Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
2,009 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I read from a company that sells baselayers saying that bicyclists will be cooler when wearing a tight sleeveless baselayer, such as Underarmour, under their cycling jersey. The idea is that the sweat will be passed through to the jersey and then evaporated maintaining a dry skin rather than a sweaty skin that leads you to feel sticky and hot.

Anyone wear or have tried wearing a tight baselayer under their jersey?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
14,776 Posts
I do on all but the very hottest days. At some point it gets so hot that (seems to me) the extra insulation of the second layer outweighs the value of better wicking. So on the hottest days (like mid-90's and up) I wear a very light jersey with a long zipper that's open most of the time. The rest of the time I wear the baselayer, a very light one. I think the wicking thing does work. Perspiration evaporates more rapidly from the large surface area of the many fibers than it does from a thick layer on the skin.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,771 Posts
lawrence said:
I read from a company that sells baselayers saying that bicyclists will be cooler when wearing a tight sleeveless baselayer, such as Underarmour, under their cycling jersey. The idea is that the sweat will be passed through to the jersey and then evaporated maintaining a dry skin rather than a sweaty skin that leads you to feel sticky and hot.

Anyone wear or have tried wearing a tight baselayer under their jersey?
A lot of people wear base layers in hot weather. But i don't think your reasoning of 'why' is correct. the reason we sweat is to convect heat and cool our body. The body will be dry and feel cooler because the convection is happening at a faster rate then with a jersey alone. (which yea, you'd feel a bit sticker) But it also keeps the jersey off the body which is warmed by absorbing the sun. So it insulates from your outter layer while provideing more air flow to increase convection of sweat. (or water if you dump it over you which i highly recommend)
 

· Anti-Hero
Joined
·
10,405 Posts
Personally, I think triathletes have the right idea with the "less is more" clothing approach in hot weather. The act of any liquid evaporating off of your skin will cool you off, so it seems a little counterintuitive to try and encourage the sweat to evaporate from somewhere other than your skin.

But, to each his own.
 

· (not a real racer)
Joined
·
484 Posts
I'm starting to love base layers. I use to ride in just a jersey and I'd bring a windbreaker if it was cold. Now I use the base layer with a jersey and most of the time I leave the windbreaker at home. I got a couple "sport" t-shirts at Target for $9 each that seem to do the same thing as the $30+ UA ones from other places.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
885 Posts
fleck said:
A lot of people wear base layers in hot weather. But i don't think your reasoning of 'why' is correct. the reason we sweat is to convect heat and cool our body. The body will be dry and feel cooler because the convection is happening at a faster rate then with a jersey alone. (which yea, you'd feel a bit sticker) But it also keeps the jersey off the body which is warmed by absorbing the sun. So it insulates from your outter layer while provideing more air flow to increase convection of sweat. (or water if you dump it over you which i highly recommend)
It's not convection. Sweating cools you because it takes energy to evaporate sweat. The energy needed to convert sweat to water vapor is supplied by the heat of your body. The heat is, essentially, transferred from your body to the water vapor. The evaporation only happens on the surface of the liquid layer. A wicking base layer works by increasing the surface area of your sweat by absorbing it onto the many fibers of the (hydrophobic) base layer. So the cooling happens over the entire surface area moistened by your sweat rather than from just the surface area of the big ol' drops of sweat that normally form on your skin and the big ol' pools of sweat that collect in a hydrophilic base layer such as cotton.

And, as noted above, it only works under certain conditions: if it is so hot and/or dry that your sweat evaporates as soon as it is formed, there is no advantage to the wicking base layer. And, if it is very hot and moist so that the rate of evaporation slows down significantly, the insulating properties of the base layer may outweigh the greater rate of evaporation. Under most normal environmental conditions in a temperate climate, though, wicking base layers work well.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
I'm a n avid baselayr guy also. I got a couple sleveless from Performance for $10, and like robbyracer found them much more comfortable than a jersey and jacket. But, I've tried them in the heat and no go. Definitely feel hotter with them in spite of the rap.
 

