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Hi. I just purchased a new Trek Madone. Since I am not good with fixing things, I've had to bring the bike in to the shop twice within the first two weeks to adjust the derailleurs, and fix a squealing brake.

I am not saying this to complain, however, I'm interested in the new bike break in process. Approximately how long does the break in process last? What are all the things involved in a new bike breaking in?

About how long will it be before all things settle in on my new bike, everyting is adjusted, and I can ride it without issues or worries?
 

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"Cable stretch" is quite normal. New brakes often need to wear in a bit... and really don't need to be "fixed."

But really, bikes don't need to be "broken in."

the sky above said:
Hi. I just purchased a new Trek Madone. Since I am not good with fixing things, I've had to bring the bike in to the shop twice within the first two weeks to adjust the derailleurs, and fix a squealing brake.

I am not saying this to complain, however, I'm interested in the new bike break in process. Approximately how long does the break in process last? What are all the things involved in a new bike breaking in?

About how long will it be before all things settle in on my new bike, everyting is adjusted, and I can ride it without issues or worries?
 

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filtersweep said:
"Cable stretch" is quite normal. New brakes often need to wear in a bit... and really don't need to be "fixed."

But really, bikes don't need to be "broken in."
About how long will it be before all things settle in on my new bike, everyting is adjusted, and I can ride it without issues or worries?
On the other hand, things can go out of adjustment, or get worn, any time, and bicycles often require a little bit of maintenance to perform at their best. For anyone who plans to ride much, it's worth learning to do the basic things, (and to recognize when they need doing), so you can always have the bike working well without the time and expense of a trip to the shop.

The cable and brake adjustments you just got, for example, are very simple, and anyone with a tiny bit of mechanical aptitude can learn to do them. Next time you go to the shop to have something done, or when you ride with a more experienced friend, get some free lessons. People who cycle a lot do these things at a moment's notice, with little interruption. You can check a lot of stuff before you start a ride, and fix many things in a few seconds. Chances are good that the derailleur adjustment you needed could be done while riding the bike -- without stopping (once you know how).

Don't be intimidated by the machine. It's not a black box full of microchips, or a car engine full of incomprehensible greasy parts. It's a simple and elegant machine, with all the commonly- maintained parts exposed and understandable.
 

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Easy for you to say, you've obviously never seen me trying to fix anything
other than a spreadsheet! I change and inflate tires, clean and lube chains,
change brake pads, and possibly change pedals and seat height and fore\aft.
Derailleur adjustments, wheel truing, bb pulling, etc. I will defer to the expert
mech for that stuff. Seems the older I get, the more mechanically inept I become.
 
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