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You ever have second thoughts about leaving your s-works venge outside when going into say your local trader joes, whole foods, albertsons, etc. to get a enrgy bar, drink, etc.?

This one time on a double century I did make a stop at a grocery store. Didnt have a problem. Brang the bike inside, paid for stuff and that was that. And I thought why not...shopping carts are a lot more dirty than my thin 23mm tires right? Seems like any store that allows shopping carts should allow bicycles to be walked in stores.

You guye ever do this? Is it common in Europe or America?

But wha5 do you guys think...is it rude to walk a bicycle into stores?
 

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...why not...shopping carts are a lot more dirty than my thin 23mm tires right?

You guye ever do this?

Is it common in Europe or America?

But wha5 do you guys think...is it rude to walk a bicycle into stores?
Interesting idea comparing shopping cart dirt to bicycle dirt... I never thought of that.

One coffee (and donut) shop I stop at from time-to-time didn't have a suitable place to park or lock my bicycle up at. So I asked the manager if there was a good place that I might have over-looked.

He said I could bring my bike into the entry (an air lock like area) and park it there. It wasn't long after that they put a proper bike stand in front of the store... very close to the front door and the stores windows. I can now keep an eye on the bicycle while I drink a warm-up coffee.

This one permissioned coffee shop was the only place I've ever taken my bicycle into.

A near-by Starbucks has a sign out front that says "no bicycles on the sidewalk area"... now. That sign didn't used to be there. I get the impression that the city didn't like bicycles cluttering up the sidewalks (there is also an ice cream shop there). But they did set up bicycle parking at the bus stop in the same area... and it's nice.

I have every park with a restroom or water fountain in the area memorized. All the parks seem to have places to lock up my bicycle. Sometimes I stop at a gas station or fast food place to get a vitamin water or use the restroom.

I never leave my bicycle unlocked. Even though the cable lock I carry is a cheapie I feel its good enough to stop an opportunist from hopping on my bike and riding away.

Unless I park my bicycle at a designated bike rack... I always ask if where I chained my bicycle up at is OK. Often I have got yeah... that's OK... but some other people prefer over there.

I think it might be rude to just roll in the bicycle without asking permission.
 

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Cranky Old Bastard
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Funny that this came up.

I always shop at one particular grocery store because they don't hassle me when I park my bike inside.

It is one of those huge chain stores with a deli/cafe just to the right of the doors. I have to walk around a long display area but then go between the tables and chairs and lean it against the wall. It helps that that area is never busy or crowded.

I've never asked anyone, I just walk in like it is perfectly normal.
But I always ask the woman at the counter to keep an eye on my bike, thanks.
Edit: I guess it is rude not to ask for permission but I look at it like if you ask, you give them a chance to say no.

There are a lot of bike thefts in this area. If they did have a rack (which they don't) it wouldn't be visible from inside the store and I wouldn't use it.
So if they do get a rack they'll lose most of my business; if I have to drive I may as well hit the cheaper stores across town.
 

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.... I guess it is rude not to ask but I look at it like if you ask you give them a chance to say no.
Good point. I like that. Might be better to just politely apologize if management complains.
 

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Good point. I like that. Might be better to just politely apologize if management complains.
... true. I'm a photographer and when out and about with a cammie in this day and age, it's better from my POV to beg forgiveness rather than ask permission (I prefer candid in the moment shots of people, places and things)...

Course, we live in a free society that loves to say no (mostly because a generation has grown up programmed to only accept a very narror parameter of free)... sigh. Guess it's time to test how far I can get into Kohls.
 

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I just do it. They're usually too flabbergasted by my outrageous roadie attire to say anything. I can't remember the last time anybody objected. Oh wait...it was at a Taco Bell in Reno 15 years ago...anyway, better to seek forgiveness than ask for permission.
 

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Normally, I would agree that forgiveness is better than permission, but I think in this case it plays into the negative stereotype that some folks have about cyclists.

Personally, I think its better to ask first. If the answer is "no", exercise your right to take your business elsewhere. JMHO.
 

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And I thought why not...shopping carts are a lot more dirty than my thin 23mm tires right? Seems like any store that allows shopping carts should allow bicycles to be walked in stores.
For that matter, the bottoms of people's shoes track a lot more dirt into a store than shopping cart wheels or bicycle tires ever could. But to those who object vehemently to having a bicycle in the store, logic doesn't matter. Often, their perception of a bicycle and anything connected with it (filthy, oily, greasy, ridden only by children, adult indigents or adult weirdos) makes them say "no" if you'd ask them. Nothing you can do about that.
 

