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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I was thinking about this since a friend (who is a pretty prolific rider) had a crash and shattered his hip like it was a piece of china. From observing his body type (approaching a Schleck), late 40s age, and knowing his single minded ness for huge road riding hours (no other exercise) I had a feeling something like this would happen.

My activities:
-Crossfit type work, all winter 2-3 times a week.
-Mountain biking and cross racing (found to be more bone loading)
-Will follow up a few rides a week with some jump rope in the garage.
 

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I too have fractured a hip as a result of a fall off a bike. However this was after about 10 other falls over the years when nothing of importance got fractured. In my case it was definitely HOW I fell that caused the fracture. Surgeon who drilled into me said my bone was nice and hard, and a follow-up bone scan (a 10 minute simple procedure), was OK too.

So I don't think that every break is due to low bone density. If one is concerned, the first step would be the bone scan.
 

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The Cube
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an electrolyte drink with calcium in it, so the first source for replacement isn't from bone mass, vitamin D, 30 jumping jacks every day for a little impact, and an occasional plyometrics workout for more impact.
 

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I hike once a week. The only thing I've ever uploaded my strava account is a hike: Strava Segment | Koko Hike - Bottom to Top

I walk to the market two or three times a week. Occasionally I'll lift weights or jump rope. I can't see how this is a concern unless a person does *nothing* except ride the bike and sit in an office chair. Even if my activities were limited to walking the 1/2mi to the market I wouldn't be worried.
 

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CEO Of The Internet
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Aside from diet, exercise that provides a form of "jarring" to the muscular-skeletal system is best for BMD maintenance/improvement. Jogging, skipping, field sports that make you run/jump about (e.g. basketball) are the sort of activities to consider.

There's a few studies on pubmed you can check out re BMD and athletes.
I don't know about basketball.
 

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I tried swimming as part of my winter work-out. I swear I thought I could swim better than I can... oh well.

I do a walk-run during cold and/or wet weather when I don't cycle. I know the CDC says I need to include weight-lifting into my work-out routine [90 minutes a week] but I haven't done that yet.

Thanks for the reminder.
 

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have droids, will party
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My job is pretty physical, lots of lifting and impact. I also do about an hour and a half of weights preceded by a 1mi run warmup once a week. I'm not too concerned about bone density loss. I'm alot more concerned with joints giving out before I'm done with them, though weight training (with correct form) mitigates joint injuries by strengthening ligaments and tendons.
 

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In my last physical the doctor told me that I am vitamin D deficient, so he ordered a bone scan, just to be sure. All is well, but I am 50 and worry about lower bone density. Now I take calcium and D supplements to be sure.

I spent the winter on the bike (14-16 hourper week for base) instead of downhill skiing, so I got in very little impact training. Normally skiing provides a ton of impact, especially since I do plenty of bumps too.

I cannot wait to start mountain biking since that will fix the problem. I ride and race a rigid single speed so I should be ok.
 

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Bone density is something a lot of people who exercise a lot do not take into account. This is especially true if they are losing weight and run a calorie deficit. At some point your body will think you are starving. The you may end up storing fat, and one weigh you lose weight is in bone density.

As others have said one good way to help stave it off is varying your workouts. I run as well, and when the weather warms I will start swimming again for triathlons. I also take a multivitamin and calcium. If you take calcium be sure you drink plenty of water throughout the day. You want to be sure to flush any surplus so you don't get buildups that become kidney stones.
 

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I was thinking about this since a friend (who is a pretty prolific rider) had a crash and shattered his hip like it was a piece of china. From observing his body type (approaching a Schleck), late 40s age, and knowing his single minded ness for huge road riding hours (no other exercise) I had a feeling something like this would happen.

My activities:
-Crossfit type work, all winter 2-3 times a week.
-Mountain biking and cross racing (found to be more bone loading)
-Will follow up a few rides a week with some jump rope in the garage.
I'm a 54 year old ultra-marathon cyclist. Although I dropped out of the sport for several years, long-distant cycling is pretty much the only physical activity I've regularly participated in since high school. This past December (4 months after breaking the 300 mile Wisconsin cross state record), my bike slipped on ice and I ended up breaking my femur. I ended up getting a total hip replacement.

I asked the surgeon if he thought I had low density bones that might have contributed to it. But he said 'no', my bones were dense. However, I am still taking extra measures these days and getting extra calcium and vitamin D3 suppliments, both to aid the growth of new bone that needs to fuse to the new hip parts, but also (hopefully) to strengthen my bones in general. Although I've been told by my surgeon to not take up running, as it could shorten the life of the new hip (I don't care because I've never liked running), I am still concerned with getting some type of exercises that will help in this matter.
 

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I'm pretty sure I read a study somewhere that said that all these "fancy drinks" from Starbucks- the lattés and such- have so much more milk in them that the rates of low bone density and osteoporosis is down. That led me to do the math on the latté I drink- its 50% of my daily calcium in just one drink!

Now I have a good excuse to treat myself to that lovely caramel-flavored treat every day. :)

On a side note: I have tried calcium supplements- would love to take them but my stomach doesn't handle them well.
 
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