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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to road bikes! Initially I was looking for a decent commuter bike and came across this article about hand built Canadian bikes Maple Leaf Bikes - Canadian Bike Builders - La Bicycletta and I was hooked! I grabbed an old Miele off CL (C$420) Bicycle tire Tire Wheel Bicycle frame Bicycle wheel rim which I'm pretty pleased with. It's full Campy except for the stem/bar/brake levers, i'm just about to grab new wheels and tires, I need to make the gearing a little more hill friendly, and I might switch to integrated shifters. Really I want it to ride like a modern rig but have a bit of class as well. Silly I know… I'm having my LBS build the wheels on the old campy hubs and am not sure how to proceed otherwise. I just saw this Vintage Mens' Garlatti Racing Road Bike, Campagnolo(Italy) on CL and was wondering if it's worth grabbing bikes like this to get the old camagnolo parts or if they're pretty common stuff. I look forward to your constructive input!

Cheers!
 

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It's a beauty. Getting it on the road would be sweet.

I worry, though, that for each thing you try to upgrade (you mention gearing and shifters) you are going to get caught in an old/new compatibility problem. Sometimes its hard to upgrade one item without almost stripping the bike down to the frame and starting over. Before you change anything, I suggest you research the possibilities and plan your final result.
 

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My advice would be to clean it up, replace nothing but tires and brake pads, overhaul, lube and adjust, and just ride it. Upgrading parts is a money pit. You will quickly spend more money than the bike is worth.

Is there something seriously wrong with the rims? If not, I can't imagine why it would make sense to re-build the wheels. True them up if necessary, and ride.

I assume that's a freewheel rather than a freehub (how many cogs?). If so, switching to integrated shifters would mean buying a new rear hub in addition to cassette, derailleurs, shifters, chain, maybe more. Too much $, IMHO.

The easiest way to get lower gearing is a new freewheel.

My advice: clean it up, ride it, enjoy it.
 

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Agree fully with j and Bob, new tires and brake pads, and ride the bike. If you want to get a 13-28 freewheel, it'll give you two easier gears, but will probably take a longer cage derailleur. The wheel rims look fine. Campy bearings last forever. Grease 'em up, and they're good to go. Even the saddle looks like its got a few more miles left on it.

The crank looks like Campagnolo Victory, a more affordable group in the Campy line. Super Record was the top, then Victory. At this point, there would be no significant performance difference between the two.

Nice bike.

The Garlatti is not bad. Builder chromed the stays and lugs and put Campy on it. But t's at least 10 years older than the Miele and the components wouldn't add anything to the Miele, if they were compatible. It's probably not worth $500 to anyone other than an eccentric collector who wants to ride a bike nobody's heard of. Headset, stem, brakes, brake levers, crank, might be recreational Campy, but not in the same league as Victory.
 

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In the Toronto area Mieles were and still are pretty common. Jim Miele had a place in the GTA (Mississauga?) building up frames and complete bikes.

I had a brand new "Road Issue" in 1991 with all 105. 7-speed indexed shifting.

They went out of business in the '90's.

I imagine the OP's is earlier - mid-80's?. The Victory crankset was available with a wide variety of rings, was marketed as a "touring" crankset. An early version of a compact.

I'm agreeing with all the others - just fix it up as is.

ps found a mid-80's catalog scan. Complete with a "Victory" model. Have fun CATALOGUE - 198? MILEL SALES BROCHURE
 

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One more for fixing it up and riding it, instead of "modernizing"; that's expensive, and besides, if one wants a modern ride, it's likely cheaper to just buy a new bike. A nice vintage bicycle should be like a nice vintage car, or electric guitar--preserved for its own sake. One wouldn't "update" a '57 Chevy, or a '54 goldtop, would one?
 

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Did a bit more research on the Victory group to refresh my memory.

It first appears in the 1985 catalog, as a second tier group under Record and followed by Triomphe. Both Victory and Triomphe also came in "leisure" versions with lower gearing and medium cage RD's.

Initially the shifters were plain friction. If the bike has Syncro (indexed) shifters then that dates it a little later - circa 1987.

BCD of the crankset is 116 mm - another Campy special, meaning NOS chainrings are going to be a rare item.

Miele frames came in the usual range of quality/price, with the tubing set indicated by a sticker. Mine lasted a long time as a winter beater, I finally passed it on to a son who had it stolen.

The company was active from 1982 to 1996.
 