· Squirrel Hunter
Joined
·
3,854 Posts
Mesh

lawrence said:
...a tight sleeveless baselayer, such as Underarmour...

Anyone wear or have tried wearing a tight baselayer under their jersey?
Well I regularly wear a Light mesh baselayer under my jersey year round. The wicking works well in the winter to stay dry in order to avoid the chill. In the summer I like the fact that it keeps me dryer too as I have often had the cold belly from getting sweaty and then all the breeze being directed to my sweaty belly which then gets uber cool. Another advantage of wearing a base layer is that if you crash then the fabric of the jersey slides against the base layer rather than gripping to your skin and giving you a nice strawberry.

In the summer I believe I would avoid a Tight baselayer such as Underarmour. Really not sure why folks go wild using that brand for cycling other than the pro ball sport athletes use it. Cycling specific stuff is cut and designed for our sport. My preferences for summer are DeFeet and Voler, for cold or wet weather I like Craft.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
I am most prominently disgusted with the sight of my aging carcass in any form,
hence base layers, long tights and long-sleeved jersies are all the rage around here.
Another benefit (in all but the hottest weather is that my knees seem to like having
something on them to keep them warm. Of course that's easy to say when it hasn't
even been 80 degrees here yet.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
8,000 Posts
Creakyknees said:
Not in Texas in the summer. NFW. When it's 90+ at 7 am, I'm wearing a white jersey with a full length zipper.

.
I am with you. Florida summers are too hot and humid for BL.
 

· For president!
Joined
·
7,851 Posts
D&MsDad said:
It's not convection. Sweating cools you because it takes energy to evaporate sweat. The energy needed to convert sweat to water vapor is supplied by the heat of your body. The heat is, essentially, transferred from your body to the water vapor. The evaporation only happens on the surface of the liquid layer. A wicking base layer works by increasing the surface area of your sweat by absorbing it onto the many fibers of the (hydrophobic) base layer. So the cooling happens over the entire surface area moistened by your sweat rather than from just the surface area of the big ol' drops of sweat that normally form on your skin and the big ol' pools of sweat that collect in a hydrophilic base layer such as cotton.

And, as noted above, it only works under certain conditions: if it is so hot and/or dry that your sweat evaporates as soon as it is formed, there is no advantage to the wicking base layer. And, if it is very hot and moist so that the rate of evaporation slows down significantly, the insulating properties of the base layer may outweigh the greater rate of evaporation. Under most normal environmental conditions in a temperate climate, though, wicking base layers work well.
This explanation seems like nonsense to me.

I don't see any reason to wear an under armor style baselayer to try and counter hot weather. It makes as much sense as putting on a wool sweater.
 

· Cheese is my copilot
Joined
·
3,885 Posts
Keeping up with Junior said:
Another advantage of wearing a base layer is that if you crash then the fabric of the jersey slides against the base layer rather than gripping to your skin and giving you a nice strawberry.
That's the only reason for a base layer in hot weather that I can see. Jerseys are already made of wicking material, so a base layer seems redundant in that regard.
 

· Banned forever.....or not
Joined
·
24,573 Posts
Only for Crits.
A mesh baselayer will save just a little skin when you go sliding around on your back.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
On the motorcycle I wear a water soaked vest that stays wet for about 3 hours. As the wind hits it, it makes you feel 20 degrees cooler, it is called evaporative cooling. I think that is the theory about base layers. For me it does not work at all on the bicycle. Once the base layer gets wet it stays wet for the whole ride making me feel clammy.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
577 Posts
That just means youre not going fast enough. My average speed is such that not only am I passing cars so fast they look like theyre all on cinder blocks but Im also permanently dry as the wind whisks all sweat away from me. The few cars that can keep up with me stay at least 50 feet back so as not to get sprayed on.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top