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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 6-hour cycling activity for mid-August, but I don't know what to bring to eat (no restaurants around). Please don't say sandwiches. Although it's portable, the sandwiches my wife makes are really bad(I dare not tell her :censored: ). Do you have any other portable food suggestions?:unsure:
 

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Rice cakes are a favorite among pro cyclists. You can make them with a variety of ingredients for your personal preference.
You say there are (no restaurants around. Are there stores you can buy snacks? Where do you intend to get water for a 6hr ride?



 

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I have a 6-hour cycling activity for mid-August, but I don't know what to bring to eat (no restaurants around). Please don't say sandwiches. Although it's portable, the sandwiches my wife makes are really bad(I dare not tell her :censored: ). Do you have any other portable food suggestions?:unsure:
Uh, how about you make a sandwich you like and not blame it on your wife? Lots of choices ranging from fig bars, dates, and mixed nuts to dozens of choices of sports drinks, gels, bars, etc. You've provided zero information about this "cycling activity" but round numbers you'll want to consume around 1000-1500 calories assuming you start will a good meal beforehand. You learn what your nutrition needs are by doing long rides and figuring out what works. You don't seem to have prepared for this ride.
 

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Along with the gels and blocks, I bring a credit card and a $20 bill... found an awesome restaurant in the middle of nowhere on my last ride and ended up with a small batch root beer and a grilled salmon sandwich with really good sprouts...
 

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Uh, how about you make a sandwich you like and not blame it on your wife? Lots of choices ranging from fig bars, dates, and mixed nuts to dozens of choices of sports drinks, gels, bars, etc. You've provided zero information about this "cycling activity" but round numbers you'll want to consume around 1000-1500 calories assuming you start will a good meal beforehand. You learn what your nutrition needs are by doing long rides and figuring out what works. You don't seem to have prepared for this ride.

Sounds like a new sandwich maker is in order. HTH.

AH. DAMN. This isn't teh Lounge.
 
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I bring a mix of things on long rides.

  • Solid food = Natures Bakery Fig Bars is my main go-to
  • Sugar/Carbs = Natural Maple Syrup (either Ted King's Untapped brand, or a HydraPak Soft Flask full of maple syrup I fill at home). This stuff is so much better tasting (subjective) and easier to eat/digest than any gel I've ever tried.
  • Hydration = I prefer to keep my calories and hydration separate, as the weather and other factors will mean different ratios of hydration vs calories required, so I only keep water in my bottles.
    • I prefer an electrolyte option that has sodium as well as magnesium, and potassium. My preferred option is Lyte Balance concentrated electrolyte, especially if it's hot. It's not sweetened or flavored at all and doesn't make a mess of my bottles.
    • An alternative to Lyte Balance is something like the Salt Stik capsules or tablets. They are small and easy to carry. I don't love the taste of them, but I always keep a pack of them in my bags just in case.
All of this stuff is easy to get on Amazon, or even Costco or your local grocery (fig bars).


If the ride has supported rest stops, and they offer something decent at rest stops, I'll eat solid food there. Cookies, small sandwiches, salty chips, etc.. in small to moderate quantities.

If there are convenience stores/service stations along the way, I might help myself to a caffeinated beverage (cold, sugary soft drink or cold brew if the weather is hot, or maybe a warm coffee if it's cold).
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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Uh, how about you make a sandwich you like and not blame it on your wife?
BINGO!

Things I bring:

A sandwich which I make.
Nuts
Dried fruit
At least two full water bottles.

If I stop at a convenience store to use their bathroom, I'll usually buy a banana.
 
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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
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371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Rice cakes are a favorite among pro cyclists. You can make them with a variety of ingredients for your personal preference.
You say there are (no restaurants around. Are there stores you can buy snacks? Where do you intend to get water for a 6hr ride?



Thanks for your recipe, I will learn to do it today. My friend told me to bring lunch as the ride was on the coastal road, so I wasn't sure there were shops there. I forgot that I need to drink water in 6 hours and I'm still thinking about how to bring water :unsure: .
 

