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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok Heres the deal, I Have a 2009 Schwinn Cutter , Its a good bike and its just about to turn 1 years old and definitely has seen over 1000 miles. I use this bike as my main source of transportation. Also I do a lot of recreational riding on the side.
I'm starting to have some rear hub trouble, I'm sure I just need to replace the bearings and repack the grease, but I also want to get a smaller rear cog because the 42x18 doesn't have enough power for the road. I also plan on repainting the bike because bike racks and light poles have taken their toll.
I want to do the repairs but the fact is i have no tools, I live on campus and I don't know anyone with tools and the bike shops around here like to overcharge because its a college town.

So my question is it worth it to repair this bike and make my upgrades, or to purchase a new one Draft local bikestore 199, or purchase an old road bike off craigslist and try to convert that one. I really don't have to much money to spend, but I can find some (200). I just moved 8.2 miles from campus and I plan on riding to school 5 days a week minimum (all bike trail so no traffic). So what should I do?
 

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I live in a college town and find the shops are pretty competitive, price-wise. I don't see anyone gouging students, anyway. Shop around and ask around - someone will steer you to the right mechanic.

That said, none of what your bike needs is difficult to do. I'm certain you can find Youtube how-to videos on cog and bearing replacement. Seriously - you can knock out both jobs in about half an hour. You'll need a couple of cone wrenches, a lockring tool, and a chainwhip. Every fixed-gear rider ought to have those on hand anyway. The cog will cost you $25 and the hub bearings maybe two bucks. A tube of grease and you're good to go.

Replacing a Cutter with a Draft seems foolish. Both are hi-ten frames and forks, so there's no upgrade happening. All you're getting is a different cheap bike than the one you've got, and in another year you'll be back where you are now.

Building up and converting an old frame is a cool project, but you'll spend more than buying the tools and parts you need to get the Cutter up and running.
 

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Militant commuter
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Don't try to build one up...remember that your original post said you don't have the tools.

Have you looked around your college town to see if there's a bike co-op or similar? Or similarly-minded young cyclists who may just happen to have some tools to share?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well the project thing was something had on my Agenda, this is the time of year all the leases end and people are dumping there road bikes on craigslist, so could potentially pick up a nice lightweight 56cm frame easily. My biggest complaint about my bike now is the WEIGHT and I want deep V rims.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
SilverStar said:
Don't try to build one up...remember that your original post said you don't have the tools.

Have you looked around your college town to see if there's a bike co-op or similar? Or similarly-minded young cyclists who may just happen to have some tools to share?
Hey man, your post alone made my day. I googled it and there is one downtown that offers free repair as long as I'm willing to learn how to do the repair so next time I can do it myself. awesomeness thankyou.
 

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Etv5002 said:
Well the project thing was something had on my Agenda, this is the time of year all the leases end and people are dumping there road bikes on craigslist, so could potentially pick up a nice lightweight 56cm frame easily. My biggest complaint about my bike now is the WEIGHT and I want deep V rims.

I dunno... you need to find a frame with horizontal dropouts, and that means it'll probably be kind of old, and so it won't necessarily be very light. And personally, I can think of a lot of things I'd buy instead of deep-Vs if I was concerned about weight.

And while you might be able to use some parts from the Cutter to build up a CL frame, your threadless stem, headset, seatpost, and bottom bracket may not be compatible, depending on the frame you find.
 

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Etv5002 said:
Hey man, your post alone made my day. I googled it and there is one downtown that offers free repair as long as I'm willing to learn how to do the repair so next time I can do it myself. awesomeness thankyou.
You're quite welcome -- I support a co-op here in Florida, and they are worth their weight in gold, especially if you are willing to learn. And, once you learn the basics, you'll be unleashing a bike-building ANIMAL....next thing you know, you'll have an entire fleet of bikes you assembled and can maintain yourself!
 

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Nothing you can do with that bike - repair or modification - is at all difficult. Fix it at the co-op.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BianchiJoe said:
I dunno... you need to find a frame with horizontal dropouts, and that means it'll probably be kind of old, and so it won't necessarily be very light. And personally, I can think of a lot of things I'd buy instead of deep-Vs if I was concerned about weight.

And while you might be able to use some parts from the Cutter to build up a CL frame, your threadless stem, headset, seatpost, and bottom bracket may not be compatible, depending on the frame you find.
Honestly the cutter is dead to me, once I get that bike back in order it'll just be a commuter bike till I find something better then it will be a bad weather back-up.

I'm starting to think now about moving on to my next bike, which I don't plan to have ready till may. I thought craigslist would be a good way to go because I bought a road bike off there before that was a 70's or 80's Schwinn Sprint (which was stolen).

What do you think I should be looking at? and what types of rims do you think would be better?
Also with this local co-op it seems possible that I would be able to build a complete bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
SilverStar said:
You're quite welcome -- I support a co-op here in Florida, and they are worth their weight in gold, especially if you are willing to learn. And, once you learn the basics, you'll be unleashing a bike-building ANIMAL....next thing you know, you'll have an entire fleet of bikes you assembled and can maintain yourself!
Yeah man this is the local co-op, it seems pretty awesome plus they offer used parts and such.
 

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Etv5002 said:
Honestly the cutter is dead to me, once I get that bike back in order it'll just be a commuter bike till I find something better
Oh. You originally asked if it was "worth it to repair this bike and make my upgrades, or purchase a new one."

Etv5002 said:
What do you think I should be looking at?
I don't know what to tell you, since Craigslist frames are pretty much all over the place, in terms of size, materials, and condition. I guess when the time comes you can compare what's available in your price range. Look for something made out of butted steel from Reynolds, Tange or Sanko - or at least something that isn't hi-ten steel.

Etv5002 said:
what types of rims do you think would be better?
I'm not impressed with deep Vs beyond the fashion statement. Mavic Open-Pro CDs or CXP 33s have always been reliable and are lighter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
BianchiJoe said:
Oh. You originally asked if it was "worth it to repair this bike and make my upgrades, or purchase a new one."



I don't know what to tell you, since Craigslist frames are pretty much all over the place, in terms of size, materials, and condition. I guess when the time comes you can compare what's available in your price range. Look for something made out of butted steel from Reynolds, Tange or Sanko - or at least something that isn't hi-ten steel.



I'm not impressed with deep Vs beyond the fashion statement. Mavic Open-Pro CDs or CXP 33s have always been reliable and are lighter.

Sorry, yeah you answered my original question its worth it to repair the cutter instead of buying the draft seeing how its the exact same thing. Now I'm just looking for what would be the best option looking forward because I want to work on moving to a better bike, till then though the Cutter will be my bike as I gather money.
 

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Etv5002 said:
I want to work on moving to a better bike, till then though the Cutter will be my bike as I gather money.
A friend of mine makes it a policy to never spend a five-dollar bill. Whenever he gets one, he puts it in a jar, no matter what. He saved up about $500 in just a few months that way.

When you get a decent amount of money (however you manage to save it), start looking around for frames and parts. But get the frame first, so you know the parts will fit it. Here in Austin, there's a monthly "Frankenbike" swap meet where people buy and sell their gear at garage-sale prices. Way cooler than Craigslist, IMO. See if the guys at the co-op bike repair place know of anything like that going on in your town. Or better yet, start one!

http://frankenbike.net/
 
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