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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'd been riding all winter... rain, snow, slush... the only thing that was enough to get me off my bike was ice. Then Christmas came. I had to spend a few days off the bike because of family commitments and such. Then disaster.
*cough* *wheeze* *lungs crackling* This ain't good. Spent almost 2 weeks laid up with pneumonia. Spent another 2 weeks fighting off what was left of a chest cold.
So I FINALLY made it out. Rode to work. Wow... the bike was in AWFUL shape. Shame on me for not checking it out the night before. I just hopped on and started riding. Big mistake. Both disc brakes were rubbing. "NO BIG DEAL! I'll just pull the pads out a bit and fix it when I get home." Except that the inside pads were stuck to the calipers. These, of course, were the ones that were rubbing. Most of the way there, I realized "Hey, I'm in the big ring (on my MTB). I should change that." Had to make the change with my foot since the front derailleur was kinda sticking. I muscled it out to work anyway... All 14 miles of it.

I get out of work. STart heading home. My usual 1 hour commute took me 1:45! When I got the bike inside, I started working on it. Of course... it's Saturday. We had a near 60F day. Could've spent the day out on my bike if it wasn't in pieces. Here's why:

1) Leaving the bike in the shed was a bad idea. It'll NEVER happen (during the winter) again. The freeze/thaw we had in Detroit did a real number on anything that could rust.
2) Chain had less than 100 miles on it. Totaled. Already been pitched.
3) Stainless Eggies were in rough shape. SOme WD40 (for the rust) and a bit of elbow grease, and they're ALMOST as good as new. New bearings, of course.
4) Pulleys on my rear derailleur don't really spin. They grind. New pulleys already in-hand.
5) The BB... wow... um.... *GRIND* Got a new shimano. Was kind of surprised to see it had a plastic cup, though.
6) Brakes. WOw... um... winter grime and water got into 'em. Took some pliers to get the pads off the calipers. Hit 'em with blowtorch to get any contaminants out of the pads. Calipers spent some time in some SimpleGreen being thoroughly cleaned. They're ALMOST as good as new (save a scratch or two)
7) Boinger was in bad shape. Pulled the Judy apart, cleaned it, relubed it, put it back together. Gave it an oilbath as well. Neat little upgrade. Should be as good (or better?) than new.
8) Wheels looked awful. Overhauled the hubs. The wheels are now at the only known competent wheel builder in the area being looked at. Spoke tension didn't feel right (shoudl this move this much?!). SHould have 'em back in a few days.

I took the bike down to the frame (save the headset races). Washed it up real well. Greased what needed to be greased on its way back onto the frame. It's about half-built now. Waiting on a few parts before I can finish the task. In the end... it may not LOOK like a brand new bike (scratches, anyone?) but it should ride like, or better, than new.

I'll be sure to let ya all know how this project turned out. I had to buy a few tools to do my first overhaul. I never thought I'd build a bike up from parts (which is essentially what I've done after cleaning everything). Now I won't be afraid to do it when it's time to get me a road/touring bike. :)

Oh... and while I"m thinking of it... the moral of the story is <b>Keep your bike clean!</b>
 

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Yeah, but if you keep it clean ALL the time (or keep all of them clean all of the time) you never get the satisfaction of that full-strip, high-pressure effort of pulling them back from the brink of death.

Nice work, Doctor.
 

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Kudos

I was born in Mt. Clemans, and lived in SE Michigan for 18 years. (was back there in November for Thanksgiving)

The whole region isn't exactly "bike friendly", so you are to be commended for actually commuting during winter time around there! Can I ask where, roughly, your commute starts and ends? Just trying to get a better mental picture of your scenery.



simoriah said:
I'd been riding all winter... rain, snow, slush... the only thing that was enough to get me off my bike was ice. Then Christmas came. I had to spend a few days off the bike because of family commitments and such. Then disaster.
*cough* *wheeze* *lungs crackling* This ain't good. Spent almost 2 weeks laid up with pneumonia. Spent another 2 weeks fighting off what was left of a chest cold.
So I FINALLY made it out. Rode to work. Wow... the bike was in AWFUL shape. Shame on me for not checking it out the night before. I just hopped on and started riding. Big mistake. Both disc brakes were rubbing. "NO BIG DEAL! I'll just pull the pads out a bit and fix it when I get home." Except that the inside pads were stuck to the calipers. These, of course, were the ones that were rubbing. Most of the way there, I realized "Hey, I'm in the big ring (on my MTB). I should change that." Had to make the change with my foot since the front derailleur was kinda sticking. I muscled it out to work anyway... All 14 miles of it.