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I have 4 steel bikes with Campy downtube friction and indexed shifting. That's a cool looking bike and you should be able to enjoy it as is without too many tweaks. Good idea to redo the wheels. That is most likely a 126 mm spaced frame on the rear dropouts meaning you should be able to put up to a 7 speed freewheel without problems, although some frames, 7 speed is pushing it, depending on the freewheel. As noted above the Victory crank, while not the top end, could carry the equivalent of compact chainrings.

Put a modern 8 speed chain on it. I use KMC z-72 on mine, but SRAM chains are good too. That will make the shifting a little smoother. Indexed shifting can be a challenge in this era, and adding brifters will also generally be a big project. I would suggest trying out friction shifting first and then doing research and maybe assembling parts if you want to go that route. It could potentially turn expensive.

Enjoy the bike, steel bikes are cool, and pink steel bikes even cooler!
 

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Those rims may run tubulars, so that might be the reason the OP wants to swap them out. That and the other mods he wants to make will turn it into an C$800 bike, putting him close to a 105-equipped bike territory.
 

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It's full Campy except for the stem/bar/brake levers,
Campy didn't make bars or stems. What brand of brake levers are they?

Per others' comments, just ride the thing. I'm guessing the bike had tubulars and thus the need for new rims but otherwise you're going down a rabbit hole trying to "modernize" such a bike. Not only will it be an endless money pit, the final product may not run as well as the current bike.
 

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i'm just about to grab new wheels
i always use sun m13ii rims and sapim race spokes -- a great value if you run narrow tires.

I need to make the gearing a little more hill friendly
a new sunrace 14-28t freewheel is under $20 on ebay. ird freewheels are a little harder to find and a lot more expensive, but i think they're worth it. or you could go nos suntour or whatever.

I'm having my LBS build the wheels on the old campy hubs
great idea, but it's also easy to build em yourself using sheldon's wheel building page as a guide and your upside-down frame as a truing stand.

and reroute that front brake cable over the stem and bars!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I will take the general advice and just get it rolling. Fast Ferd- Correct the rims are for tubular tires, which I'm told are not very flat repair friendly so new wheels and tires were an easy choice. It is a freewheel hub so yes I will try and get a new 7-speed on there. Bikerjulio- Very cool catalogue excerpt thanks for that! I guess mine is the "Triomphe" model? One more question. It had no pedals when I got it so I've just thrown some randoms on there and it would be nice to get some that may have been original… Suggestions? Most my parts say "Campagnolo Record" on them. Does record=Victory? Should I just hunt on CL for them?

Thanks again all! Great info!
 

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you might want to go with a 6-speed freewheel instead a 7-speed. more is not always better. if the 7 is wider, the wheel will need to be dished even more, which will put even more stress on the axle. you also might need to run a 9-speed chain with a 7-speed freewheel to ensure smooth shifting. an 8-speed chain will work great with 6-speeds.

vintage campy pedals are great if you have $50-$100 burning a hole in your pocket. if you want a knockoff, i prefer kkt top-run pedals from the '80s. they're comfy and look the part. i always overhaul them. the record knockoff from kkt was called the pro-ace, but it usually has a strap loop (like record stada pedals) that hurt my feet. another idea is to go vintage campy chorus if you have the bucks. or if you just want good, new platforms, shop for mks sylvans. there are several sylvan models. add christophe clips and leather binda straps for the win!
 

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I will take the general advice and just get it rolling. Fast Ferd- Correct the rims are for tubular tires, which I'm told are not very flat repair friendly so new wheels and tires were an easy choice. It is a freewheel hub so yes I will try and get a new 7-speed on there. Bikerjulio- Very cool catalogue excerpt thanks for that! I guess mine is the "Triomphe" model? One more question. It had no pedals when I got it so I've just thrown some randoms on there and it would be nice to get some that may have been original… Suggestions? Most my parts say "Campagnolo Record" on them. Does record=Victory? Should I just hunt on CL for them?

Thanks again all! Great info!
Yours may well be the Triomphe model. A better picture of the crank will confirm. I'm finding 1987 as the last year for Triomphe.

Also a pic of the RD will help. A screened logo indicates 1987 or later.

At this time Campy had introduced several new groups ahead of Victory and Triomphe, which were being phased out.

