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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did 60 miles in the pouring rain on Sunday after I fitted these tyres (not pro, juts the rigid version which costs much less) to try and although they are a very comfortable soft ride has anyone noticed how dangerous they are in the wet? I nearly came off at pretty low speeds on most roundabouts as the rear kept slipping out all the time catching me unawares! Maybe I'm comparing them to my previous GP3000's I had previously which are twice as expensive, but I wouldn't expect half as much grip just because they are half the price?
 

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It depends. 25 miles in a straight line isn't going to do much to help grip for hard cornering.

I try to be careful for the first few rides, particularly if it's wet.

I don't recall my Rubinos being noticably worse for grip than the Conti Ultra Gatorskins I'm using at the moment.
 

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Resident Dutchbag
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Rubinos are far less grippy than GP3000's and wet conditions don't make things any better. You can rub new tyres down with some citrus based degreaser to get rid of the newness a bit but that will only help, well, a bit. The Rubinos are great training tyres when speedy cornering in the wet isn't that important, they are pretty much bomb proof and loooong lasting as well. Definitley not a racing tyre, but you can't really expect that for the money.
 

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Tires like the rubino usually use a harder more duarble rubber compound. Wet conering is not a strong point of tires like that. Especially if your used to a higher end tire like the gp3000. when it rains just slow things down and take it easy, also I have found that it takes about 50-100 miles to rid new tires of there newness, the rain speeds up the process so you should be good to go now.
 

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pinoy thunder
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The Rubino Pro Slicks that are on my training wheels (2000 mi. so far) have actually been good in the wet. The rubber compound is soft to the touch, unlike the regular Rubino Pros. I am not sure if the rubber compound of either tires are the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
It might be the release agent i guess. I must admit that for the super cheap price they are a really good tyre and for my 25 mile to and from work commute along cycle tracks everyday I find them super comfortable compared to GP3000's i'm used to and only seem to loose a bit of responsiveness which is great. With thicker sidewalls and better puncture resistance than the GP3000's i'm gonna stick with them. Just hope it doesn't rain too much that's all : )
 

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I registered to reply to this thread. I think they're excellent in the wet. Like everyone has said you need to scrub any tyre in a bit before they're good in the wet. It doesn't matter if your tyre is on a bicycle or a race car the surface works best when it's a bit rough.
As far as these particular tyres go they're good once they have wear on them. I would forget about comparing ultimate grip especially if you're just using them for the road/training. Some road surfaces are shiny and worn and will never give good grip. All surfaces have varying grip how are you going to compare them? You should be more concerned about how easy they are to handle near the limit and if you run these scrubbed at the right pressures they're fantastic. I am light (58kg) and run them at 5/7bar f/r. If you want to make it even easier to handle run the front at as little as 4bar (60psi) but at this pressure you lose grip a little even if it's easier to ride. You need to keep them within about 2 bar so the effect of moving your weight front to rear will affect the relative grip.
At the moment my bike is ace with these and it has lots of rubber on the front and the rear is not far from the internal thread wear-wise.
 

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A wheelist
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If you suspect the release agent then wipe them down with isopropyl alcohol. Also, take the shine off them with 80 grit sand paper. I kid you not. Don't worry; you're not taking years off their life. On our 50 degree steep indoor board velodrome, unsanded tires would slide off the track in the first corner.
 

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It unusual for the rear tyre to slip. Much more likely that front tyre goes first.
The reason for this is because it's being pushed and turned at the same time.
Also most of weight is on the rear tyre, which helps to keep it planted.
 

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Here's an good explanation from 4 experts on the variables important in wet bicycle tire traction. Consider their advice for achieving better traction under wet conditions.

Follow the clean 'em approach recommended above. In addition, at 60 tpi, your tires are pretty stiff, which is a disadvantage in wet slippery conditions. Also check inflation - your rear may be more prone to slip if the inflation is notably higher than the front - and consider dropping it a bit for wet conditions.
 

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I think the real question at this point is has the answer changed in 9 years of production. It being a zombie thread.

BUT, considering I just bought 2 Slick Rubino Pro, timely perhaps. ;)

I already have a 25C set of folding Rubino pros, the models with the tread on them. Got them quite a while back. I have been in dry turns hard into them and lost my line early on in use. Maybe they were still too new. My GP4 never have done this to me.


I paid 19.00 each for the 26C threaded ones, I had not much used since the above situation. And 23C Slicks the just got here the other day for 20.00 ea. I need to spend more time on them all I guess. I will say that if/when I use a 23C over a 25C I am all in, and that is when I need the most grip.
 
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