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Never Give Up!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So with all to snow melting... mixed with the rain, my sump pump failed... the back up battery system failed... WTF!

I ended up with ENOUGH water in my basement to destroy all the carpeting, under-padding along with the floating tiled flooring in the laundry room.

The kids what to redo and split the basement into a movie theater and a dance area - The wife wants to make it into a gym/workout area.... I guess I know where my tax $$ are going this year :mad:
 

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The only people i know with a "movie theater " also have constant house guests. Don't get me wrong I like people just not all the time.
 

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Never Give Up!
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I really don't care too much what we do... my only requirements are to still have room for my bike and the overhead projector.... I need to watch something while on the trainer during the cold wet/rainy/snow filed winters
 

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Never Give Up!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The only people i know with a "movie theater " also have constant house guests. Don't get me wrong I like people just not all the time.
Yep my thought as well.... something to think about
 

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Suc-ks dude....Basements.....$$$. Hopefully you have some good insurance that will help with cost. I get uptight every time it rains.....
 

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I really don't care too much what we do... my only requirements are to still have room for my bike and the overhead projector.... I need to watch something while on the trainer during the cold wet/rainy/snow filed winters
A home gym in the basement is actually a good idea if you're lifting weights. You can save a lot of money on gym memberships in the long run.
 

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Two suggestions:

1.) install a water level alarm that will go off when water level gets above normal sump pump switch level.

2.) Consider putting DriCore underlayment under whatever flooring you install. It will buy you ~3/8" of water before your floor gets damaged.

DRIcore | Subfloor | Subloor R+ | SMARTWALL

The insulated version was not available when I installed it, but that is fine. The insulation takes up too much room and water would quickly fill the small voids in that system.

The combination of the two has saved me a mess a couple times.
 

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At least it wasn't a sanitary sewer backup :eek:

Which happened at my last house.

While I was out of the country, so my wife had to deal with it.

Common with old properties with original clay tile piping. And trees.

Personally, I wouldn't spend anything on a basement that's liable to flooding.

Either fix the issue properly first, or don't spend on renos.
 

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Personally, I wouldn't spend anything on a basement that's liable to flooding.
It's not the basement flooding that was his problem-presumably a working sump pump would have taken care of it. The problem was the sump pump failure. The reason it failed is he failed to test it, and the battery backup, periodically.

I like the water level alarm suggestion. Replace the pump and back up battery, and test it periodically. You'll be fine.

Personally, I think home theater rooms are like jacuzzis; they're popular for a short period of time, then attention drifts elsewhere and you have a wasted space.
 

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It's not the basement flooding that was his problem-presumably a working sump pump would have taken care of it. The problem was the sump pump failure. The reason it failed is he failed to test it, and the battery backup, periodically.

I like the water level alarm suggestion. Replace the pump and back up battery, and test it periodically. You'll be fine.

Personally, I think home theater rooms are like jacuzzis; they're popular for a short period of time, then attention drifts elsewhere and you have a wasted space.
In my area it does not take a special effort to test the sump pump, it runs a lot! Last month I had to get one one my basement walls (cinder block, not reinforced) repaired due to bowing from pressure. Water cannot be denied. To the OP, maybe you can compromise; part mobie theater part Zwift/bike training pain cave
 

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In my area it does not take a special effort to test the sump pump, it runs a lot! Last month I had to get one one my basement walls (cinder block, not reinforced) repaired due to bowing from pressure. Water cannot be denied. To the OP, maybe you can compromise; part mobie theater part Zwift/bike training pain cave
My point.

If your basement is below the surrounding water table then the potential for a flood is always there. I don't care how good your mechanical systems and alarms are.
 

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My point.

If your basement is below the surrounding water table then the potential for a flood is always there. I don't care how good your mechanical systems and alarms are.
My basement survived Sandy and Irene. Hopefully that is as bad as it ever gets. If I ever move I will pay more attention to the terrain and elevation
 

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Crusty AF
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My basement survived Sandy and Irene. Hopefully that is as bad as it ever gets. If I ever move I will pay more attention to the terrain and elevation
Just as a counterpoint... Our basement weeps like a teenage girl. However, there is never anything during the high volume, flashy precipitation events, as the vast majority of that water actually runs off into the municipal sewer system or into Lake Ontario about a block south of us. It's the longer, gentle events which see water coming through the walls and our sump pump going non-stop as there is very little runoff with most of the precip seeping into the ground. The saving grace where we are is the surrounding ground is thick, heavy clay which slows infiltration as well as movement through it, so we only normally have seepage and not vast amounts of water coming in.

All this to say that you may be surprised where and when the water comes in, and Sandy/Irene may not be your actual worst case scenarios.
 

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If you go the spend big $ route. Put one pump at the bottom of the basin. Put an alarm at the upper level of this pump. Add another pump above that alarm which should never run except when the pump#1 fails & the alarm is on. Make sure you can hear or observe the alarm from the kitchen or bedroom hall. If not, you need to add a remote alarm buzzer/light.

The original build should have had a drain tile field around the perimeter of the footing, but it is too late for that.
 
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