The updated KICKR is capable of simulating gradients as high as 20 percent, and can produce a leg-shattering 2000 watts of resistance.

The updated KICKR is capable of simulating gradients as high as 20 percent, and can produce a leg-shattering 2000 watts of resistance.​

Riding indoors will never be as good as being outside. But if you must suffer through trainer sessions, Wahoo's recently revised KICKR smart trainer is not a bad way to go. Highlights include a new ergonomic design, quieter operation, and enhanced ride feel.

The new KICKR is claimed to be 14% quieter than the previous iteration, measuring 61 decibels. Additionally, Wahoo says it has reduced specific noise frequencies, making for a quieter indoor riding experience.

Team Sky and 2016 Tour de France champ Chris Froome warming up on the Wahoo KICKR smart trainer.

Team Sky and 2016 Tour de France champ Chris Froome warming up on the Wahoo KICKR smart trainer.​

Propulsion by high-inertia flywheel carries over, which allows the KICKR to provide a more realistic ride feel. The new KICKR also employs updated physics models and algorithms to create a more responsive indoor trainer that can translate grade and elevation data into realistic resistance.

The updated KICKR is capable of simulating gradients as high as 20 percent, and can produce a leg-shattering 2000 watts of resistance.

The KICKR utilizes a sturdy steel construction that includes a redesigned handle for easier carrying.

The KICKR utilizes a sturdy steel construction that includes a redesigned handle for easier carrying.​

Wahoo also updated the connection and pairing process with convenient status LEDs. Additionally, ANT FE-C+ compatibility was added, increasing the number of third party devices it will interface with.

Wheel size compatibility runs 24-29 inches without the need for a wheel block, and the KICKR utilizes a sturdy steel construction that includes a redesigned handle for easier carrying. Claimed weight is 49 pounds. Price is $1199, which includes a cassette and Wahoo's RPM cadence sensor. Check out the video below to learn more.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Hx2PKN40c8

For more information please visit www.wahoofitness.com.