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la dolce vita
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I've heard stories about crappy builds on prebuilt wheels, but I have a set of Shimano 7800 Dura Ace wheels for 4 years or so and have had zero problems. In fact I've only had to true them once or twice. So that leads me to my question/story. My wife who weighs about 120 lbs and has a set of Velocity Spartacus wheels on her Colnago. We were doing the Independence Pass ride over the weekend and as she was climbing, a front spoke broke basically ending her day. Everyone that stopped to offer assitance said the same thing. Prebuilts suck. She doesn't have more than a few hundred miles on the wheels. Can we expect more breakage? Should we cut our loses, sell the wheels and go back to Open Pro's? Any thoughts?
 

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wheelbuilder
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Mootsie said:
I've heard stories about crappy builds on prebuilt wheels, but I have a set of Shimano 7800 Dura Ace wheels for 4 years or so and have had zero problems. In fact I've only had to true them once or twice. So that leads me to my question/story. My wife who weighs about 120 lbs and has a set of Velocity Spartacus wheels on her Colnago. We were doing the Independence Pass ride over the weekend and as she was climbing, a front spoke broke basically ending her day. Everyone that stopped to offer assitance said the same thing. Prebuilts suck. She doesn't have more than a few hundred miles on the wheels. Can we expect more breakage? Should we cut our loses, sell the wheels and go back to Open Pro's? Any thoughts?
Cut your losses.

-Eric
 

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Yep... better to get something else... or at least respoke those wheels and build them right. The build quality is the most important aspect, assuming that the components aren't junk.

Dura Ace wheels are rather expensive, so at least they are more likely to spend time building them properly. 3 years is meaningless... how many miles is that, and what kind of riding?
 

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It seems pretty unusual to break a front spoke, especially at low speeds. It may have just been a fluke. You might consider spending $10 on a Fiberfix kevlar spoke, so that if it happens again, at least it doesn't end her day.

My bike has pretty cheap wheels. I rode them for the 3000 miles before breaking my first spoke. I then broke two more over the next 1000 miles, but haven't broken any more in the last 3000 miles. All the broken spokes were on the drive side of the rear wheel. I like to think that I'm rid of the three bad spokes, and now I'm home free (knock on wood).
 

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Strange

velocity sparticus wheels have a good rep for being a strong deep v wheel. I used a set on my cyclocross bike for about a year with no problems, and our shop sold a lot of the 650c versions to recumbent riders, this was all about 4 years ago so maybe things at velocity have changed. However i would send the wheels back and make velocity respoke the front, there very good about taking care of problems. But like I always say it's very hard to beat some nice quality hubs built to some mavic open pros by a good wheelbuilder, there not that flashy but those kind of wheels usually last a long time. And you could definitly build them lighter than the sparticus wheels.
 

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Hand built

I have a pair of Velocity Nuvians ( Aerohead rims) that I ordered through superspokes.com. They had Velocity build them for me. The wheels arrived with a sticker on each wheel with the initials of the person who built the wheel. I am under the impression that this indeed makes them handbuilt. Am I wrong?

I guess what I'm saying is aren't all Velocity wheels handbuilt?

If so and the spoke tension was good then perhaps your experience is just extremely bad luck. Doesn't help I know.
 

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dbeltramini77 said:
I guess what I'm saying is aren't all Velocity wheels handbuilt?
A handbuilt wheel isn't necessarily better than machine built. Somebody could just stick all the spokes in and true the wheel with minimal tension... that would still be handbuilt, but it would suck. The key issue is whether they did all the stress relieving, spoke-line improving, and proper (high and balanced) tension. This a time consuming job, and one that takes a fair amount of skill... and it just isn't done on cheap wheels.
 
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