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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gearing up for a 4 day stage race in a months time and I'd like some advice on how to train, prepare, and warm up for the stage 2 uphill TT which is a 9 mile climb. I'll be coming off a circuit race the day before. This is my first season in cat 4 and been to several crit clinics sponsored by my club but I'm not sure if I can apply the same warm up techniques. I've raced mostly crits and RR's but never ridden a TT. What should I expect and what's the best way to peak for it? It should be fun and I can't wait!---paa
 

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9 mile is a long climb

...that being said...warm up thoroughly, i raced a series of time trials last year for the first time and the thing i learned most was that you have to thoroughly warm-up. take your trainer with you and spin up gradually to do about 1min at max effort then cool back down or better yet warm up on the route. i have a great article about training for TT's i pulled off the net, if you are interested i will copy it and mail it to you as i cannot find the link anymore. send me your address. [email protected]
 

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Here's what I would do...

A nine mile hill climb may take about 30 minutes to complete. I'd schedule a 30 minute time trial test in the next couple weeks. Plan to do an out-and-back route. Find a flat stretch of road with no interuptions (lights, stops, etc.) Warm up thoroughly before you begin. Ride the 30 minutes as fast as you can. Track you AVG. HR for the entire 30 minutes. That number will be very important. Basically, it is the highest HR you can maintain for 30 minutes.

During a regular TT, you would want to keep your HR right at the average or slightly higher. A hill climb TT inreases your HR slightly due to the climbing involved. Because this is a stage race, I'd plan to keep my HR right below the avg. This should keep you from going to hard and allow you to recover for the stages that follow.

biknben
 

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Careful of Heart Rate

"Track you AVG. HR for the entire 30 minutes. That number will be very important. Basically, it is the highest HR you can maintain for 30 minutes."

Unless on the day of the race compared to the day of the test you got more or less sleep, the temperature is hotter or colder, you had more or less caffeine, you're more or less nervous, etc. Heart rate is only a very approximate guage of effort and using only a single test will almost definitely give you wrong numbers. Better would be to do the test as described but carefully note your perceived exertion. During the race, try to maintain that same level of effort.

As for going too hard in the TT. I don't think that's possible in a stage race. Going as hard as you can in the TT can gain you time which will be much harder to come by in the following stages. If you're tired the next day from the TT, sit in and maintain your GC position. That will be better overall than holding back in the TT, and then trying to make up time in a road stage or crit.
 

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He just said "uphill", it's probably not safe to guess it will take 30 minutes either. That would only be slighly uphill.

It could just as easily be 45 minutes or even as extreme as an hour and a half if it's a really brutal "uphill".

All that could really change strategy right?

Ben
 

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Up hill time trial

You don't give a whole lot of information to go on, like what is the average gradient for the 9 miles. Your warmup should not be radically different than it is for any race or crit, except that since it is a single sustained effort, you may not need or want to do any particularily hard efforts in warmups (eg jumps). A wind trainer is a great way to warm up for this type of effort. For a 45-60 minute tt I would only do about 20-30 minutes warmup (others would definetely do more). I want to be warmed up, but not drain my energy reserves.

If this race has a history, see if you can check last years results and times for the cat. 4's. Unless the weather is radically different than this year the times should be similar this year (ringers excluded).

Finally, and most importantly the value of pre-riding or scouting the route cannot be overestimated. If you can pre-ride the course you can get an excellent idea of what gearing and equipment will best serve your purpose. For example, is the climb fast enought that aero bars and wheels will improve your time, or is it a 10mph grunt fest where lighter is better, do you need a 25, 26, or 27 low gear, can you do it with one waterbottle or do you need two? Is there any stategy to be applied (eg. save something for the final ramp or switchback etc? If the climb is local to you, do it until you really know it. An uphill time trial is particularily tough because if you crack it may be impossible to regroup.

Good luck and have fun.

jhr
 

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Knowing the hill is key

I agree with that sentiment.

I am a poor climber, however there is one 1.4 mile climb where I do all of my hill repeats. I know every turn, every pitch change and every nuance of that 1.4 miles.

When I'm doing balls-out rides with my team, the climbers always eventually drop me on the long or steep climbs. However, I've never been dropped on "my" climb. I know exactly where I can make some time, where I should back off a little, and how to guage my pace so I can hammer the last 30 seconds or so.

You probably don't have the opportunity to learn the TT course this well, but knowledge has proven to be king to me.

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Here's a link to the Race web page

30 minutes!! The pro's barely cracked that record last year, and not just any pro - Tom Danileson (He actually went way under 30 min's) !!

