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Good starting point: http://www.raydobbins.com/polishing/

Mother's Mag polish works well for aluminum parts, Simichrome or one of the less expensive clones (Maas, Hagerty 100) work well for chrome.

If you want to know more than you ever thought possible about polishing, read this detailed tutorial:
http://www.vintagebmx.com/community/index.php?showtopic=4005471

I buy my wheels and compounds from these folks:
http://www.caswellplating.com/buffs/buffman.htm

I've also found that a Dremel with a brass brush is great for removing rust specks on things like Campagnolo QR's and small nuts on brake calipers.

The Dobbins site tells you what is anodized and what isn't, as far a Campagnolo. I wouldn't remove the anodizing unless it was very scratched to begin with. If you need to remove it, EZ Off oven cleaner is what you want. Not the 'eco-friendly, smells good' stuff, the stuff that contains lye. Any brand will work, lye is the key.

Looking forward to pictures of your finished results!
 

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rcnute said:
How about scratch removal--will a Dremel with some type of wire brush work or do I need a full on bench grinder?
What parts are you talking about? It makes a huge difference. A dremel is handy for hubs, brake calipers and the like. Anything bigger, like a stem, cranks, seatpost, you really need a wheel, or a lot of time.

The only thing I use a Dremel for is rust removal on nuts and QR's. A brass brush is better than steel, it won't scratch. Heavy scratches are best removed with sandpaper before buffing, in my experience. same with heavy rust.

I would never remove anodizing unless the part was trashed badly by scratches. The Dobbins link tells you which Campag parts are anodized and which aren't.

If you don't want to lay out the cash for a buffing setup, which I've found to be extremely useful, plan on spending time and money on piles of sandpaper. 2000 grit wont get you as shiny as rouge on a wheel. You don't need a fancy bench grinder. I use a $30 Lowes/Home Depot bench grinder and the $50 kit from Caswell. For less than $100 I can do everything I need. I've had guys give me Campy SR seat posts that were so trashed they couldn't bear to ask money for them, and have buffed them to mirror finish in short time. Same with Cinelli stems, though they are heavily anodized, and you have to go the lye route to remove it.

Post some pics of what you are doing, and I'm sure we can help you along.
 

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I don't believe Sugino cranks are anodized. With cranks it is usually best to start with sandpaper. Use a grade that is slightly finer than the scratches you are trying to eliminate. You may have to start with a 80 grade and work your way finer, depending on the scratches.

I have polished Dura Ace cranks and other Shimano cranks that were originally anodized. Once they are scratched to a certain point, there really isn't much choice if you want them to look nice. For example here are some 105 cranks that were a mess:


I've found that a coating of good paste wax works well to protect them, but your climate will have a lot to do with that. When I had a bike with polished cranks at my folks near the ocean in S. Ga , they needed a lot of attention. In AZ, not so much. YMMV

Mothers works well to keep them shiny.
 
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