Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
as im putting on the tire and it gets to the last 4-5 inches... where it gets impossible...
is it safe to use the tire lever to help me force it up? or is it going to bend the rim outward?
 

·
vexatious enigma
Joined
·
4,696 Posts
You shouldn't have to, but it's perfectly fine to do so.

Ive never had to use a lever to get the tire on. Normally what I do when it gets towards the end and gets hard Ill go to the opposite side wiggle the tire and try again. If I'm still having trouble Ill let some air out of the tube then go at it again. Ive also had major problems with getting the bead on whenever I have cheap tires with too stiff of a bead on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,635 Posts
Being good and being careful

daivs_T said:
as im putting on the tire and it gets to the last 4-5 inches... where it gets impossible... is it safe to use the tire lever to help me force it up? or is it going to bend the rim outward?
It's not going to bend the rim, but you do risk pinching the tube and causing a puncture. The first thing to do is to make sure that you have centered the bead of the tire in the rim before you try to get that last bit on. This makes sure that the bead is in the smallest circumfrence of the rim, making it easier to mount the tire. If you've done that, and you still can't get the tire on (even when using the butt of the palm of your hand to work it into place) then you may find tire levers to be your only option. Just be careful that you have the tube fully worked into place and that you don't get the tube between the tire lever and the rim - doing that will likely puncture the tube. This will then cause frustration and the occasional use of bad language, not suitable for children.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,473 Posts
In my experience, it's one of the following:

1. You might need to work on your tire mounting techique. There are various online sources on proper way to mount a tire. Basically hold the wheel against your gut and work the tire onto the rim so the last few inches are on the outside of the wheel(not the part against your gut). As you work the tire around the rim, it's very important to get the tire bead in the center of the rim as that is the deepest part. It allows the most room the mount the last few inches...

2. If your techique is good, than you might have a bad tire/rim combination......not all tires work with certain rims...

Others might disagree but I will never use a tire that needs a lever to mount....I'd hate to be stuck somewhere with a tire that won't go on the rim..
 

·
Adorable Furry Hombre
Joined
·
30,945 Posts
Dave Hickey said:
2. If your techique is good, than you might have a bad tire/rim combination......not all tires work with certain rims...

Personally I will never use a tire that needs a lever to mount....I'd hate to be stuck somewhere with a tire that won't go on the rim..
Also Campy rims are notorious for being on the large side, and just about any tire will be a bear to get on and off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Dave Hickey said:
In my experience, it's one of the following:

1. You might need to work on your tire mounting techique. There are various online sources on proper way to mount a tire. Basically hold the wheel against your gut and work the tire onto the rim so the last few inches are on the outside of the wheel(not the part against your gut). As you work the tire around the rim, it's very important to get the tire bead in the center of the rim as that is the deepest part. It allows the most room the mount the last few inches...

2. If your techique is good, than you might have a bad tire/rim combination......not all tires work with certain rims...

Others might disagree but I will never use a tire that needs a lever to mount....I'd hate to be stuck somewhere with a tire that won't go on the rim..
I agree with everything said about technique. However, I never hesitate to use tire levers, because they are a tool intended to make this job easier, so why not use them. Just take care not to pinch the tube. I carry two plastic levers in my tiny seat pack and they take up virtually no space and weigh next to nothing. I tend to use them more on the road than at home, mainly because when I'm changing a tire on the road, I'm feeling some sort of time pressure (others in ride, late for work on the commute, etc.).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,473 Posts
Camilo said:
I agree with everything said about technique. However, I never hesitate to use tire levers, because they are a tool intended to make this job easier, so why not use them. Just take care not to pinch the tube. I carry two plastic levers in my tiny seat pack and they take up virtually no space and weigh next to nothing. I tend to use them more on the road than at home, mainly because when I'm changing a tire on the road, I'm feeling some sort of time pressure (others in ride, late for work on the commute, etc.).

I hear you....I carry and use levers but I only use them to remove the tire...not to mount.... A tire can safely be mounted using the lever but personally, I'd rather not risk puncturing a new tube in doing so...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
952 Posts
Put on your gloves and roll the last few inches. Two hands on the tire and roll towards the rim.. Or a worse idea is find a tire that fits your rim better. Some slip on like Cinderella's slipper.
 

·
Big is relative
Joined
·
11,887 Posts
I put a new set of Conti Gatorskin Ultras on my training wheelset today. The rear has a Mavic Open Sport rim and I needed a tire lever. The front is a CPX33 and I only needed my thumbs. For whatever reason.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
Use the butt of your hand to roll the tire on. Work on one side and then the other to get that last 4 or 5 inches on. You shouldn't need a tire lever unless you got weak hands.
 

·
still shedding season
Joined
·
8,849 Posts
Kerry Irons said:
The first thing to do is to make sure that you have centered the bead of the tire in the rim before you try to get that last bit on.
Just to clarify, make sure the bead is in the middle of the rim (where the spokes are) because that's the smallest diameter of the rim - at least that's what I think you're saying and it does help. This, Velox-type rim strips and putting some baby powder on your tubes so they slide a little easier all help.

I have wire-beaded tires on my old bike that are really tight. I'm able to get really close without using a lever, but this one was a huge help for the last few inches - "normal" levers would break. You only need one of these levers, and mine stays in the saddle bag on this bike.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top