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I think people are becoming more accustomed to bikes and are more inclined to make allowances for them.

I asked my gym about a place to put my bike before I would sign up. They made a place for me to keep it, and now, on the weekends, there are about 3 or 4 road bikes there. I have a doctor who insists I bring my bike in when I see him. A surf shop that does the same. There is a small hotel in Key West where we are known as "the bike couple". The first time there, the bikes were a problem, but now they have a place downstairs for the them and send emails when they have a couple of days open (at the locals rate!)

I have a network of "cycling friendly" places. Grocery and convenience stores where I can bring a bike in and refuel or hit the head. A bar that will fill my bottles with ice and water. More stores and restaurants seem to be tolerant if not welcoming.
 

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I've taken my bike inside at the optomistrist in the NYC Chinatown many times... and taken my shoes off as well.

Not for Asian customs... but it's easier to walk.
 

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Normally, I would agree that forgiveness is better than permission, but I think in this case it plays into the negative stereotype that some folks have about cyclists.

Personally, I think its better to ask first. If the answer is "no", exercise your right to take your business elsewhere. JMHO.
This. You have to ask first.
 

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Here's the funny thing...my experience has been that people tend to like me more when I'm off the bike. They think we are cool, green minded, socially conscious, friendly, and quirky. We look like superheros in our tight and bright clothing, and go clomping around in our shoes and walking like we are wearing heels. But when on the bike, we are a nuisance.

I can't recall ever having an issue bringing my bike inside a place but I also don't bring it into places where it doesn't seem to belong - like a small place. Most of the time I leave it outside though.
 

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In the summer I can access enough park district restrooms and drinking fountains on my routes that I don't need to go into a private business. But when I use these facilities I'm still leaving my $4-figure bike unattended for those couple of minutes (I've never tried to get the bike into the porta-potty with me).

When the parks lock up I have to use gas stations and I always walk in with my bike and a big smile on my face. I leave the bike by the restroom when using the facilities and then spend a few bucks for the privilege. No one has ever told me not to bring the bike in.

It's like Looigi said, I think the staff has to recover from the sight of me before they realize I've got a bike in their store.
 

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My bike always goes inside with me if I stop to buy something during a ride ... the only time it doesn't is if I'm with others who can watch it while I'm in the store.

The way I see it ... if they are more worried about a bike in their store than making a sale, they don't need my business. I will also stop shopping there in the future for any reason until their policy changes. There are a lot of other stores that don't mind and can use my business.
 

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I am a store manager for a large retailer and a cyclists, so I try to balance both. On numerous occasions I have asked cyclists to move their bike or leave. First it depends on where it is placed, I get some fools who put it against a display up front. Hint to those who don't understand but front displays are high traffic and high turn merchandise. Second issue isn't cleanliness for me or any other manager I know is rules with regard to the Americans with Disabilities Act, we are required to have so much clearance between displays and certain areas, a bicycle may interfere with this and we have to comply with the law. The government takes these complaints very seriously and investigates most, customers will complain very quickly with date and time, investigators will review our video to check compliance. So usually the "no bikes on sidewalk" is not an unfriendly cyclist community, but a legal requirement.

The next hard part of this is the cyclists attitude. If you try to ignore or get aggressive you will leave the bike outside. As with anything if you a more wiling to work with someone they may work with you. If you are quick I may have another place to put it, if longer you can maybe put in a place off the sales floor, for example if a person is waiting for an RX I may offer a storage room that is locked and will allow them to use. But don't try the ask forgiveness later, this is why many people despise cyclists is that attitude, we all need to work together.
 

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My bike always goes inside with me if I stop to buy something during a ride ... the only time it doesn't is if I'm with others who can watch it while I'm in the store.

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^^^^ This

After having my bike stolen from my garage in broad daylight when I was inside the house 10 feet away there is no way I will leave my several thousand dollar bike unattended any more.

I've realized that I was very naive when I used to ask myself the question "who would do that?".

"Who would take my bike from my front porch when the door is open and I've run in to grab my phone?"
"Who would take my bike from the bike rack in my truck bed while I'm inside the convenience store grabbing a soda?"
"Who would take my bike leaning against the wall next to the front door of the market while I'm inside at the counter 5 feet away?"

