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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I am a new roadie. I am 15, 140lb, 6ft and love competition. I love to mountain bike and currently, most of my biking gear is for mountain biking. I love doing triathlons. I have a few questions just trying to learn what to do below.

What Bike?
I don't have my own road bike and would like some help on what to get. I have been riding my Dad's Felt f4c fairly often. It pretty much stock but with some clip-on aero bars and a different saddle. I also ride a Old Cannonade (2003 I think) without aero bars fairly often and like it, but it is not as smooth, and I cannot maintain the same kind of speeds doing the same thing. I do like to do casual rides with my Dad for 10-50 miles where we just go at our own pace and see the sights. I also love to race and on the Felt, can maintain around a 20mph average for most ride. Triathlons are my primary "race" but so far, only in sprint distances. I would like to get into some longer distances eventually. Budget is limited at around $700 for the bike.

So I need to know. Do I get a road bike, or a tri-bike.

Can a try-bike be ridden for fun? I'm not sure I like that they don't have bar end shifters for when I'm cruising with a group.

Im thinking a decent used road bike, with clip on aero bars would be sufficient and as I save my money, a ff seat post, and maybe a wheel cover.

What Accessories to prioritize?
Let me start with what I have for Road riding
-A loose fitting Pearl Izumi Jersey
-some baggy MTB padded shorts (best I have)
-A Garneau Superleggera Aero Helmet
-X-lab delta 225 seat mount cage thing
-Kali Chakra MTB helmet

Thats pretty much it. Don't even have my own shoes. The Aero helmet and X-lab bottle cage were given to me by my friendly neighbor.

I obviously need to build up a stockpile but don't know where to start.

I know that a pair of shoes and matching pedals should probably be top priority. Is there any reason not to get MTB shoes with SPD pedals? They are just so much
 

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Hey buddy, there's a lot here, but I am going to try to keep it simple. The first thing you need to figure out is what kind of riding you really prefer. That is where you are going to determine what kind of bike you want to invest in and none of us can answer that for you. Fortunately for you, you have access to bikes and can sort of figure that out at your own pace (big props to your dad and your neighbor btw). I would say only spend your dinero on a tri bike if that becomes your primary passion and focus. They are fairly limited machines and you can clearly be competitive in triathlons without them. Getting a road bike (and better yet, an aero road bike) would allow you to cover all of your bases it seems. If you can stretch that budget some by earning some extra through a job or saving, bikes in that sector are becoming more affordable all of the time. Here are a few affordable bikes I like, but there are many others out there including used bikes. Make sure whatever you get fits you as well by taking it to a bike shop, etc.

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/road/allez-e5/115176

https://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/road/allez-dsw-sl-sprint-elite/118416

Émonda ALR 4 | Trek Bikes

Fuji Bikes | ROAD | COMPETITON SERIES | ROUBAIX 1.5

Performance Bike - bikes, bike accessories, bike gear, cycling equipment, cycling apparel, and more

FR40 - Felt Bicycles
 

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Get a road bike. It's more versatile and practical than a dedicated tri-bike. Install clip-on bars if you want. You're young, and haven't proven yourself to be some triathlete prodigy, so it's not like the equipment is going to mean the difference between 1st and 2nd place.

Tri-bikes don't have offer the variety of hand positions and the comfort of a more upright position; they just aren't meant for day-to-day use. A lot of group rides forbid riding on aero bars because of the less than quick access to the brake levers, meaning you might not be welcome on some group rides.

Yes; reuse your MTB shoes and pedals. Ignore any weight penalties.

Personally, I recommend a used bike for someone your age because you're likely to outgrow it in a year or three.

Get a pair of road shorts-you can MTB in them as well, and a better fitting road jersey.

You'll need a seat bag to carry your tools and tubes, etc. .

Many MTB helmets have removable visors; if yours does, remove it for road riding.

Ignore the seat cover and fancy seat post.

I'd prefer you NOT focus on the equipment; focus on the training (and fun). I'd rather see you spend your money on training books (or check the local libraries). The knowledge and experience you have the potential to gain will far outstrip any equipment choices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
cool. This is great information! I will go ahead and get a decent road bike and ride it till it dies.

this is a welcome change from MTB being told that spending money isn't mandatory. I have several hobbies and funding them all is rough. (need to narrow it down)

Curious as to how removing the visor would help? My helmet has a removable visor.
 

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you definitely need a speedometer to log distance, speed and avg speed.
I ride a lot of miles and only use the Bell Dashboard Multi Function Cyclocomputer
which is $15 delivered on Amazon.
I also bought cheap clipless Look Keo pedals and they work just fine. They were less than $30, in fact I bought a couple pair for my other bikes. The ones I bought aren't available anymore. There is a bunch of stuff you should get and other stuff you need, but there is a way to do it with spending as near much money as many do.
 
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