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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

If that’s what it looks like, someone took a vintage Bianchi frame and added a CF fork and a very modern electric 1X drivetrain. Interesting project... A little heavy at close to 20lbs. I’m neither shopping or selling, it just came up in my feed and I thought it was kind of cool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
'Specially for a frame that is mid to low level at best.
What do you figure, about 3K invested? Cool enough, but kinda why?


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126 rear spacing per the info would make it vintage by most opinions.


Pro Closet has been called many things but 'low cost' for preowned has never been their gig. It has Bianchi appeal (or Italian appeal), modern drivetrain, carbon wheelset and available today from a credible seller. Some people want a unique look in the bicycle they ride. Their online ads give them a big audience.
 

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126 rear spacing per the info would make it vintage by most opinions.


Pro Closet has been called many things but 'low cost' for preowned has never been their gig. It has Bianchi appeal (or Italian appeal), modern drivetrain, carbon wheelset and available today from a credible seller. Some people want a unique look in the bicycle they ride. Their online ads give them a big audience.
For me "vintage", means a classic, not just something that is old. As in:

Vintage : of old, recognized, and enduring interest, importance, or quality : classic

I brought a Mondonico frame from the Pro's Closet on eBay a few years back for $450 which I thought was a good deal, but then, no one else bid on it
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
For me "vintage", means a classic, not just something that is old. As in:

Vintage : of old, recognized, and enduring interest, importance, or quality : classic

I brought a Mondonico frame from the Pro's Closet on eBay a few years back for $450 which I thought was a good deal, but then, no one else bid on it
Did you build that frame up?


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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
126 rear spacing per the info would make it vintage by most opinions.


Pro Closet has been called many things but 'low cost' for preowned has never been their gig. It has Bianchi appeal (or Italian appeal), modern drivetrain, carbon wheelset and available today from a credible seller. Some people want a unique look in the bicycle they ride. Their online ads give them a big audience.
It’s a good looking build!! I like it anyway…


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For me "vintage", means a classic, not just something that is old. As in:

Vintage : of old, recognized, and enduring interest, importance, or quality : classic

I brought a Mondonico frame from the Pro's Closet on eBay a few years back for $450 which I thought was a good deal

Very nice Mondonico. And my size, too. Lovely.
I would agree about vintage and classic for lightweights (and other categories of bikes). But then there are those who think their old mass produced Trek/etc is classic, and will defend that position vigorously.

I build/buy almost every vintage frame as classic.
Calling vintage frames with new groups 'classic' is a contradiction (to me) in terms. Classic is the sum total of the bike which (to me) means: original paint on f+f, friction 4/5/6sp, level top tube, tubulars, round non-ergo bars, round chainrings.

Other than being produced by Campagnolo and silver, what's classic about Potenza? or a threadless stem with spacers? No question about any Mondonico frame probably being classic.

YMMV

edit: I'm building a 1987 Bianchi Vittoria - had an issue with installing Weinmann delta brakes - so it will get Centaur dual pivot brakes and a Campy 9sp long cage rear der, because I want a 7 speed 32 tooth freewheel. Is it a classic build? = Hardly. :mad: But substantially more practical for my terrain. (y)
 

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Very nice Mondonico. And my size, too. Lovely.
I would agree about vintage and classic for lightweights (and other categories of bikes). But then there are those who think their old mass produced Trek/etc is classic, and will defend that position vigorously.

I build/buy almost every vintage frame as classic.
Calling vintage frames with new groups 'classic' is a contradiction (to me) in terms. Classic is the sum total of the bike which (to me) means: original paint on f+f, friction 4/5/6sp, level top tube, tubulars, round non-ergo bars, round chainrings.

Other than being produced by Campagnolo and silver, what's classic about Potenza? or a threadless stem with spacers? No question about any Mondonico frame probably being classic.

YMMV

edit: I'm building a 1987 Bianchi Vittoria - had an issue with installing Weinmann delta brakes - so it will get Centaur dual pivot brakes and a Campy 9sp long cage rear der, because I want a 7 speed 32 tooth freewheel. Is it a classic build? = Hardly. :mad: But substantially more practical for my terrain. (y)
I am not sure what year the Mondonico is but given the existence of head tube cable stops it was probably built in the modern era of integrated brake/shifters. Being cheap, I wasn't interested in trying to buy an older Campy group. Now it were a 1950's bike, I might go the path of putting on vintage parts.
 
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