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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
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371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Uh, how about you make a sandwich you like and not blame it on your wife? Lots of choices ranging from fig bars, dates, and mixed nuts to dozens of choices of sports drinks, gels, bars, etc. You've provided zero information about this "cycling activity" but round numbers you'll want to consume around 1000-1500 calories assuming you start will a good meal beforehand. You learn what your nutrition needs are by doing long rides and figuring out what works. You don't seem to have prepared for this ride.
My wife also participated in this ride. She has been very excited since she heard the news yesterday. She wants to make something delicious for her friends. I think your suggestion is good. I am going to bring some nuts and bars. Maybe I should try making sandwiches by myself (maybe it won't taste good either, but I at least tried):D
 

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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
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371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nothing. If you are into fasting think autophagy.
Maybe my brain was excited at that time and I didn't feel hungry, but when I saw other people eating, I probably wanted to eat too.
 

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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
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371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
BINGO!

Things I bring:

A sandwich which I make.
Nuts
Dried fruit
At least two full water bottles.

If I stop at a convenience store to use their bathroom, I'll usually buy a banana.
If I stop at a convenience store to use their bathroom, I'll usually buy a banana.
Something like his should be sufficient for just about everyone.
Thank you very much:LOL:, The food in the video is really portable(y)
 

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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
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371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Along with the gels and blocks, I bring a credit card and a $20 bill... found an awesome restaurant in the middle of nowhere on my last ride and ended up with a small batch root beer and a grilled salmon sandwich with really good sprouts...
I hope I'm as lucky as you are to find a great restaurant:coffee:
 

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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
Joined
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371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I bring a mix of things on long rides.

  • Solid food = Natures Bakery Fig Bars is my main go-to
  • Sugar/Carbs = Natural Maple Syrup (either Ted King's Untapped brand, or a HydraPak Soft Flask full of maple syrup I fill at home). This stuff is so much better tasting (subjective) and easier to eat/digest than any gel I've ever tried.
  • Hydration = I prefer to keep my calories and hydration separate, as the weather and other factors will mean different ratios of hydration vs calories required, so I only keep water in my bottles.
    • I prefer an electrolyte option that has sodium as well as magnesium, and potassium. My preferred option is Lyte Balance concentrated electrolyte, especially if it's hot. It's not sweetened or flavored at all and doesn't make a mess of my bottles.
    • An alternative to Lyte Balance is something like the Salt Stik capsules or tablets. They are small and easy to carry. I don't love the taste of them, but I always keep a pack of them in my bags just in case.
All of this stuff is easy to get on Amazon, or even Costco or your local grocery (fig bars).


If the ride has supported rest stops, and they offer something decent at rest stops, I'll eat solid food there. Cookies, small sandwiches, salty chips, etc.. in small to moderate quantities.

If there are convenience stores/service stations along the way, I might help myself to a caffeinated beverage (cold, sugary soft drink or cold brew if the weather is hot, or maybe a warm coffee if it's cold).
Thank You! Your reply sounds very professional😍, this is my first long trip where I need to bring lunch, I am going to go to the supermarket to find the food you mentioned, I hope to see a convenience store/service station along the way and have a cup of hot coffee:coffee:
 

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Souke Sports - Where Cycling Gear Meets Fashion
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371 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
BINGO!

Things I bring:

A sandwich which I make.
Nuts
Dried fruit
At least two full water bottles.

If I stop at a convenience store to use their bathroom, I'll usually buy a banana.
Nuts and bananas are really good choices and easy to carry(y)
 

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Why don't you ask if there are places to get stuff? There has to be, otherwise, you will need a lot of stuff. And extra tire stuff. Maybe a camelback would help with the water, my goto snack is Granola Bars, but they are not really a meal. When I did RAIN, ride across indiana, I used HEED Perpetum, a lot of calories in easy digestable form for focusing on speed & power.
 

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Bianchi Eros
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BINGO!

Things I bring:

A sandwich which I make.
Nuts
Dried fruit
At least two full water bottles.

If I stop at a convenience store to use their bathroom, I'll usually buy a banana.
If you eat dried foods, you need to consider that your body will need the corresponding water to re-hydrate it.
If you eat dried fruit, or beef jerky, you need to drink a lot of water with it.

Also, if you eat those energy gel packets, each requires a certain amount of water with it, or you will feel sick.
 
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