That is a fun climb and you should be doing it at least once a week.
If you are in Pasadena it should only take 20min. to get there without traffic.

http://www.geocities.com/pvsr2004/
 

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TT's

Don't lose sight of the fact this is a TT, a great time to make up time if you're feeling strong. Sit in and hang on the next day if you have to. Personally I use to love uphill TT's when I was racing, finding the hardest part of the climb and picking it up a notch, knowing that everyone else was hurting as I was. Best of luck, have a great race !

PSB
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Pvsr

853 said:
30 minutes!! The pro's barely cracked that record last year, and not just any pro - Tom Danileson (He actually went way under 30 min's) !!

That is a fun climb and you should be doing it at least once a week.
If you are in Pasadena it should only take 20min. to get there without traffic.

http://www.geocities.com/pvsr2004/
That's the race I'm signed up for. As a matter of fact, it's one of our club's training rides. But instead we've always decended the 9 mile course. We plan to do recon several times before the race. They say between 35-45 minutes is a good barometer for cat 4's up GMR.
 

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paa said:
That's the race I'm signed up for. As a matter of fact, it's one of our club's training rides. But instead we've always decended the 9 mile course. We plan to do recon several times before the race. They say between 35-45 minutes is a good barometer for cat 4's up GMR.
dont go all out right off in the first half, cause you will die at the end. If you just back off a tiny bit say before 1/3 the way through, you can finish really strong at the end.

woof.
 

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yes, longer

paa said:
Gearing up for a 4 day stage race in a months time and I'd like some advice on how to train, prepare, and warm up for the stage 2 uphill TT which is a 9 mile climb. I'll be coming off a circuit race the day before. This is my first season in cat 4 and been to several crit clinics sponsored by my club but I'm not sure if I can apply the same warm up techniques. I've raced mostly crits and RR's but never ridden a TT. What should I expect and what's the best way to peak for it? It should be fun and I can't wait!---paa
We have a 6.5 mile climb tt here that takes 40-55 minutes, with 2800 feet gain. You essentially prepare for and ride it just like a flat tt, with few exceptions. 1. Take low gears, unless you *know* you can keep your rpms up around 90-100 in every gear you have. I've done lots of testing, and I've found that I'm much faster on climbs with gears low enough to allow me to spin everywhere. Your body is a motor, and it really doesn't distinguish much between climbing and flats, except a bit for body position. Naturally, you won't be hunkered down on aerobars on a 10% grade climb. 2. For some hills, there are flatter and steeper parts. If I know there is a really steep part coming up, I back off just a little in the flatter area before to have a little reserve. 3. If you have a climbing bike stripped down in weight, use rock hard tubular tires and, again, low gears. You may not even need a large chainring or rear brake (the dispensing with the front derailleur and front shifter/rear brake lever -- route the front brake cable to the right shifter/lever). This is a time trial, so I assume you want to save every last second. I made a climbing bike doing it this way with my Bianchi EV2 that got down to 12.5 pounds with Zipp 303 wheels and light tubulars. It at least *felt* fast.
 

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DougSloan said:
3. If you have a climbing bike stripped down in weight, use rock hard tubular tires and, again, low gears. You may not even need a large chainring or rear brake
At least for a USCF or ACA race, you'll need a brake on each wheel unless you're riding a fixed gear, in which case you only need a front brake.
 

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oops

asgelle said:
At least for a USCF or ACA race, you'll need a brake on each wheel unless you're riding a fixed gear, in which case you only need a front brake.
Oops, you're right; sorry.

I see from the USCF rules that as off 2007 all bikes must conform to UCI specs, too, if I read correctly, so there go those sub 15 pound bikes.
 

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paa....are you a skinny climber?

GMR is not that tough a climb in training. Racing it is a whole other matter. Last year it took me 45 minutes and change to do it (Masters 35+, I was passed TWICE by Thurlow Rogers, before and after his flat). I was pleased with that as I am more of a sprinter than a climber. If you do the climb in 30 minutes you will win Cat IV, no doubt. I think the winning time in the IV's last year was 37 and change (though I may be wrong). I was looking forward to PVSR this year but haven't been riding hardly at all since last Sept. (long story and telling it makes me angry). Good luck, and as 853 said, you should ride it often as you are not that far from it. (I ride from Claremont to do Chantry Flats quite often, very similar distance and climb). A little advice, it starts a little steep and then eases up in the middle and then kicks up again before you go onto the backside of the mountain. Also, save some for the backside as it really mellows out and you can push hard and make up some time. On another note, do you do Montrose? I haven't done it since Sept. but I am pretty easy to spot (fully sleeved with tattoos). It will be awhile before I am back out there, but if you see me say hi. (I am assuming you ride for Merryl Lynch from your name.)
 
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