I get out of work. STart heading home. My usual 1 hour commute took me 1:45! When I got the bike inside, I started working on it. Of course... it's Saturday. We had a near 60F day. Could've spent the day out on my bike if it wasn't in pieces. Here's why:

1) Leaving the bike in the shed was a bad idea. It'll NEVER happen (during the winter) again. The freeze/thaw we had in Detroit did a real number on anything that could rust.
2) Chain had less than 100 miles on it. Totaled. Already been pitched.
3) Stainless Eggies were in rough shape. SOme WD40 (for the rust) and a bit of elbow grease, and they're ALMOST as good as new. New bearings, of course.
4) Pulleys on my rear derailleur don't really spin. They grind. New pulleys already in-hand.
5) The BB... wow... um.... *GRIND* Got a new shimano. Was kind of surprised to see it had a plastic cup, though.
6) Brakes. WOw... um... winter grime and water got into 'em. Took some pliers to get the pads off the calipers. Hit 'em with blowtorch to get any contaminants out of the pads. Calipers spent some time in some SimpleGreen being thoroughly cleaned. They're ALMOST as good as new (save a scratch or two)
7) Boinger was in bad shape. Pulled the Judy apart, cleaned it, relubed it, put it back together. Gave it an oilbath as well. Neat little upgrade. Should be as good (or better?) than new.
8) Wheels looked awful. Overhauled the hubs. The wheels are now at the only known competent wheel builder in the area being looked at. Spoke tension didn't feel right (shoudl this move this much?!). SHould have 'em back in a few days.

I took the bike down to the frame (save the headset races). Washed it up real well. Greased what needed to be greased on its way back onto the frame. It's about half-built now. Waiting on a few parts before I can finish the task. In the end... it may not LOOK like a brand new bike (scratches, anyone?) but it should ride like, or better, than new.

I'll be sure to let ya all know how this project turned out. I had to buy a few tools to do my first overhaul. I never thought I'd build a bike up from parts (which is essentially what I've done after cleaning everything). Now I won't be afraid to do it when it's time to get me a road/touring bike. :)

Oh... and while I"m thinking of it... the moral of the story is <b>Keep your bike clean!</b>
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
stuart said:
I was born in Mt. Clemans, and lived in SE Michigan for 18 years. (was back there in November for Thanksgiving)

The whole region isn't exactly "bike friendly", so you are to be commended for actually commuting during winter time around there! Can I ask where, roughly, your commute starts and ends? Just trying to get a better mental picture of your scenery.

Can you ask? You just did. Will I actually tell you? Now THAT is the question! :D

I start at 17/Dequindre. From there, I take one of two routes. I either head to 16/JohnR to drop my kid off at the daycare, then head north to 17 mile again... or I just head straight down 17 mile. Take that down to Beach Road (about half a mile west of Coolidge). Take that north 2 miles to Square Lake. Turn Left onto Sq Lake (19 mile). Another mile gets me to Squirrel. Turn right (north). Take that north to the Chrysler tech center. Round trip is 13-14.5 miles. It's all generally bike friendly except for that little bit of John R I have to deal with 3 days a week.

For now... I've decided that during the winter, I can deal with just about ANY cold Mother Nature throws at me. If the roads are wet (or snowy)... the bike stays home. I'm NOT forcing myself into another emergency cleaning like this.
 

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It's been raining so much in Oregon...

I saw a pedestrian rust solid while crossing the street. We haven't seen sunlight in so long, I'm afraid I'll burst into flames like a vampire when we do finally see it... almost 10" of rain for the month of January so far. Bike lanes have more debris in them than the single-track trails.

I'd love to bike commute in, but I don't have a snorkel... good news is the bikes still look good hanging up in the garage.
 

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Do you have fenders on your bike? Have you considered a fixed gear for the slush/snowy days. Both made my life commuting very easy.
MN Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
MN Dan said:
Do you have fenders on your bike? Have you considered a fixed gear for the slush/snowy days. Both made my life commuting very easy.
MN Dan
Yep... full coverage fenders.

I'd LOVE to have another bike or two in the stable... but I can't afford it. Don't have room for it right now, either. I'm buying a house in the very near future. House>Bikes right now.
 
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