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I'm going to start riding with my GoPro on the bike mainly for evidence if something were to happen on the roads. My question, is it better to have it mounted on the handlebars facing forward or the seatpost facing back? I'm thinking handlebars facing forward would be the best option if I only have one camera. I'm already overly cautious, as especially when by myself, I wear a hi-viz jersey, and have flashing lights front and rear.
 

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If you are that concerned about the dangers of riding your bike, maybe you should take up bowling instead.
 

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Thanks for your smart ass answer. Sorry I want to be safe while riding. I guess you've never had any close calls. Or maybe you're family doesn't give a **** if you die.
jamesh,

Chill. He was not being a smart ass. Cycling is fraught with risk, we take it every time we throw a leg over the bike. I have had plenty of close calls including one with a GoPro on both front and back of the bike. It doesn't prevent anything. Only help they were was to provide the police officers who responded with clear cut evidence that the driver in question passed me close enough I could have grabbed his coffee mug from his truck.

Bottom line is, if you want to be completely safe, take up a different sport. If you want to enjoy some great miles and sights, stick with cycling.

The best way to be safe when cycling is situational awareness, know what is happening around you at all times. Anticipate drivers, ride predictably and responsibly. Being safe comes from YOU not an electronic device.

Have a great day and I hope that you decide to do a rectal-cranial extraction.

EEC
 

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I would use it facing forward as that is where most of my situations come from. People making a right turn in front of me to be exact.

However the GoPro will not make cycling safer. It will make it less safe if you interact with it while riding. All it will do is document a situation and can be your friend or your enemy in court depending on who is at fault. Also your GPS documents your ride as it happens.

As far as road side situations people will not notice your GoPro. They will take notice of your cell phone when you push record and are capturing their language and behavior. That may work and it may escalate the situation. Hard to say. If they appear to be violent it's a good idea to step out of your shoes in case it comes to fight or flight.
 

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Great Advise from ExChiefinMA !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The best way to be safe when cycling is situational awareness, know what is happening around you at all times. Anticipate drivers, ride predictably and responsibly. Being safe comes from YOU not an electronic device.
 

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A camera is just a cheap insurance policy as it will never stop a two-ton metal mass. Personally, I'd go with a helmet mount if I were you. That way the camera can see both the front and back, and it's especially useful in proving if a motorist was using their cell phone while driving because the camera points where you're looking. If you want to get a motorist ticketed without a cop witnessing the violation, you have to be able to identify who was operating the vehicle, which a front or back mounted camera rarely does.
 

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jBottom line is, if you want to be completely safe, take up a different sport.
Nice straw man, but no matter how hard I squeeze what the OP wrote, I can't get a drop that says he(?) was looking for the GoPro to make him safer. He recognizes there are risks in riding on the road and is looking only to get evidence in case something bad happens.

Me, I plan to get a GoPro or Virb for the front and a Fly6 for the back.
 

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The OP clearly said they want the camera to gather evidence, there was no expectation of it making them safer, not sure where all this commentary about safety is coming from?


And you should definitely ride with a camera. Two months ago I had a driver intentionally try and run me off the road (I was going 22mph on a 20mph residential street in my own neighborhood) I caught him at the intersection and confronted him, he claimed I was in his way, threatened to get out and beat me up, then proceeded to turn his wheel and drive into me before taking off. I chased after him but only managed to get a couple of digits of his plate since he was driving 35+ mph to get away from me. Went to the police, but with only a description and a not enough evidence they couldn't do anything about it.

My wife was working for GoPro at the time so have a bunch lying around, but the cameras are kind of worthless for this kind of thing because the battery only lasts 1.5-2hrs, even if I had been running one it would have been dead by the time this incident happened. I promptly went out and got myself a Cycliq Fly 12 which has about an 8hr battery life. I already caught two incidents on the camera that had I been hurt or something it would have provided good evidence. They also make a rear light/camera combo


This also happened recently near me. Another good use of the camera




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I've got the Fly12 up front and a Fly6 in back. Primarily I got them as a cheap insurance policy so my wife can avenge my mangled corpse. I also like that they have blinking lights that do actually help with some measure of safety.

The only interesting thing I've ever recorded on my rides was a homeless man peeing his pants in the middle of the road. I just tried to keep quiet and calm and simply moved around him when the light turned green.
 

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Sure, but who carries a bike lock on training/recreational rides?


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Why not have one member of the party stay with the bikes? Then when everyone else comes outside that person can go into the store.
 

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If you only have money for one, then helmet is the best imho. But if you can afford two then then helmet and rear. You are almost allways facing front and if you have to get off the bike then the camera comes with you to keep recording.
Police love video, it makes the he said/he said argument moot, video doesn't lie. Trust me give a good cop video of a person in a car being a complete ass, they will go to town on that person.


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The OP clearly said they want the camera to gather evidence, there was no expectation of it making them safer, not sure where all this commentary about safety is coming from?
From the OP before he edited his second comment.

However I would agree with the helmet cam comment. Of course your neck has to support the weight. For me that would be a problem but I am not going to get a camera anyway. I'm not a big gadget guy myself. My Garmin quit working a couple days ago and I decided not to replace it. I have my phone with me anyway so I am using the android app.
 

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Cameras won't really help keep you safe, but can be invaluable when it comes to seeking damages or charges. Often drivers are so oblivious that they may have caused an accident and drive off so quickly they didn't even know anything happened. Or they can claim the cyclist just fell on his own, the car never touched them....

Without any actual evidence, it's very hard for officials to do anything about it and the cyclist always gets the raw end of the deal. Cars will just get a scratch, but we get broken bones if we are lucky. Its worse when you get stuck with a 5 figure hospital bill and no one to go after.

Now if they only made more selection of cameras that can have the battery life that last for a ride.
 

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For what you want to do you need one front AND back. If you are hit from behind front facing will not help you and if hit from the front a rear facing won't help either. Sure either one, might catch a plate but it is not a given.
 

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However I would agree with the helmet cam comment. Of course your neck has to support the weight. For me that would be a problem but I am not going to get a camera anyway.
My Sony HDR-AS100V weighs 3.25 ounces with the battery inserted. You can't even feel it.
 
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