So in this 1987-88 period there was:

Record
Croce-d'aune
Chorus
Athena
Victory
Triomphe

The pedals of this time are a beautiful design, especially the Record and Chorus versions

Iron Metal Machine Steel Silver
 

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I have 4 steel bikes with Campy downtube friction and indexed shifting. That's a cool looking bike and you should be able to enjoy it as is without too many tweaks. Good idea to redo the wheels. That is most likely a 126 mm spaced frame on the rear dropouts meaning you should be able to put up to a 7 speed freewheel without problems, although some frames, 7 speed is pushing it, depending on the freewheel. As noted above the Victory crank, while not the top end, could carry the equivalent of compact chainrings.

Put a modern 8 speed chain on it. I use KMC z-72 on mine, but SRAM chains are good too. That will make the shifting a little smoother. Indexed shifting can be a challenge in this era, and adding brifters will also generally be a big project. I would suggest trying out friction shifting first and then doing research and maybe assembling parts if you want to go that route. It could potentially turn expensive.

Enjoy the bike, steel bikes are cool, and pink steel bikes even cooler!

If you keep the friction shifting
Yes, friction shifting is easily doable with only 6 cogs in back. Or maybe "ultra 7 speed" freewheels Suntour made and are still out there. They were designed to fit in the same space as a 6 speed, although the chain might rub on the dropout when on the last cog out, as mine did. So I went back to 6 speed freewheels on my two steeds.

OP, nothing "wrong" with down tube friction shifting. The cables are short, giving nice crisp shifting. When one frays, it can be easily detected by eye and replaced in a few minutes with no hassles. The levers have no detents to wear out, so they last forever. I'm still riding two bikes with the old Campy friction shifters. I bought an extra set 20 years ago, just in case, and never had to use them. The originals have lasted 70,000 miles on two bikes and they keep right on going. Just unscrew the wing nut and clean 'em up every few thousand miles. The bushings pick up road grime and get "sticky." That's it. Brake lever shifters are a maintenance nightmare in comparison.

A classic bike with good components should actually increase in value if preserved in its original state. Collectors will pay more for a period correct vintage bike than a frankenbike upgraded with modern components. Campy lasts forever. What more is there to say?

Grease it up and go! Looking at saddle height, handlebar drop, its going to fit as designed. :thumbsup:
 

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i always use sun m13ii rims and sapim race spokes -- a great value if you run narrow tires.



a new sunrace 14-28t freewheel is under $20 on ebay. ird freewheels are a little harder to find and a lot more expensive, but i think they're worth it. or you could go nos suntour or whatever.



great idea, but it's also easy to build em yourself using sheldon's wheel building page as a guide and your upside-down frame as a truing stand.

and reroute that front brake cable over the stem and bars!
Good advice!

OP, back in the days of standard 32 or 36 spoking, we'd replace the rims one or two times on the same hubs. The rims always got beat up. The cup and cone hub bearings lasted much longer. We could re-spoke a new rim on an old hub in about a half hour. This is an art lost on the younger generation, but is easy to do.

I had a pair of those exact rims, Mavic, right? I got tired of tubular costs and repairs, so put on clincher rims. They fit the same spokes! Not recommended, but I've gotten away with it several times with no spokes breaking later. Go with the shop mech's recommendation. Definitely keep those stellar hubs. I'm still on all my original Record hubs going back to the mid 80s. Overhauled a set a few years ago. After 60,000 miles, they were still smooth as silk.
 

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I built several 7 speed freewheel wheels in the 1980's. It is tedious, since the drive side spokes end up being much tighter than non drive. 6 speeds are much easier.
 

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I built several 7 speed freewheel wheels in the 1980's. It is tedious, since the drive side spokes end up being much tighter than non drive. 6 speeds are much easier.
6 speed also works better with friction shifting, IME. Easier to hear and feel the chain when it drop onto the cog and fine tune positioning. Suntour Ultra 7s used to fit on standard 6 speed hubs, but the last cog out was awfully close to the dropout and rubbed if everything wasn't perfect. If bike has 6 speeds, I'd stay with it.
 

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You said that you were "looking for a decent commuter bike ". I hope that you don't plan to use this as that bike. What you have is a surviving high-end bike from a period now gone. You would quickly ruin what value this bike has by riding it in bad weather and locking it up outside. These bikes were NEVER intended to stand up to daily commuting. You should change as little as possible on this bike and keep it indoors, saving it for good weather road rides only. Commuting daily on this bike would be a sacrilege.

What you have now will be a collector's item in just a few years IF you don't mess around with it and if you keep it preserved. If you use it for commuting, what you will have in just a year or 2 will be a pile of used parts on a ruined frame.
 
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