Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

· Cannot bench own weight
Joined
·
4,298 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure where to start this post, as I have only a rudimentary understanding of the metrics that make for a good cyclist.

One of those metrics is watts per kg, and I believe that 5w/kg is a desirable number to have. In fact it might be a pipe dream for the vast majority of us. Maybe 4w/kg is a more realistic number to shoot for.

I also know that the number doesn't mean anything unless you can do it for a certain period of time. I don't know what this period is called, or how long it should be. I'd guess an hour. Seems like I've read that before.

I bring all this up because I want to set some medium term goals for myself (up to 18 months). One of these goals is to do the Mt Washington Hill Climb in August 2009. I'm completely unsure of what sort of target I should be looking at for that ride. I live in Ohio, and we have absolutely no hills of any significant length. We have plenty of hills that are really steep, but nothing over half mile long.

So I figure if I can target this w/kg metric, then perhaps I can better estimate what a goal target would be. (with the help of analytic cycling).

I have a goal weight of 160 lb (72.6kg), which means to hit 4w/kg I need 290w for whatever period of time (say an hour).

Any thoughts you could share? I'm still a good distance from the weight goal, but making progress. I firmly believe I can make it with plenty of time to spare.
 

· NeoRetroGrouch
Joined
·
6,493 Posts
Einstruzende said:
Not sure where to start this post, as I have only a rudimentary understanding of the metrics that make for a good cyclist.

One of those metrics is watts per kg, and I believe that 5w/kg is a desirable number to have. In fact it might be a pipe dream for the vast majority of us. Maybe 4w/kg is a more realistic number to shoot for.

I also know that the number doesn't mean anything unless you can do it for a certain period of time. I don't know what this period is called, or how long it should be. I'd guess an hour. Seems like I've read that before.

I bring all this up because I want to set some medium term goals for myself (up to 18 months). One of these goals is to do the Mt Washington Hill Climb in August 2009. I'm completely unsure of what sort of target I should be looking at for that ride. I live in Ohio, and we have absolutely no hills of any significant length. We have plenty of hills that are really steep, but nothing over half mile long.

So I figure if I can target this w/kg metric, then perhaps I can better estimate what a goal target would be. (with the help of analytic cycling).

I have a goal weight of 160 lb (72.6kg), which means to hit 4w/kg I need 290w for whatever period of time (say an hour).

Any thoughts you could share? I'm still a good distance from the weight goal, but making progress. I firmly believe I can make it with plenty of time to spare.
Get this book. http://www.peakscoachinggroup.com/products/Train_with_power_book.html

I assume you have a power meter if you metric is going to be power.

What is you current maximum power for 1 hour? (Called Functional Threashold Power or FTP in the book above.) You are (probably) correct in assuming that this is the 'system' that you want to train for a hill climb. Do a search on Sweet Spot Training or SST.

I do not know what a 'respectable' number would me for Mt. Washington.

TF
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,358 Posts
You can take the published times for previous races, run analytic cycling against that to see what sort of power you'd need at various weights to meet them.

I second getting "the" book if you have a PM or are thinking of getting one (or getting coached).

You can also test your climbing speed on times test climbs.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top