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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought myself a road bike, and I am a Clyde. The bike I bought has theses tires on it, and they are gray in color. After doing some research, I found that at my weight (245), I really need to be on something like a 25. These Tricomps are 23C.

By the way, what does the C mean behind 700?

I have not even ridden the bike, and the tires look to be in great shape. However, I have no idea how to measure the wear. I will probably stick them on ebay, and try to move them so I can put the money towards getting some Continental Gatorskins in 25. I just don't know what to ask for them or if they even have any value. They look to be pretty expensive new.

I've been MTB'g for years, but I'm just getting into road riding and trying to learn all I can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm concerned about flats. I don't exactly have smooth pavement to ride on. Most of the roads I'll be on are a mix between old slag roads with occasional potholes and the cement from the drive around my work. There are some places of loose gravel as well. I will avoid as much as possible and try to stay on the smooth stuff, but I don't want my tires to become an issue. Flats are not something I really want to deal with either, because most of my riding will be around my work during my lunch break. I will be traveling away from my work in my alotted lunch time and don't want to end up stranded an late getting back.
 

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Hard to imagine someone selling a used bike and not keeping those tires for themself if they were hardly worn....but if that's the case you'll want to take really good/clear pictures proving it to get any meaningful amount for them.
They are very good tires....but used tires from a stanger on the internet is a tough sell. Wouldn't want to guess a price. I'd probably pay $40 a pari is I had 100% proof they were in great shape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hard to imagine someone selling a used bike and not keeping those tires for themself if they were hardly worn....but if that's the case you'll want to take really good/clear pictures proving it to get any meaningful amount for them.They are very good tires....but used tires from a stanger on the internet is a tough sell. Wouldn't want to guess a price. I'd probably pay $40 a pari is I had 100% proof they were in great shape.
Ok. They are definitely not new. They are just not worn out. I suspect they have a few rides on them. I go to pick up the bike tomorrow, and I will be stripping it down to check everything out. I will get a better look a tthe tires then, and decide what to do.
 

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just to save you the time from putting them on ebay.......the online retailers have them at $32 a piece.
 

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I just bought myself a road bike, and I am a Clyde. The bike I bought has theses tires on it, and they are gray in color. After doing some research, I found that at my weight (245), I really need to be on something like a 25. These Tricomps are 23C.

By the way, what does the C mean behind 700?

I have not even ridden the bike, and the tires look to be in great shape. However, I have no idea how to measure the wear. I will probably stick them on ebay, and try to move them so I can put the money towards getting some Continental Gatorskins in 25. I just don't know what to ask for them or if they even have any value. They look to be pretty expensive new.
You can determine how worn they are by weighing them. The front tire probably has zero wear on it (unless it was ridden as a rear) and so that can be your reference weight (or you could look up the advertised weight). A completely worn out tire usually is about 15% lighter than a new tire.

The C after 700 is a size designation. Just like the B in 650B. You can learn all there is to know at Tire Sizing Systems
 

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You can determine how worn they are by weighing them. The front tire probably has zero wear on it (unless it was ridden as a rear) and so that can be your reference weight (or you could look up the advertised weight). A completely worn out tire usually is about 15% lighter than a new tire.

The C after 700 is a size designation. Just like the B in 650B. You can learn all there is to know at Tire Sizing Systems
-I wouldn't use that method. He doesn't know if the previous owner rotated the tires or not and it's not like all tires come in at the same weight. And "advertised weight" is pretty much a joke in the bike tire industry.
 

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I would just buy a 25 rear and use the 23s on the front. The front carries less weight and hardly flats. Contrary to what you see on the forums, you can mix and match tire brands. :eek:

More than you ever wanted to know about tire measurements:

Tire Sizing Systems
 

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-I wouldn't use that method. He doesn't know if the previous owner rotated the tires or not and it's not like all tires come in at the same weight. And "advertised weight" is pretty much a joke in the bike tire industry.
Actually for Continental, Vredestein and a couple of other brands I have found consistency with both tire to tire and advertised weights. The odds are good that the OP would not experience a front tire that had been run on the rear. And worst comes to worst and the OP underestimates the amount of wear, so what?
 
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