You'd frankly be surprised. I was. There are people out there who obviously don't think with the same logic as most of us. They'll strike like a cobra given even the tiniest opportunity.

If I have to leave my bike unattended for some reason (e.g. a porta potty where I can't bring the bike inside) I try to tilt the odds in my favor. I'll loop my helmet through the front wheel or put a small lock through the chain ring. Thieves are counting on the ability to quickly ride away on the bike. If that gets tripped up they'll cut their losses. Most thieves cut the lock and ride off. They don't cut the lock and throw the bike in a car. If they can't ride off quickly it's a much less inviting target.
 

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If you start bringing your bike into stores expect to get read the riot act or get a lecture from some manager or even customers. Most people would not mind but there are always some people who have to gripe about something and will look to confront you.

I have a thin, steel cable and key lock that I use to secure my bike to any fixed object, outside, when I go into a store. And, I never leave the bike unattended for more than a few minutes. Most people will not have a cable cutter with them to take the bike if they have bad intentions.

Just to give you an idea of how intolerant people are today, take a look at Youtube and the endless videos of confrontations between store owners/adults, and teen skateboarders. They chase them out of parking lots all the time when the kids are not harming anyone.
 

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It is one of those huge chain stores with a deli/cafe just to the right of the doors. I have to walk around a long display area but then go between the tables and chairs and lean it against the wall. It helps that that area is never busy or crowded.

I've never asked anyone, I just walk in like it is perfectly normal.
But I always ask the woman at the counter to keep an eye on my bike, thanks.
Edit: I guess it is rude not to ask for permission but I look at it like if you ask, you give them a chance to say no.
Let me add that I'm not trying to be a jerk here. My bike is completely out of the way; you can't even see it unless you walk back into the cafe area. It doesn't cause any problem for anyone in any way.
But if I asked permission, I believe that 99% of the time I'd get an automatic no. And I couldn't argue that response because if they "officially" let me do it they'd have to let everyone do it.

I've done this maybe a dozen times, less than once a week last summer, and I think it is just a matter of time before they tell me to stop. I expect that others will see me and want to bring their bikes inside as well and that will end it for everyone.

But I'm already thinking that if I talk with the manager, point out the $$$ value of the bike and that they don't have a rack, he may let me park it somewhere in the back (warehouse area) of the store. Worth a try!
 

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If you start bringing your bike into stores expect to get read the riot act or get a lecture from some manager or even customers. Most people would not mind but there are always some people who have to gripe about something and will look to confront you.
As a prior poster mentioned, that's fine...I'll do my business elsewhere in the future.

I have a thin, steel cable and key lock that I use to secure my bike to any fixed object, outside, when I go into a store. And, I never leave the bike unattended for more than a few minutes. Most people will not have a cable cutter with them to take the bike if they have bad intentions.
I think you'd be surprised...thieves are always on the lookout and they are always ready to seize the opportunity. See my comments about "who would do that". It doesn't make sense to you but then you don't think like a thief.

Just to give you an idea of how intolerant people are today, take a look at Youtube and the endless videos of confrontations between store owners/adults, and teen skateboarders. They chase them out of parking lots all the time when the kids are not harming anyone.
I was a skateboarder and used to have a sticker on my truck "Skateboarding is not a crime." However, you are comparing two completely different things. Skateboarders can damage property doing rail slides and other tricks. They also can injure passersby if they lose control of their board trying to land a trick and they would tend to "scare away customers" if they are doing this right in front of the doorway, which is often the case. Even allowing them in your parking lot can be a serious liablity issue..because if they hurt themselves on your property they'll be coming back with a lawyer looking for someone to pay.

So, yeah...big difference between a skateboarder loitering outside a store and a cyclist bringing their bike in while they are SHOPPING in that store.
 

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And I thought why not...shopping carts are a lot more dirty than my thin 23mm tires right? Seems like any store that allows shopping carts should allow bicycles to be walked in stores.
This is really weak logic.
-I don't make it a habit of checking shopping cart tires but I doubt they are any more dirty than bike tires.
-Shopping carts are not "allowed by stores" they are provided by stores to serve the purpose of assisting their customers. They are esentially part of the store. Your bike isn't something the store owner put in there and isn't to assist you or any other customer.

You probably should have stopped with 'why not'. I can agree with that but there is not comparison to shopping carts.
 
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