improvement as it's really just a matter of excitement, but nothing asploded. Yay :D

Thank again everyone.
 

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The split crown race is pretty common these days, makes for easy intall/de?stall:idea: :thumbsup:
So, you installed a regular star fangled nut and it's pulling out a bit?
No biggie if you got your headset/stem torqued properly, since all it's really for is preloading the headset...
I've had to splay out the "spades" of a star-fangled nut to get it to grab before. Moving fwd you may want to look into one of those new fangled wedge type nut/topcap systems.
 

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Another easy way to install is to drill a 1 1/8 hole in a a 3/4 piece of wood. Put the wood in a vise & shove the fork onto it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
logbiter said:
The split crown race is pretty common these days, makes for easy intall/de?stall:idea: :thumbsup:
So, you installed a regular star fangled nut and it's pulling out a bit?
No biggie if you got your headset/stem torqued properly, since all it's really for is preloading the headset...
I've had to splay out the "spades" of a star-fangled nut to get it to grab before. Moving fwd you may want to look into one of those new fangled wedge type nut/topcap systems.
Star fangled nut was supplied.

I figured that the stem can do the preloading, and the cap + star fangled nut were there as an ideal redundancy in case the stem slipped. Been riding worry free, but yeah, I'm planning to go the LBS and get a better fitting nut. Thanks for the input.
 
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