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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know of any frames that would work for me?
According to wrench science fit, my reach is 76.26cm, but I should be riding an 58cm frame.
(I have a long torso, long arms and very good flexibility, but a very normal 34 inseam.)
That's a top tube of at least 60cm c-c and a stem of 160mm or some other combination.
Longest stem I can reasonably find is normally 140, though I've seen a few 150's. So, are any 58cm c-c frames going to have a top tube long enough that I can combine it with a 150 stem and have the right reach?
Mike
 

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classiquesklassieker
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Correct inseam?

Snapster said:
Does anyone know of any frames that would work for me?
According to wrench science fit, my reach is 76.26cm, but I should be riding an 58cm frame.
(I have a long torso, long arms and very good flexibility, but a very normal 34 inseam.)
That's a top tube of at least 60cm c-c and a stem of 160mm or some other combination.
Longest stem I can reasonably find is normally 140, though I've seen a few 150's. So, are any 58cm c-c frames going to have a top tube long enough that I can combine it with a 150 stem and have the right reach?
Mike
First of all, I would check to see that you measured your "cycling inseam", not your "regular inseam". Do a search to find out exactly what the difference is.

You might want to consider a frame with long top-tube with steep seat-tube angle. Using a seatpost with a large setback (Easton has a model), it will put you even further back relative to where the top-tube meets the seat-tube, and give you a longer reach. I think Trek bikes may be a good candidate, and maybe Specialized, but you should check the charts.

Most basic fitting softwares - and I'll bet especially the free ones - are tailored to the average joe and jane, so if indeed you have very unusual proportions, I wouldn't think that the numbers are set in stone. Reach can also be increased by lowering your handlebar/stem.
 

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if your pant leg is 34

and you have a long reach you can ride bigger than a 58. most likely as big as a 60 (with a 60 TT) I ride a 61 Merckx with a 60 TT and a 130 stem and I'm built kinda similar to you.
a 140 stem would stretch you even farther. F the wrench science thing go to a shop where you can get a real fit. If you are an absolute abnormality you have 2 options

a) get a XXL compact geometry frame as it will provide you standover and a long reach

b) go custom. have a frame builder build a bike around your geometry. I have a 59 x 60 or 61 Carl Strong
 

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Don't forget to add in the additional reach from the stem to the hoods!!! Before you get carried away with the WS recommendation, post how tall you are, your cycling inseam, and your shirt sleeve length. If you have a bike, post its geometry, including saddle height, seattube angle, stem length and what you don't like about it right now. Wait a while and this guy named C-40 will post a response. Listen to it.
 

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don't believe it..

IMO, most of the fit calculators are pretty worthless. None have any clue where the saddle will be positioned and thus the calculated reach may be way off. Body dimensions are difficult to take accurately, that's whay getting on a fit bike or any trainer-mounted bike of approximately the correct size is a far better way to determine frame size and reach. As someone else commented, post some accurate dimesnsions and maybe we can help.

If you've never owned a road bike, it's probably worth your money to pay for a professional fitting. No two fitters will agree completely, but it's bound to be better than relying on an online calculator. Check out the site below for some of the basics of fitting. One of the most common mistakes is failing to apply saddle-like crotch pressure when measuring inseam. A 2cm error in inseam would throw a fit calculator way off.

www.coloradocyclist.com/bikefit
 

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Resident Curmudgeon
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DeRosas and Mondonico's both have long top tubes. I'm built about the same as you & ride a 60 cm DeRosa, with a 140mm stem. Nice and roomy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the ideas & more info

My measurements are correct as far as I can tell. I followed the directions and had my wife measure. 34 is my "cycling" inseam. I've been riding for 4 years now on a 57cm Litespeed Arenberg. (it has something around 58cm c-c top tube, and right now a 110mm stem) I don't think I've ever felt completely comfortable on it, and I get some lower back pain on rides over 20 miles. My thinking is that it might be because I'm too bunched up. I'm 72.5 inches tall, my shirt sleeves are 37. Here's what went into the wrench science calculator fwiw.
72.5,60,34,31,19.5,8,205,9.5 (all inches)
But, it seems I should visit my lbs to get fitted instead. I'd rather get the frame right this time rather than guessing by what feels ok at the moment.
BTW, the wrench science seat height came back right where mine is set at. 76cm.
Mike
 

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100% torqued
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Wrench science always spits out this kind of fit. It is not wrong in total reach usually just on how to get there. Buy the next size up on frame and get the stem to complete the fit. WS likes big saddle to bar drops.
 

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Let's do a little comparision. You are 1" taller than I am, with a 1" longer cycling inseam, and 1" longer sleave length. For me a 57cm toptube bike with a 110 stem is a good starting point (assuming a 73degree seattube). At 1" taller with a little more reach, I would expect to see you on a 58-59cm toptube length frame tops.

Since you have a current ride, you have a far better opportunity to figure out what fits well than any fit kit or machine. You can change you current setup easily and figure out what actually works for you on rides. Lower back pain!!! My first thought is core strength and your saddle-bar drop is to much. How much drop do you have from the saddle to the bars.

If you want to see how a bigger bike will feel, get a 130mm stem and ride it for a couple of weeks. Play with your bar height, but only change one thing at a time. Also, any change is going to feel weird and wrong at first, so ride a few times with a new setup. If you find you love the 130mm stem, either keep it and stick with your current ride, or use the setup to translate your sizing to a new ride (i.e. 59cm toptube 120 stem).
 

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toss yourself on a 59 C Lemond

with standard geometry and a 120 stem. That is a 59 TT with a 120, see how that feels.
 

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cdmc said:
Since you have a current ride, you have a far better opportunity to figure out what fits well than any fit kit or machine. You can change you current setup easily and figure out what actually works for you on rides.
I agree. Try your current ride with a 12 or 13 cm stem. Keep the stem height the same at first.
Other suggestions:
Post a pic from the side of you riding your current bike.

When on the hoods, can you see the front hub? Is it obstructed by the handlebar, or is it in front of the bar? This is just a starting point, but it can help us.
 

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case for a sloping top tube

Larger frame to get appropriate top tube length, with a sloping design (doesn't have to be a true compact design) to get the standover you need.
 

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I disagree with trying your current bike with a longer stem. All that will do is move you more forward on the bike, placing more weight on your hands. You'll have more reach, but it won't be comfy. A bike with a longer top tube will move you back from the headtube. The effect is you'll be able to get power to the pedals in a more efficient, comfortable manner. It makes a world of difference. My commuter has a relatively short/normal? length top tube. I moved the seat back as far as I could, & put a 140 stem on it. I'm not quite so bunched up, but there's a lot of weight on my hands & arms. When I get on my DeRosa, the difference in position is actually shocking, it's so much more comfy & efficient.
 
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