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Sort or serious conversation:

In an online society, I am partially lost to what is the actual etiquette for blocking people and getting blocked. It goes the full spectrum of contacts, people i have had limited conversation with to people that i have had great in-depth history with. In this modern society where you can break a relationship with just a single mouse click, whether its justified or not.

What is the proper etiquette when approaching online contacts in terms of befriending, unfriending, out right blocking to reporting as spam?
 

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If I ever reach a point where I feel like I have to think about all of that stuff when on the internet, I'll probably just stop being on the internet.
 

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If somebody annoys you, block them. If you annoy somebody enough, they block you. If some strange account shows up with the purpose of selling something, that's spam.

Befriend those with whom you have things in common, and who are also within riding distance if you so wish, and don't take it personally if people don't accept a friend request......I guess, since I'm not on FB.
 

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I'm not sure how to block someone on the Internet, but I can set a good pick on a basketball court. In real life, my wife says I get kind of a glazed look in my eye, stop looking at a person, and tend to show a general disinterest when I don't want to interact with someone. I guess I need an emoji that conveys all that.
 

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Make America grope again
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I think it varies a lot for different platforms and purposes. Are you using a platform to keep in touch with family and friends? Or is social media part of your work networking, or business marketing? Do you have a big divide between your work life and your personal life?

I use my fb mostly for personal contacts. So my 'friends' really are friends - not just any random person that I talked to once. I don't use it to promote a business, or anything. I blocked two friends of mine who went through a nasty divorce and tried to drag it into social media / make friends pick sides. I picked neither, thank you. I don't think that there was much of an etiquette issue - when people go nuclear with a divorce, they are going to loose friends in real life and online.

I have used the 'hide posts from this person, but keep as friend' feature on a few of my friends who seem to spend all day posting jokes and memes (where do they find the time?) People don't seem to notice that you have 'hidden' them.

If you are using social media for business, there are some good articles out there. Stuff like 'how to network on linked in' or 'how to use twitter to market your business.' With that kind of stuff, people have much wider networks. But you do want to block anyone who is just going to spam your contacts, or mine your contacts to solicit them.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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True.

However, (smart) phones have raised narcissism and a person's overinflated self worth to unprecedented levels as a conduit to social media.
I don't know if it caused it...it just provided a safety valve for something-that-is-already-there to let out that want-to-imagine-everything-they-do-as-having-significance or as cool to someone somewhere. People wanting to gab on-and-on about unimportant things no one around them cares about existed a long time before social media.

In the English language-speaking culture manners/etiquette have been disappearing for a long while. Most other, at least European, languages I know of have "you" (informal usage, for someone you really "know") and "thou" (AKA "you" formal for use in polite circumstances or with someone you don't know)...Formal niceties have been disappearing from society for a long while.
 

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Seat's not level
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I don't know if it caused it...it just provided a safety valve for something-that-is-already-there to let out that want-to-imagine-everything-they-do-as-having-significance or as cool to someone somewhere. People wanting to gab on-and-on about unimportant things no one around them cares about existed a long time before social media.

In the English language-speaking culture manners/etiquette have been disappearing for a long while. Most other, at least European, languages I know of have "you" (informal usage, for someone you really "know") and "thou" (AKA "you" formal for use in polite circumstances or with someone you don't know)...Formal niceties have been disappearing from society for a long while.
Actually the Boom box allowed individuals to take over public spaces with their choice of interaction with no regard to others.

The Sony Walkman allowed them to tune out the world around them.

The cell phone now allows both.
 

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